Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


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Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

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Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splash Students choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

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HealthDay: No Kidding: Childless Couples Happier
[6/29/2016]
June 28, 2016
Parents in the United States generally are not as happy as those without children, with the major reason being the relative lack of workplace "packages'' of policies such as paid sick time, paid vacation, flexible work hours and paid maternal or parental leave, said co-researcher Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The U.S. also has the largest "happiness gap" among parents compared to nonparents in 22 industrialized countries, according to the study, to be published in a forthcoming issue of the American Journal of Sociology. HealthDay is featured on more than 5,000 websites, among them CBS News, MSN Health Living, U.S. News & World Report and WebMD. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Huffington Post: Why Parents In The U.S. Have The Biggest ‘Happiness Gap’
[6/28/2016]
June 27, 2016
A new study by researchers from Baylor and two other universities finds that U.S. parents are not generally as happy as the country’s non-parents, with the major factor being the relative lack of social policies supporting mothers and fathers. Those include paid leave, paid vacation, flexibility in work schedules and childcare assistance. In the study of 22 industrialized countries, the United States had the largest “happiness gap” between parents and non-parents. The study will be published in the American Journal of Sociology in September. Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was one of three researchers. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Yahoo! News: Parents in US not as happy as those without kids
[6/27/2016]
June 27, 2016
The United States has the largest “happiness gap” among parents compared to nonparents in 22 industrialized countries, according to a report co-authored by a Baylor researcher. The U.S. falls “strikingly behind,” with parents less happy than non-parents because of a relative lack of workplace “packages’’ such as paid sick time, paid vacation, flexible work hours and paid parental leave, said Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Oklahoman (Oklahoma City): American parents have biggest happiness gap of 22 countries, but employers could change that
[6/24/2016]
June 23, 2016
American parents are less happy than their childless counterparts. And the parenthood "happiness gap" is greater in the United States than in 21 other countries studied, according to a briefing paper prepared for the Council on Contemporary Families. Researchers wrote they were astonished to discover "the negative effects of parenthood on happiness were entirely explained by the presence or absence of social policies allowing parents to better combine paid work with family obligations." One of the researchers is Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

United States Parents Not as Happy as Those without Children, Baylor University Researcher Says
[6/23/2016]

(FULL STORY)

United States Parents Not as Happy as Those without Children, Baylor University Researcher Says
[6/22/2016]
WACO, Texas (June 23, 2016) — Parents in the United States generally are not as happy as those who aren’t parents. Not only that, the U.S. has the largest “happiness gap” among parents compared to nonparents in 22 industrialized countries, according to a report by researchers at Baylor University, the University of Texas at Austin and Wake Forest University.
(FULL STORY)

The Boston Globe: What is making American parents so unhappy?
[6/22/2016]
June 21, 2016
Parents in a majority of 22 industrialized countries were less happy than non-parents, with the largest discrepancy being in the United States. The research, to be published in the September issue of the American Journal of Sociology, was conducted by Baylor University’s Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology, along with researchers from the University of Texas-Austin and Wake Forest University. The report found that countries with better family policy packages such as paid vacation, paid sick and paid parental leave had greater parent happiness. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology faculty and research.)
(FULL STORY)

Reno (Nevada) Gazette Journal: Faith Forum: Is it OK to pick and choose religious beliefs?
[6/21/2016]
May 27, 2016
A panel of distinguished religious leaders from Nevada react to the findings of a recent Baylor study that found that young people who use social media are more likely to develop a “pick-and-choose” approach to their faith — regardless of what their religious tradition teaches — than those who do not use social media. The research was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives by Paul McClure, a doctoral candidate in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Baptist Standard: Young social media users less committed to single religion, research shows
[6/15/2016]
May 31, 2016
Young people who use social media are more likely to develop a “pick-and-choose” approach to customize their faith—regardless what their religious tradition teaches—than those who do not use social media, a Baylor study revealed. “On Facebook, there is no expectation that one’s ‘likes’ be logically consistent and hidebound by tradition,” said sociology researcher Paul K. McClure. “Religion, as a result, does not consist of timeless truths. ... Instead, the Facebook effect is that all spiritual options become commodities and resources that individuals can tailor to meet their needs.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Urban Christian News: Study: Young Social Media Users More Likely to Customize Faith Regardless of Religious Tradition
[6/14/2016]
June 1, 2016
Young people who use social media are more likely to develop a “pick-and-choose” approach to customize their faith—regardless what their religious tradition teaches—than those who do not use social media, a Baylor study revealed. “On Facebook, there is no expectation that one’s ‘likes’ be logically consistent and hidebound by tradition,” said sociology researcher Paul K. McClure. “Religion, as a result, does not consist of timeless truths. ... Instead, the Facebook effect is that all spiritual options become commodities and resources that individuals can tailor to meet their needs.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Young Social Media Users May Hold Untraditional Faith Beliefs
[5/18/2016]
Youths who use social media are more likely to develop a “pick-and-choose” approach to customize their faith — regardless of what their religious tradition teaches — than those who do not use social media, according to a study by Paul McClure, doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.
(FULL STORY)

Why do we pick-and-choose our religious beliefs? Blame social media
[5/16/2016]
Young social media users are more likely to “pick and choose” their religious beliefs — regardless of what their faith tradition teaches — than those who do not use social media, according to a study by Paul McClure, a doctoral candidate in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The study, published in the journal Sociological Perspectives, was based on an analysis of national data gathered from 3,290 youths from 2002 to 2013, following them from when they were between the ages of 13 and 17 until they were ages 22 to 29.
(FULL STORY)

Congregations Striving for Racial and Ethnic Diversity May Shrink, Baylor Study Finds
[5/9/2016]
Congregations trying to boost their racial and ethnic diversity may end up with fewer people in the seats, according to a Baylor study published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Researchers analyzed data from more than 11,000 congregations in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ECLA) for a 19-year period. "Racial diversity itself is not a detriment to growth," said lead author Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences. "It is the process of changing the racial composition of a congregation that causes difficulties."
(FULL STORY)


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