Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


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Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

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Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splash Students choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

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Newstalk.com (Irish Radio): Talking Books: Where can you find meaning in life?
[5/20/2016]
May 9, 2016
Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is interviewed about his latest book, “On Purpose: How We Create the Meaning of Life.” Many people view purpose as “one truth path,” he said. “One’s purpose in life is talked about something you individually find, at least in the modern world,” he said. “But one of the things that I think is constant through time is the fact that you can’t think about yourself without thinking about the community.”
(FULL STORY)

New Boston Post: Study: Congregational diversity leads to church attendance decline
[5/20/2016]
May 17, 2016
Congregations attempting to boost their racial and ethnic diversity may end up with fewer people in the seats, according to a Baylor study published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Those that are "planted" as diverse have the greatest potential to sustain that diversity, said lead author Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched the research nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Waco Tribune-Herald: Social media affects religious commitments of young people, according to Baylor study
[5/20/2016]
May 19, 2016
Young people who frequently use social media are more likely to have a pick-and-choose approach to religion to suit their needs, regardless of their faith tradition, according to a study by Paul McClure, doctoral candidate in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. “I think technology tends to give individuals so much control over their life’s circumstances and presents so many options before them that people feel empowered to approach religion with a cafeteria-style mentality,” McClure said. The study was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story and arranged the interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Live Mint: Use of social media can make you more tolerant
[5/19/2016]
May 17, 2016
Youths who use social media are more likely to express tolerance towards other religious beliefs, according to a study by Baylor University. The study, published in the journal Sociological Perspectives, was based on an analysis of three surveys of youths between 13 and 29 from 2002 to 2013. It revealed that youths involved on social networks were more likely to show religious tolerance. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

KWKT-TV (Waco/FOX): Baylor study: there is correlation between FB and faith
[5/19/2016]
May 18, 2016
Young people who frequently use social media are more likely to have a “buffet-style” faith, picking and choosing elements of religion to suit their needs, according to a study by Paul McClure, doctoral candidate in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. “It could be ironic that the very technology which religious professionals use to share or promote their message could at the same time undermine their institutional authority,” McClure said in the interview. The study was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story and arranged the interview. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Business Standard: Young FB users more open to different religious beliefs
[5/18/2016]
May 17, 2016
Youths who use social media are more likely to develop a “pick-and-choose” approach to customize their faith — regardless of what their religious tradition teaches — than those who do not use social media, according to a study by Paul McClure, doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The study was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives. “On Facebook, there is no expectation that one’s ‘likes’ be logically consistent and hidebound by tradition,” he said. “Instead, the Facebook effect is that all spiritual options become commodities and resources that individuals can tailor to meet their needs.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)


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