Medical Xpress: Oversimplifying beliefs about causes of mental illness may hinder social acceptance
[1/17/2018]
Jan. 9, 2018
Belief that mental illness is biological has increased among both health experts and the public in recent years. But campaigns to treat it as a disease and increase social acceptance may be lacking because other factors, such as bad character and upbringing, still are viewed as playing a role, a Baylor University study has found. Quoted is research lead author Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology.
(FULL STORY)

PsychCentral.com: Stigma of Mental Illness Linked to Mix of Beliefs About Causes
[1/16/2018]
Jan. 15, 2018
A new study finds that campaigns to treat mental illness as a disease and increase social acceptance may be lacking because people also tend to believe that other factors such as bad character may play a role, muddying the picture. Quoted is research lead author Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology.
(FULL STORY)

PsyPost: Increases in internet use linked to a loss of religious affiliation, study finds
[1/16/2018]
Jan. 12, 2018
People who surf the Internet more often are more likely to be religiously unaffiliated, according to new research published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. “One of my main findings in this study is that increases in Internet use correlate with a loss of religious affiliation, and I also discovered that individuals who spend lots of time online are less likely to be religious exclusivists, or in other words they’re less likely to think there’s only one correct religion out there,” aid Baylor sociologist and study author Paul K. McClure. “I argue that Internet use encourages a certain ‘tinkering’ posture which makes individuals feel that they’re no longer beholden to institutions or religious dogma.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and is pitching this study to national media.)
(FULL STORY)

Bustle: Mental Health Stigma Doesn’t Change Even If People Are Informed about Cause of Illness, According to New Study
[1/12/2018]
Jan. 10, 2018
Essay about a Baylor study on mental illness and stigma published in the journal Society and Mental Health. A data analysis from a survey of more than 1,100 individuals showed that even when people acknowledged biological and genetic causes of mental illness, they didn't rule out things like bad character or upbringing as contributors. Simply believing that mental illness is a medical condition is not enough to get rid of the stigma. Quoted is lead author Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., lead author and assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and is pitching these findings to national media.)
(FULL STORY)


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