Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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The Daily American: 5 things to remember when you think God has abandoned you
[9/29/2014]
Sept. 25, 2014
Article about ways to keep the faith, no matter how tough things may get, cites recent research from Baylor that found that prayer can “keep you spiritual, or at the very least help you understand how you feel about your religion.” The research, published in the journal Sociology of Religion, was conducted by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who found that those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior than those who prayed but did not expect God to comfort or protect them. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and originally pitched this research nationally in August.)
(FULL STORY)

PsychCentral: New Study Examines the Effects of Prayer on Mental Health
[9/25/2014]
Sept. 19, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor study published in the journal Sociology of Religion. Those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior, said researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Spirituality and Health: Praying to a Loving God Guards Against Anxiety Disorders
[9/12/2014]
Sept. 9, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor University study published in the journal Sociology of Religion. It is perception that matters more, and those who saw God as loving and supportive were less likely to show symptoms such as worry, fear, dread and obsessive-compulsive behavior, said researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Christian Today: How you view God affects your prayer life and mental health
[8/28/2014]
Aug. 23, 2014
When it comes to prayer and easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, those who see God as loving and protective are more likely to find comfort and help than those who are insecure about their relationship with God, according to a Baylor University study. Quoted is researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers faculty and research in Baylor’s department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Aberdeen (SD) News: Hey moms: Your neighbor’s religion could determine whether you work
[8/28/2014]
Aug. 27, 2014
Religious influence in a community might affect whether or not a woman works, regardless of her own religious preferences, according to a Baylor University study by Aaron Franzen and Jenna Griebel. The researchers found that married women between the ages of 18 and 65 are more likely to work outside the home in communities that are predominantly mainline Protestant and black Protestant. Franzen is a former Baylor sociology researcher and Griebel is a research assistant in Baylor’s department of sociology in the College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers the sociology department and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Patheos.com: Does God Answer Prayer? Depends on Which God You Pray To, Study Says
[8/20/2014]
Aug. 14, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer has differing effects. How the praying person views God is more important than frequency and style of prayer, according to Baylor research funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Quoted is researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Associated Baptist Press: Sociologist: Concept of God impacts power of prayer, anxiety-related disorders
[8/20/2014]
Aug. 18, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer has differing effects. How the praying person views God is more important than frequency and style of prayer, according to Baylor research funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Quoted is researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, wrote and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Baptist Standard: Baylor Survey: Prayer not cure-all for anxiety disorders
[8/21/2014]
Aug. 15, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer has differing effects. How the praying person views God is more important than frequency and style of prayer, according to Baylor research funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Quoted is researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, wrote and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department to sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Science Codex: Surprising number of older adults weathered the 'Great Recession' without financial strain
[8/21/2014]
Aug. 18, 2014
More than 40 percent of older adults who lived through the “Great Recession” reported a decrease in financial strain, according to a study by Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of sociology in Baylor University's College of Arts & Sciences. She presented the research at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story. Goodrich, who covers research and faculty in the department of sociology, wrote a summary of study findings for the American Sociological Association.)
(FULL STORY)

Deseret News: 8 reasons why prayer is good for you
[8/19/2014]
Aug. 18, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer has differing effects. How the praying person views God is more important than frequency and style of prayer, according to Baylor research funded by the John Templeton Foundation and conducted by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Baylor is among five universities whose prayer research is cited. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department to sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Psych Central: How You Think of God Impacts Prayer’s Effect on Mental Health
[8/19/2014]
Aug. 14, 2014
When it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer has differing effects. How the praying person views God is more important than frequency and style of prayer, according to Baylor research funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Quoted is researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in the department to sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Yahoo! News: How US adults weathered 'Great Recession'
[8/19/2014]
Aug. 18, 2014
More than 40 percent of older adults who lived through the “Great Recession” reported a decrease in financial strain, according to a study by Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences. She presented the research at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story. Goodrich, who covers research and faculty in the department of sociology, wrote a summary of study findings for the American Sociological Association.)
(FULL STORY)

Psy Post: Wives and whether to work: Community religious beliefs play a part
[8/15/2014]
Aug. 6, 2014
A Baylor sociology study found that married women are more likely to choose not to work outside the home if they live in communities in which a higher proportion of the population belongs to conservative religious traditions. This is true even if the women do not “buy into” the belief that a wife’s primary role is that of homemaker. Quoted are researchers Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and Aaron Franzen, Ph.D., a former Baylor sociology researcher in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Medical Daily: Praying, Religion Doesn’t Always Reduce Stress; It Could Exacerbate Anxiety-Related Disorders
[8/15/2014]
Aug. 13, 2014
Prayer doesn’t work for everyone when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, according to Baylor researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., co-author of a new study in the journal Sociology of Religion. What mattered more than prayer was the type of attachment the praying person felt toward God, with those who felt secure in the relationship having fewer symptoms. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.)
(FULL STORY)

Surprising Number of Older Adults Weathered ‘The Great Recession’ Without Financial Strain, Baylor Study Finds
[8/18/2014]

(FULL STORY)

Surprising Number of Older Adults Weathered ‘The Great Recession’ Without Financial Strain, Baylor Study Finds
[8/18/2014]
WACO, Texas (Aug. 18, 2014) — The “Great Recession” may have put a dent in many older adults’ pocketbooks, but a new study by Baylor University found that more than 40 percent reported a decrease in “financial strain” between 2006 and 2010.
(FULL STORY)

Business Standard: Unanswered prayers may trigger anxiety
[8/14/2014]
Aug. 13, 2014
Prayer doesn’t work for everyone when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, according to Baylor researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., co-author of a new study in the journal Sociology of Religion. What mattered more than prayer was the type of attachment the praying person felt toward God, with those who felt secure in the relationship having fewer symptoms. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.)
(FULL STORY)

Yahoo! News: Unanswered prayers may trigger anxiety
[8/13/2014]
Aug. 13, 2014
Prayer doesn’t work for everyone when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, according to Baylor researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., co-author of a new study in the journal Sociology of Religion. What mattered more than prayer was the type of attachment the praying person felt toward God, with those who felt secure in the relationship having fewer symptoms. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.)
(FULL STORY)

The Atlantic: When Prayer Makes Anxiety Worse
[8/13/2014]
Aug. 13, 2014
Prayer doesn’t work for everyone when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, according to Baylor researcher Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., co-author of a new study in the journal Sociology of Religion. What mattered more than prayer was the type of attachment the praying person felt toward God, with those who felt secure in the relationship having fewer symptoms. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.)
(FULL STORY)

Anxiety and Amen: Prayer Doesn’t Ease Symptoms of Anxiety-Related Disorders for Everyone, Baylor Study Finds
[8/11/2014]
WACO, Texas (Aug. 12, 2014) — Whether the problem is health, enemies, poverty or difficulty with aging, “Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there,” suggested the late gospel musician Charles A. Tindley. But when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor University researcher.
(FULL STORY)

eScience News: Community religious beliefs influence whether wives work outside home, Baylor study finds
[8/8/2014]
Aug. 7, 2014
A Baylor sociology study found that married women are more likely to choose not to work outside the home if they live in communities in which a higher proportion of the population belongs to conservative religious traditions. This is true even if the women do not “buy into” the belief that a wife’s primary role is that of homemaker. Quoted are researchers Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and Aaron Franzen, Ph.D., a former Baylor sociology researcher in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Small Biz Survival: 7 Strengths of Small Town Businesses #7: Benefiting the Local Community
[8/7/2014]
Aug. 4, 2014
A study conducted by Charles M. Tolbert, Ph.D., professor and chair of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is featured in this article about why small businesses are important to a community. Tolbert’s research shows that locally-owned business establishments are associated statistically with higher average income levels, less income inequality, lower poverty levels, lower unemployment, less juvenile delinquency, less crime, lower levels of obesity and lower levels of diabetes. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director for Baylor Media Communications, pitched this original research to media outlets in February 2012. Goodrich is responsible for covering research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Business Standard: Conservative women less likely to work post-marriage
[8/7/2014]
Aug. 7, 2014
A Baylor sociology study found that married women are more likely to choose not to work outside the home if they live in communities in which a higher proportion of the population belongs to conservative religious traditions. This is true even if the women do not “buy into” the belief that a wife’s primary role is that of homemaker. Quoted are researchers Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and Aaron Franzen, Ph.D., a former Baylor sociology researcher in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (This story was placed by Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, who covers the department of sociology’s research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Why This Professor Is Encouraging Facebook Use in His Classroom
[8/5/2014]
Aug. 5, 2014
This article examines research by Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences, and Brita Andercheck, a teaching assistant and doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor, which showed that “cyberspace scholarship” can help students earn higher grades and develop better critical thinking. Students in the study who took part in a Facebook Learning Group also had a greater sense of belonging. The study was published in Teaching Sociology, a journal of the American Sociological Association. (This story was placed in The Chronicle of Higher Education through the efforts of Terry Goodrich, assistant director for Baylor Media Communications, who pitched Dougherty’s research to The Chronicle’s Wired Campus blog in late April. Goodrich is responsible for covering research and faculty in the department of sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Examiner.com: Evangelicals more likely to divorce than non-religious, study suggests
[7/21/2014]
July 20, 2014
Article mentions a Baylor University sociology study that suggests that evangelicals are more likely to divorce than those who claim no religion. The research was part of a report released by the Council on Contemporary Families. Baylor researchers included Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences; and Joshua Tom and Brita Andercheck, doctoral candidates in the department of sociology. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers the sociology department.)
(FULL STORY)

Christianity Today: Want to Love Your Job? Church Can Help, Study Says
[7/17/2014]
July 16, 2014
Feature on Baylor research - funded by the National Science Foundation - that looked at how church attendance and participation affects job satisfaction. Quoted in the article is Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Co-authors were Baylor researchers Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in sociology; Mitchell J. Neubert, Ph.D., associate professor and The Hazel and Harry Chavanne Chair of Christian Ethics in Business in the Hankamer School of Business; and Kevin D. Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications who is responsible for covering sociology, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Psypost.org: Sunday school teachers as ‘culture warriors’: Lay leaders in churches wield political clout
[7/15/2014]
July 12, 2014
Lay leaders in churches have political sway as “culture warriors,” according to research by Brandon Martinez, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences. His study, published in the journal Social Science Quarterly, was based on analysis of data from the 2005 wave of the Baylor Religion Survey. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications who is responsible for covering sociology, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Politico Magazine: Evangelicals Are Changing Their Minds on Gay Marriage
[7/8/2014]
July 7, 2014
A study conducted by Baylor researchers is mentioned in this article about the new age of “middle” evangelicals’ growing acceptance of same-sex marriages. Brandon Martinez, a sociology researcher in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences, and Lydia Bean, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology at Baylor, presented their study last fall. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed initial stories about the research.)
(FULL STORY)

The Baptist Standard: Church attendance affects job attitudes, Baylor study shows
[7/2/2014]
June 30, 2014
Feature on Baylor research funded by the National Science Foundation that looked at how church attendance and participation affects job satisfaction. Researchers are Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences; Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in sociology; Mitchell J. Neubert, Ph.D., associate professor and The Hazel and Harry Chavanne Chair of Christian Ethics in Business in the Hankamer School of Business; and Kevin D. Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Institute for Faith, Work & Economics: The Surprising Link between Church Attendance and Job Satisfaction
[7/3/2014]
June 27, 2014
Feature on Baylor research funded by the National Science Foundation that looked at how church attendance and participation affects job satisfaction. Researchers are Jerry Z. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences; Jenna Griebel Rogers, a doctoral candidate in sociology; Mitchell J. Neubert, Ph.D., associate professor and The Hazel and Harry Chavanne Chair of Christian Ethics in Business in the Hankamer School of Business; and Kevin D. Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

God on the Job: Church Attendance Is Not Enough to Affect Job Satisfaction and Commitment, Baylor Study Shows
[6/20/2014]

(FULL STORY)

Associated Baptist Press: Political polarization challenges U.S. churches, Baptist leaders say
[6/17/2014]
June 16, 2014
Many Americans have self-segregated along political and ideological lines, which isn’t surprising in a two-party political system and a media culture that focuses on conflict, said Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology and a research fellow with the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, is responsible for covering religion and sociology and arranged for ABP’s interview with Dr. Froese.)
(FULL STORY)

Pagosa Daily Post: A POSITIVE VIEW OF RURAL: Small Companies Are a Better Bet
[5/30/2014]
May 29, 2014
A column addressing the benefits of small businesses in small towns references research by Charles Tolbert, Ph.D., professor of sociology and chair of the sociology department in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Communications of the ACM: Cyber-Connected Students Net Higher Grades, Study Shows
[5/5/2014]
April 30, 2014
University students who used a Facebook group as part of a large sociology class did better on course assignments and felt a stronger sense of belonging, according to a Baylor study conducted by Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology, and researcher Brita Andercheck, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Campus Technology: Can Facebook Make Better Students?
[5/2/2014]
May 1, 2014
University students who used a Facebook group as part of a large sociology class did better on course assignments and felt a stronger sense of belonging, according to a Baylor University study. Quoted are Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology, and researcher Brita Andercheck, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Science Codex: Cyberspace scholarship nets higher grades, better thinking for class Facebook group
[5/1/2014]
April 28, 2014
University students who used a Facebook group as part of a large sociology class did better on course assignments and felt a stronger sense of belonging, according to a Baylor University study. Quoted are Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology, and researcher Brita Andercheck, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Yahoo News: Facebook is your new classroom teacher!
[5/1/2014]
April 29, 2014
University students who used a Facebook group as part of a large sociology class did better on course assignments and felt a stronger sense of belonging, according to a Baylor University study. Quoted are Kevin Dougherty, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology, and researcher Brita Andercheck, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

MSN Healthy Living: Religious music a high note for older Christians
[4/24/2014]
April 18, 2014
New research has found that listening to religious music among older Christians is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and increases in life satisfaction, self-esteem, and sense of control over their lives. In particular, listening to gospel music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and an increase in sense of control. The research article in The Gerontologist, titled “Listening to Religious Music and Mental Health in Later Life,” was co-authored by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers the sociology department.)
(FULL STORY)


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