Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.
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Insurance Journal: Employee Loyalty Highest at Small, Local Businesses
[11/25/2014]
Nov. 24, 2014
This article references a recent Baylor study published in the journal “Local Economy” that found more than half of employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers. Quoted is lead author Katie Halbesleben, a doctoral student in Baylor’s department of sociology. Co-author of the study was Charles M. Tolbert, Ph.D., chair of the department of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story to national and regional media. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Big News Network: Workers of small, locally owned firms show more loyalty
[11/25/2014]
Nov. 23, 2014
New Baylor research published in the journal “Local Economy” shows that employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty towards their employers and tend to stay committed to their company even in the face of low job satisfaction. "When it comes to your job, it is usually not just one thing that affects your commitment. You may say 'I like my boss' or 'I am satisfied with what I do'," said lead author Katie Halbesleben, a doctoral student in sociology at Baylor. "Our study re-affirms that working for a small and local company is also an important factor that contributes to a worker's commitment.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story to national and regional media. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Dallas Morning News: Baylor study: Employees of small, locally owned businesses are more loyal
[11/21/2014]
Nov. 21, 2014
Employees of small, locally owned businesses are more loyal than those who work at big companies, according to a new study by Baylor University. While large firms tend to provide higher earnings and more fringe benefits, small and local businesses have many benefits to the community and to the individual, such as less income inequality, less population turnover, lower crime and more committed workers, said lead author Katie Halbesleben, a doctoral student in Baylor’s sociology department. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story to national and regional media. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Phys.org: Employees of small, locally owned businesses have more company loyalty, study finds
[11/24/2014]
Nov. 21, 2014
Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers -- and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does, according to Baylor research published in the journal “Local Economy.” "It's an interesting time because of the shift toward big business and globalization. While large firms tend to provide higher earnings and more fringe benefits, there are still practical values of small and local businesses, including benefits to the community and to the individual, such as less income inequality, less population turnover, lower crime and more committed workers," said lead author Katie Halbesleben, a doctoral student in Baylor's department of sociology. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story to national and regional media. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Daily American: 5 things to remember when you think God has abandoned you
[9/29/2014]
Sept. 25, 2014
Article about ways to keep the faith, no matter how tough things may get, cites recent research from Baylor that found that prayer can “keep you spiritual, or at the very least help you understand how you feel about your religion.” The research, published in the journal Sociology of Religion, was conducted by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who found that those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior than those who prayed but did not expect God to comfort or protect them. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and originally pitched this research nationally in August.)
(FULL STORY)

PsychCentral: New Study Examines the Effects of Prayer on Mental Health
[9/25/2014]
Sept. 19, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor study published in the journal Sociology of Religion. Those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior, said researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Spirituality and Health: Praying to a Loving God Guards Against Anxiety Disorders
[9/12/2014]
Sept. 9, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor University study published in the journal Sociology of Religion. It is perception that matters more, and those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior, said researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)


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