Baylor Lariat: White males are more emotionally connected to guns, Baylor study shows
[12/7/2017]
Nov. 30, 2017
Paul Froese, Ph.D., and F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D., professors of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, conducted a nationally representative survey that found white male gun owners who have struggled economically are most likely to be emotionally connected to their guns. The Baylor study also found that religious, white male gun owners are less likely to find power in their guns and that religious affiliations do not correlate with gun attitudes.
(FULL STORY)

Fort Worth Star-Telegram: Poor, white men more likely to ‘cling’ to guns, study finds
[11/30/2017]
Nov. 29, 2017
This story centers on new research by F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D., and Paul Froese, Ph.D., professors of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The professors found that white, male gun owners who have lost, or fear losing, their economic footing tend to feel morally and emotionally attached to their guns. “Gun control for these owners has come to represent an attack on their masculinity, independence and moral identity,” Froese is quoted in the story. “The gun becomes their central, sacred object.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Media Communications, pitched this story nationally.)
(FULL STORY)

Austin American-Statesman: Baylor study probes ‘moral, emotional’ attachment to guns in white men
[11/30/2017]
Nov. 29, 2017
A new Baylor University study found that economic anxiety can be linked to white male gun owners feeling “morally and emotionally attached to their guns.” Researchers F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D., and Paul Froese, Ph.D., professors of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, found that “white men in economic distress find comfort in guns as a means to reestablish a sense of individual power and moral certitude.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Media Communications, pitched this story nationally.)
(FULL STORY)

Houston Chronicle: White men who fear poverty are more attached to their guns, Baylor study finds
[11/29/2017]
Nov. 27, 2017
White males with economic anxiety tend to feel more “morally and emotionally attached” to their guns than other demographics, according to a study by Carson Mencken, Ph.D., and Paul Froese, Ph.D., professors of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. They also found that the same group tends to view violence against the government as sometimes justifiable. Also, white male gun owners see the ability to protect their property, families and communities is restorative,” Mencken said. The research was published in the journal Social Problems. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Newsweek: White male gun owners fearful about finances find stricter gun laws are attacks on their masculinity, study says
[11/28/2017]
Nov. 27, 2017
For white male gun owners going through financial difficulties, passionate views about their firearms derive from a sense of "empowerment,” and they may see stricter gun laws as an attack on their masculinity, independence and moral identity, according to research by Baylor sociology professors Carson Mencken, Ph.D., and Paul Froese, Ph.D. The study was published in Social Problems and was based on an analysis of data from the fourth wave of the Baylor Religion Survey. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)


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