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Management

Why Managers and Employees Have Wildly Different Ideas About Work-Life Balance
[2/5/2015]
Fast Company: Finding a balance between work and personal time is next to impossible, but according to Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, the responsibility of balance is left on the shoulders of the staffers. Hunter states that it is difficult to apply policies in the workplace that satisfy everyone and that Human Resources departments are underutilizing family-friendly offerings.
(FULL STORY)

Hankamer Student Awarded Prestigious Scholarship
[2/2/2015]
Senior Emily McWhirter, a human resource management major, is the recipient of a Society for Human Resource Management Foundation’s student scholarship award. SHRM confers only five undergraduate education awards each year.
(FULL STORY)

A Crucial Resume Tip for Seniors Looking for Work
[1/21/2015]
The Wall Street Journal: William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and The Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, writes that senior citizens searching for jobs should tailor their resumes for “the job opening in question.” While it is important to seem qualified for a position, a resume should not be bogged down with previous accomplishments. Instead, applicants “can remove some items and better highlight” other achievements, Reichenstein says. Dr. Reichenstein is part of “The Experts,” a group of industry, academic and cultural thinkers who weigh in on the latest debates in The Journal Report.
(FULL STORY)

Emily Hunter Interview on “Is the Customer Always Right?”
[1/17/2015]
KGO-AM “Consumer Talk”: AUDIO: Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is interviewed by San Francisco radio talk show host Michael Finney regarding her research of food service workers who retaliate after encountering disagreeable customers. Hunter describes a number of the behaviors and, knowing that there will always be such customers, she suggests employers and managers take steps – including specialized training and instituting an open-door policy – to help servers reconsider acting out.
(FULL STORY)

Service employees need to focus on customer experience
[1/15/2015]
Suncoast News: Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is featured in this story regarding her research of food service workers who retaliate after encountering disagreeable customers. Hunter provides a list of tips to help managers create a work atmosphere in which servers are less inclined to engage in counterproductive work behavior. “Providing servers with more control, flexibility and empowerment to handle customer issues can buffer buildup of stress and prevent employees from retaliating at their customers,” Hunter said.
(FULL STORY)

The Best Online Tools for Retirement Planning and Living
[1/15/2015]
The Wall Street Journal: A growing array of apps and websites makes it easier to complete many of the most basic — and most important — tasks, from saving money and creating legal documents to figuring out a second career and where to live. Quoted is William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and holder of The Pat and Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. “Our research has shown that an optimal Social Security strategy, combined with tax-efficient withdrawals, can extend the life of a portfolio by as much as 10 years or longer,” he said.
(FULL STORY)

Yes, Nasty Restaurant Customers, Servers Will Indeed Sabotage Your Food
[1/13/2015]
AdWeek: This article focuses on a study of customer-directed counterproductive work behavior co-authored by Emily Hunter, Ph.D., assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. The study of more than 400 frontline food service workers showed that the majority had participated in adverse behavior following an interaction with a disagreeable customer. Hunter, an expert on workplace deviance, is quoted in the story. "Behavior of frontline employees has a real impact on the company's bottom line," Hunter said. "Therefore, preventing counterproductive behaviors where employees yell at, ignore or degrade customers is critical."
(FULL STORY)

Financial Terms Those Nearing Retirement Often Misunderstand
[12/22/2014]
The Wall Street Journal: William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and The Pat & Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is among the Wall Street Journal’s “The Experts,” a group of retirement-planning specialists who discuss the words and phrases that they think pose the biggest problems for people nearing retirement. Dr. Reichenstein tackles the term “sustainable withdrawal rate” which tends to trip up retirees.
(FULL STORY)

New Year’s Resolutions for Soon-to-Be Retirees
[12/22/2014]
The Wall Street Journal: William Reichenstein, Ph.D., professor and The Pat & Thomas R. Powers Chair of Investment in Management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is among the Wall Street Journal’s “The Experts,” a group of retirement-planning specialists who answer the question: What’s one practical New Year’s resolution soon-to-be retirees should make? Dr. Reichenstein suggest that they should “practice retirement.”
(FULL STORY)

Why ‘Bad’ Leaders Actually Make the Best Leaders
[12/2/2014]
Healthcare Daily: An article by Gary Carini, Ph.D., professor of management and associate dean for graduate business programs at the Hankamer School of Business, about the qualities of successful leaders. “Somehow, an imperfect leader, one who is transparent about their past and current difficult experiences, can have more credibility when he or she communicates how they have learned from their very imperfection,” Carini wrote. Carini points out that the best leaders are transparent about their failures and well-practiced in their areas of expertise.
(FULL STORY)


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