Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


Welcome Message from the Chair








Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

Read More Here...

Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

Read More Here...


Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

Read More Here...




Sharon (PA) Herald: Study: Those living in scenic area less likely to go to church
[4/12/2016]
April 8, 2016
Religion News Service article about a 2015 Baylor study, published in the journal Sociology of Religion, which found that U.S. counties with nicer weather and prettier natural surroundings see lower rates of religious affiliation. Quoted is Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who conducted the research with Jeffrey A. Tamburello, also a doctoral candidate in sociology. “People continually bring up this idea of nature-based spiritual fulfillment – whether it’s people who are hiking, surfing, backpacking. We were trying to see, if this is happening at the individual level, maybe it’s actually affecting large regions like counties.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research nationally in August 2015. She covers sociology faculty and research.)
(FULL STORY)

Opposing Views: Study: Religion Improves Job Satisfaction
[3/21/2016]
March 18, 2016
New Baylor research has found that people who have a "secure attachment" to God are more likely to be satisfied with and committed to their jobs. The study by Blake Kent, doctoral candidate in sociology, and sociology professors Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., and Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., was published online in the Review of Religious Research in February. The study used data from the Baylor Religion Survey, a national survey of 860 working adults who believe in God or a higher power. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Baylor Lariat: Study relates religion to job satisfaction
[3/17/2016]
March 16, 2016
A warm, secure attachment to God correlates to higher levels of emotional attachment and work and better job satisfaction, according to a Baylor University study written by doctoral candidate in sociology Blake Kent and professors of sociology Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., and Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D. “Attachment to God, Vocational Calling and Worker Contentment” was published online in the Review of Religious Research in February. The study used data from the Baylor Religion Survey, a national survey of 860 working adults who believe in God or a higher power.
(FULL STORY)

Science Codex: Childhood poverty, parental abuse cost adults their health for years to come
[3/10/2016]
Feb. 29, 2016
Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, contributed to research for an article about how growing up in poverty or being abused as a child can lead to accumulated health problems later in life. The findings are published in the American Sociological Review. Results were based on the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States data from 1,748 adults.
(FULL STORY)

MPR (Monthly Prescribing Reference): God and the Workplace, Study Examines Whether Practising a Faith Aids Workers
[3/10/2016]
March 9, 2016
People who feel attached to God are more likely to be emotionally committed to their workplace and satisfied with their jobs, according to a study led by new study by says a new study led by Blake Kent, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The attachment also may have a “spillover effect” against negativity and help people cope with workplace challenges, says Kent, who is quoted. The study was published in the Review of Religious Research. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story nationally. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Stone Hearth Newsletters: Parental abuse costs adults their health for years to come
[3/8/2016]
Feb. 29, 2016
Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, contributed to research for an article about how growing up in poverty or being abused as a child can lead to accumulated health problems later in life. The findings are published in the American Sociological Review. Results were based on analysis of data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States.
(FULL STORY)


News Archives