Faculty - Mencken 7-2012


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Meet some of our faculty and learn more about their passion for teaching and devotion to their research.

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Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.

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Science Daily: Good relationships with parents may benefit children's health decades later
[9/27/2016]
September 20, 2016
New Baylor research published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior suggests that growing up in a well-off home can benefit a child’s long-term physical health, but a lack of parent-child warmth, or the presence of abuse, may eliminate the health advantage of a privileged background. The research was conducted by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

ResearchOnReligion.org: Paul Froese on the Meaning of Life
[9/27/2016]
Sept. 25, 2016
AUDIO: Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts & Sciences and resident scholar at the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor, discusses the meaning of life and how his book, “On Purpose: How We Create the Meaning of Life,” is designed to help people be more reflective on how they think about their purpose. The Research on Religion is a weekly podcast series devoted to the social scientific study of religion.
(FULL STORY)

U.S. News & World Report: Close bond between kids, parents has long-term health benefits
[9/21/2016]
Sept. 20, 2016
New Baylor research published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior suggests that growing up in a well-off home can benefit a child’s long-term physical health, but a lack of parent-child warmth, or the presence of abuse, may eliminate the health advantage of a privileged background. The research was conducted by Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Huffington Post: Saying ‘I do’ can reduce religious ties, but parenthood boosts rate of return for couples AND singles
[9/21/2016]
Sept. 20, 2016
New research by Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, finds that single parents, despite the risk of disapproval, are more likely than singles without children to return to church. “Single parents do seem to be coming back,” Uecker said. “When they were religious as teen-agers ... they find their way back as young adults.” The research was published in the latest issue of the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)


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