Dr. Caleb D. Martin

Assistant Professor

Education

Ph.D
The University of Western Ontario, Canada - 2011

B.S.
Mount Allison University, Canada - 2007

Postdoctoral Fellow
University of California, Riverside 2011-2012 University of California, San Diego 2012-2013

Experience

Assistant Professor
Baylor University - 2013-present

Research

We are a synthetic research group at Baylor University. Located in Waco, Texas we are focused on exploring the synthesis and properties of organoboron compounds. We will utilize these unusual species in new chemical transformations and optoelectronics.

Research in the Martin group is focused on understanding new avenues in organoboron chemistry. Our research is focused on developing new bonding arrangements around the boron centre and subsequently exploring the chemistry of these novel compounds. The desired compounds will have unusual properties and be examined for their utility in optoelectronics, Lewis acid mediated catalysis and small molecule activation reactions. Our research interests span the fields of organic, organometallic and materials chemistry.

Organic Materials

Boron heterocycles with conjugated p systems have been determined to be great materials for electronic devices. The incorporation of tricoordinate boron gives the system unique characteristics associated with the electron deficient boron center. Despite their utility, there remain few synthetic routes to prepare boron-containing heterocycles and this has hindered the progress in this area. Our group is focused on developing novel synthetic routes to generate these species and subsequently exploring their photophysical properties.

Catalysis

The electron deficiency of associated with neutral tricoordinate boron compounds makes them very useful Lewis acids. The library of powerful Lewis acidic boranes is quite limited. We are utilizing new approaches to increase the acidity at boron to promote hydrogenation, hydrosilation and polymerization reactions. Boron-Based Organic Materials and Catalysis

Research in the Martin group is focused on understanding new avenues in organoboron chemistry. Our research is focused on developing new bonding arrangements around the boron centre and subsequently exploring the chemistry of these novel compounds. The desired compounds will have unusual properties and be examined for their utility in optoelectronics, Lewis acid mediated catalysis and small molecule activation reactions. Our research interests span organic, organometallic and materials chemistry.