News

Nov
20
2020
A Baylor doctoral candidate in sociology has been selected to receive grant money through an annual national program that supports research into real-world problems facing entrepreneurs and their communities.
Aug
17
2020
WACO, Texas (Aug. 17, 2020) – People who experience threats to their existence — which these days may well be economic and political instability — are more likely to experience miracles, according to a Baylor University study.
Jul
22
2020
Kevin Dougherty and Jesse DeDeyne documented how students used their cellphones during a sociology class last fall (spoiler: texting friends and checking Snapchat) and discuss how they'll change their teaching in response.
Mar
11
2020
From sailors to motorcycle gangs, tattoos have long been a hallmark of rebellion, and a subtle indicator of someone outside the mainstream. But that stigma has eroded significantly in recent years, and today, it's hardly surprising to see a tattoo on almost anyone. That's what led Baylor sociology professor Kevin Dougherty to consider what tattoos...
Mar
4
2020
March 3, 2020
VIDEO: This story features the recent research by Baylor sociologist Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., on the increasing trend of faith-centered tattoos.
Feb
27
2020
Feb. 27, 2020
Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology, co-authored this op-ed with Catherine Harnois, Ph.D., of Wake Forest University about their research that looks at how conditions in the workplace can contribute to health inequities and gender discrimination.
Feb
25
2020
Feb. 24, 2020
With more than a quarter of U.S. adults now having tattoos — and nearly half of millennials sporting them — only a handful of studies have focused on religious tattoos. But a new study by researchers at Baylor and Texas Tech analyzes faith-centered tattoos, finding that they tend to be self-oriented.
Feb
24
2020
Feb. 21, 2020
Parents are often disappointed when a teen or adult child acquires a tattoo. But a newly published study led by Baylor University scholar Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., suggests Mom and Dad may want to go easy when the images are religious in nature.
Feb
19
2020
Feb. 18, 2020
AUDIO: Baylor sociology professor Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., is interviewed by Texas Standard host David Brown about new research from Baylor and Texas Tech that studied religious tattoos and found a major shift in how the faithful feel about marking their body. (Terry Goodrich with Media & Public Relations helped arrange this interview on Baylor research.)
Feb
17
2020
Feb. 17, 2020
More Americans are driving farther to church, according to a new study from sociologists Kevin D. Dougherty at Baylor University and Mark T. Mulder at Calvin University.
Jan
6
2020
Dec. 22, 2019
This article about the growing religion trend of geography no longer being the arbiter of church membership cites recent Baylor sociology research that found that the percentage of Americans driving between 16 and 30 miles to church jumped from 24% in 2001 to 32% in 2017. The group driving more than 30 miles rose from 4 to 9% — or nearly 1 in 10 churchgoers.
Jan
3
2020
Jan
2
2020
Dec. 23, 2019
Neither “worshiping local” nor commuting to church make Christians better neighbors. Instead, it’s the frequency of attendance that brings out those neighborly attitudes and behaviors, according to a new study led by Baylor sociologist Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D.
Dec
6
2019
Dec. 3, 2019
A new study led by Baylor sociology professor Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., shows that frequent worship service attendance — whether “worshipping local” or traveling farther — is associated with higher commitment to the neighborhood where the congregant lives.
Dec
5
2019
Dec. 4, 2019
Baylor sociology professor Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., led a new study that shows that frequent worship service attendance — whether “worshipping local” or traveling farther — is associated with higher commitment to the neighborhood where the congregant lives.
Dec
4
2019
Dec. 3, 2019
Baylor sociology professor Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., led a new study that shows that frequent worship service attendance — whether “worshipping local” or traveling farther — is associated with higher commitment to the neighborhood where the congregant lives.
Nov
13
2019
Nov. 11, 2019
This article about how Internet usage could be a reason why there are more churchless Americans cites a 2018 Baylor sociology study, which found that increases in Internet use correlate with a loss of religious affiliation.
Oct
23
2019
Oct. 23, 2019
This article about the growth of multicultural churches quotes Baylor sociologist Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., who has published several studies on multi-ethnic churches.
Oct
21
2019
Oct. 18, 2019
Sociology professor Paul Froese, Ph.D., director of the Baylor Religion Surveys, is quoted in this article about a recent Pew Research Center survey that asked Americans multiple-choice questions about their knowledge of religion. (Terry Goodrich with Baylor Media & Public Relations arranged this faculty expert interview.)
Oct
15
2019
It’s been nearly 15 years since the first Baylor Religion Survey was released in 2005. In the years since, the survey has gained recognition as one of the nation’s most influential and comprehensive indicators of the ways Americans live out their faith. Covering topics like secularism, megachurches, politics, nationalism, attitudes towards prayer, and individual conceptions …
Oct
2
2019
Sept. 27, 2019
George Yancey, Ph.D., professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and with the Institute for Studies of Religion’s Program on Christianity and Community Studies, facilitated a conversation about religious discrimination within higher education as part of a seminar hosted by the St. Olaf College Institute for Freedom and Community.
Sep
18
2019
Sept. 17, 2019
This article mentions a 2019 Baylor sociology study that found that women are more likely than men to believe the Bible is literally true, but that may have more to do with how people relate to God than it does gender.
Aug
9
2019
Aug. 7, 2019
This story cites research by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, about the challenges of the growing number of informal (unpaid) caregivers who care for an elderly family member, often in addition to their regular jobs. Many of those informal caregivers experience significant work disruptions — such as needing to move from full-time to part-time status or take a leave of absence to give care. They often don’t receive support from their employers, either because it is not offered or because they are hesitant to use it.
Aug
9
2019
Aug. 7, 2019
This story cites research by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, about the challenges of the growing number of informal (unpaid) caregivers who care for an elderly family member, often in addition to their regular jobs. Many of those informal caregivers experience significant work disruptions — such as needing to move from full-time to part-time status or take a leave of absence to give care. They often don’t receive support from their employers, either because it is not offered or because they are hesitant to use it.
Jul
10
2019
July 8, 2019
Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, according to a study by Matthew Andersson, assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Research published in the Journal of Aging and Health showed that work disruptions range from mild, such as adjusting work hours, to severe. Severe disruptions include moving from full- to part-time jobs, taking a leave of absence or even early retirement.
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