News

Jul
10
2019
July 8, 2019
Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, according to a study by Matthew Andersson, assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Research published in the Journal of Aging and Health showed that work disruptions range from mild, such as adjusting work hours, to severe. Severe disruptions include moving from full- to part-time jobs, taking a leave of absence or even early retirement.
Jul
8
2019
July 8, 2019
Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, according to a new Baylor study in the Journal of Aging and Health. The study, led by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, included 642 workers at a public university who were unpaid caregivers for seniors – typically parents, spouses or friends. HealthDay is a leading syndicated provider of health-related news and research.
Jul
3
2019
July 1, 2019
This article on how scientists are making robots appear more relatable cites a study conducted by Baylor University sociologist Paul McClure that found that a growing number of people were “technophobic,” meaning they have a fear of losing their jobs to automation.
Jul
1
2019
July 1, 2019
This article, aimed at those who work as caregivers in long-term care communities, cites a recent Baylor study about challenges facing people with elder caregiving responsibilities outsideof work. “Given that recruiting and retaining workers are two of the biggest challenges facing senior living operators, it’s worth listening to what these researchers have to say,” the article notes. The study, led by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, found that workers with unmet needs related to their caregiving more frequently needed to adjust work hours, move from a full-time to a part-time position or take a leave of absence or even early retirement compared. Some of those needs could be met by workplace programs, flexibility and communication.
Jul
1
2019
July 1, 2019
This article on how scientists are making robots appear more relatable cites a study conducted by Baylor University sociologist Paul McClure that found that a growing number of people were “technophobic,” meaning they have a fear of losing their jobs to automation.
Jun
27
2019
June 25, 2019
People who care for elderly relatives outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for their help — experience considerable disruption of workplace routines, and many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel they should use it, according to a study led by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. About one in four employed U.S. adults provides informal care for a family member older than 65. The article was published in the Journal of Aging and Health.
Jun
26
2019
June 25, 2019
People who care for elderly relatives outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for their help — experience considerable disruption of workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel they should use it, according to a study led by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. About one in four employed U.S. adults provides informal care for a family member older than 65. The article was published in the Journal of Aging and Health. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media and Public Relations, pitched this research story nationally.)
Jun
26
2019
June 25, 2019
This article cites a 2016 paper in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, in which Jeremy E. Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, found that people who stop attending church after high school are most likely to return as married parents, childless couples or single parents. However, young adults get married later in life, which partly accounts for the delay in coming back to church.
Jun
26
2019
June 25, 2019
People who care for elderly relatives outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for their help — experience considerable disruption of workplace routines, and many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel they should use it, according to a study led by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. About one in four employed U.S. adults provides informal care for a family member older than 65. The article was published in the Journal of Aging and Health.
Jun
25
2019
June 25, 2019
People who care for their parents outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for their help — experience considerable disruption of their workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel able to use it, even if it is available, according to a Baylor University researcher. “A big and overwhelming consequence of America’s aging population is that so-called sandwiched caregivers, typically middle-aged, are caring for ailing parents while trying to work full-time and raise their own children,” said Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor University’s College of Arts & Sciences.
Jun
25
2019
WACO, Texas (June 25, 2019) — People who care for their parents outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for that help — experience considerable disruption of their workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel able to use it, even if available, according to a Baylor University researcher.
Jun
25
2019
WACO, Texas (June 25, 2019) — People who care for their parents outside of their full-time jobs — and are unpaid for that help — experience considerable disruption of their workplace routines. Many are not getting employer support because it is not offered or because they do not feel able to use it, even if available, according to a Baylor University researcher.
Jun
5
2019
June 4, 2019
This column about revitalizing and strengthening rural communities and the importance of public-private efforts to do so cites studies by Baylor sociology professors Charles M. Tolbert, Ph.D., and F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D. They have found that, "a thriving small business sector leads to stronger communities with higher levels of income, less income inequality, less poverty, better public health, lower crime and less out-migration of residents to other areas."
May
28
2019
May 24, 2019
Americans who believe that faithful believers in God receive financial rewards are less likely to have started their own business, according to new research that examined the impact of the prosperity gospel. The study appears in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Researchers included lead author Kevin D. Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences; Mitchell J. Neubert, Ph.D., professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business; and Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology.
May
24
2019
May 23, 2019
Belief in the “Prosperity Gospel” — that God financially blesses faithful followers — does not turn individuals into successful entrepreneurs. But prosperity beliefs can fuel values linked to entrepreneurial thinking, such as power and achievement, according to a national Baylor University published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Researchers included lead author Kevin D. Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences; Mitchell J. Neubert, Ph.D., professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business; and Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology.
May
22
2019
WACO, Texas (May 22, 2019) — Belief in the “Prosperity Gospel” — that God financially blesses faithful followers — does not turn individuals into successful entrepreneurs. But prosperity beliefs can fuel values linked to entrepreneurial thinking, such as power and achievement, according to a Baylor University study.
May
22
2019
WACO, Texas (May 22, 2019) — Belief in the “Prosperity Gospel” — that God financially blesses faithful followers — does not turn individuals into successful entrepreneurs. But prosperity beliefs can fuel values linked to entrepreneurial thinking, such as power and achievement, according to a Baylor University study.
May
10
2019
May 10, 2019
AUDIO: On the latest episode of Baylor Connections, host Derek Smith interviews Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, about his religion research that has shaped national understanding on topics like religious affiliation, diversity, church attendance, the impact of religion on other aspects of social life and more. Dr. Dougherty examines the rise of multiracial churches and dives deep into the trends, highlights and meaning behind the numbers of diversity in congregational life. Baylor Connections is a weekly radio program/podcast that introduces the people behind Baylor’s teaching, research and distinct role in higher education.
Feb
26
2019
Feb. 23, 2019
(Third news item) A new Baylor study has found that while women are more likely than men to take the Bible literally, that is because literalism is tied more to a person’s attachment to God, and women generally are socialized differently. “People who take the Bible literally tend to perceive of God more as a person who can be interacted with,” said Blake Kent, Ph.D., a former Baylor sociologist. The study, published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, was conducted by Kent and Christopher Pieper, Ph.D., senior lecturer of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.
Feb
22
2019
Feb. 21, 2019
Women are more likely than men to believe the Bible is literally true, but a Baylor University study finds this may have more to do with how people relate to God than it does gender. Both men and women who report high levels of closeness to God take the Bible more literally – and this confidence grows stronger as they seek intimacy with God through prayer and Bible study. The research, published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, was conducted by Christopher Pieper, Ph.D., senior lecturer of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and former Baylor sociologist Blake Victor Kent, Ph.D., now a research fellow at Harvard Medical School.
Feb
20
2019
Feb. 20, 2019
Women are more likely than men to believe the Bible is literally true, but a Baylor University study finds this may have more to do with how people relate to God than it does gender. Both men and women who report high levels of closeness to God take the Bible more literally – and this confidence grows stronger as they seek intimacy with God through prayer and Bible study. The research, published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, was done by Christopher Pieper, Ph.D., senior lecturer of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and former Baylor sociologist Blake Victor Kent, Ph.D., now a research fellow at Harvard Medical School.
Feb
18
2019
WACO, Texas (Feb. 18, 2019) — Women are more likely than men to believe the Bible is literally true, but a recent Baylor University study finds this may have more to do with how people relate to God than it does gender. Both men and women who report high levels of closeness to God take the Bible more literally – and this confidence grows stronger as they seek closeness to God through prayer and Bible study.
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