Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


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Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

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Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

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Waco Tribune-Herald: Evangelical support for Trump strains relationships among believers
[11/21/2016]
Nov. 20, 2016
Thomas S. Kidd, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of History and associate director of Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion, and Matt Henderson, M.A. ’14, a sociology doctoral candidate at Baylor, are quoted in this article about how many evangelicals, following the presidential election, are struggling to heal wounds within their own congregations, while pondering their place in the greater culture.
(FULL STORY)

USA TODAY: Preaching to Facebook faithful: Vatican looks past the pulpit to social media
[11/7/2016]
Nov. 7, 2016
VIDEO: A Baylor sociologist’s research is cited in this article about how the Vatican has expanded its communication venues to include social media. Quoted is Paul McClure, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, whose study “Faith and Facebook in a Pluralistic Age” was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives. “The ‘Facebook effect’ is that all spiritual options become commodities and resources that individuals can tailor to meet their needs,” McClure said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched McClure’s research in May to national media. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Health and Fitness: Money Can’t Buy Child Health without Parent Affection
[10/20/2016]
Oct. 18, 2016
Growing up in a well-off home can benefit a child’s physical health even decades later, but a lack of parent-child warmth, or the presence of abuse, may eliminate the health advantage of a privileged background, according to a Baylor study by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers psychology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)


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