Baylor University
Department of Biology
College of Arts and Sciences

Baylor > Biology > Faculty Directory > Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor

Faculty - Mark Taylor

Associate Professor of Biology

A.229 Baylor Sciences Building
(254) 710-2123
Mark_Taylor@baylor.edu

Associate Professor of Biology

Education--
A.S. Kilgore College
BS, Stephen F. Austin State University
MS, Stephen F. Austin State University
Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Major area of research--Aquatic Ecology, Innovative Teaching Techniques for Biology

Courses currently teaching--
Human Anatomy & Physiology
Modern Concepts in Bioscience (1305 & 1306)

Biography

Having had exposure to a variety of institutions of higher learning, I can truthfully say that Baylor University is a unique and remarkable place to learn. While Baylor professors strive to excel in teaching and academic research, they also allow ample time to meet with students outside of class. This is somewhat unique in a university setting, but it demonstrates that Baylor professors truly have the students success and well-being as a major priority. While most students visiting my office have questions about course material, others simply stop by to talk.

I teach undergraduate courses in human anatomy & physiology (A&P) and introductory biology. The A&P courses are designed primarily for students who wish to enter an allied health field such as nursing, nutrition science, or physical and occupational therapy. Over the years, I have had the privilege of seeing many exceptional students in the classroom, and I consider it an honor to play at least a small role in helping them reach their career goals. My greatest satisfaction is seeing the "light come on" in the eyes of students when they suddenly understand a difficult concept. When that happens, I consider the day at work to be a success.

My academic and research interests range from aquatic ecology research (the study of interactions among different species in freshwater environments) to developing and patenting education games that teach biological concepts. My teaching goal is to not only help students see the relevance of the course to their future career, but also to learn how to think about biological concepts. I strive to teach in a way that never loses sight of the "big picture." After all, if all a person sees only the bark on the trees, how can they appreciate the beauty of the forest.


Department of Biology