Coat of Arms

The HRC coat of arms follows traditional heraldric principles and makes use of traditional heraldric colors. As a whole, the shield represents Faith, and the individual symbols, functioning together, invoke John 14:6: "Jesus told his disciples, 'I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.'" Our motto, Fides quaerens intellectum ('Faith seeking understanding'), was one of the favorite sayings of St. Anselm of Canterbury, and reminds us that all quest for the truth is predicated on Faith.

The radiant sun in the upper section represents the light, shining down upon the open book, which signifies the Honors College student's quest for truth ("veritas") through learning. The colors of the book--red and white--point to the Theological Virtue of caritas, or "Charity," which HRC members seek to exemplify at Baylor and within the community at large. The upturned chevron reminds us, ultimately, that all learning must be directed toward the Good, and that, as human beings, our ultimate end is, as Thomas Aquinas puts it, "the vision of God in His Essence."

Colors in the shield bear important messages, also. In keeping with traditional heraldric code, silver (Argent) signifies the peace and sincerity to which our community aspires. Gold (Or) is the color of generosity and elevation of the mind, to which all Honors College students aspire. And, the blue (Azure) signifies the ideals of truth and loyalty, upon which the meaningful and life-long friendships formed in the HRC are founded.



History of the HRC Coat of Arms

In September 2006, a student committee, including residents from each of the four Honors College programs, began outlining a philosophy for the HRC coat of arms.

The members of the design committee, now Baylor alumni, were: Bobby Basaldu, Will Brian, Sarah Gillespie, Julie Hamilton, Amy Issa, Gideon Jeffrey, Grace McCullough ('07), Joy McCullough ('07), Brock Scheller, and Taylor Tomasini.

An initial sketch of the design concept was created with input from the committee by Brock Scheller, and the final artistic rendering was painted by Gideon Jeffrey.