Department of Sociology
An Engaging Academic Environment
Sociology literally means the study of society, or of social things. It is a scientific approach to understanding human groups and human interaction. From families to neighborhoods to nation-states, human life is spent in the company of others. The theories and methods of sociology provide a means to analyze the social nature of human existence. Training in sociology is useful preparation for careers in business, law, government, ministry, medicine, and many more.
Why Baylor Sociology
Dating back to 1919, Baylor’s sociology program offers a legacy of distinguished service, high caliber scholarship, exemplary teaching, and unique opportunities to its students. At Baylor, you will take classes taught by top scholars and have opportunities for independent research.
Undergraduate Programs
An attractive aspect of our program is its flexibility. You customize your sociological studies in keeping with your interests and ambitions.
Graduate Programs
The Department of Sociology at Baylor University has a productive faculty committed to the mentorship and collaborative research with students.
Research Areas
Research is an important aspect of graduate study at Baylor and, by the end of their second year, Sociology doctoral students will begin engaging in an in-depth research project. Our graduate students have been published in Social Forces, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion and Social Science Quarterly. Their work also has been selected by notable new outlets such as The Huffington Post, USA Today and The Washington Post. There has never been a better time to study sociology at Baylor.
Careers in
Sociology
The knowledge and analytical skills of sociology make our graduates broadly marketable. More than half of our alumni build a career upon their undergraduate degree. About a third eventually pursues some type of graduate education, such as sociology, social work, seminary, business administration, law, or medical. Private laboratories, foundations, and research centers offer opportunities for those who study sociology and health.
Sociology
In the News
Tampa General Hospital: Too Often, Caring for Aging Parent Means Trouble at Work Jul. 10, 2019 July 8, 2019 Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, according to a study by Matthew Andersson, assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Research published in the Journal of Aging and Health showed that work disruptions range from mild, such as adjusting work hours, to severe. Severe disruptions include moving from full- to part-time jobs, taking a leave of absence or even early retirement. Read More HealthDay: Too Often, Caring for Aging Parent Means Trouble at Work Jul. 8, 2019 July 8, 2019 Many adults with full-time jobs who care for an aging parent face significant work disruptions and lack employer support, according to a new Baylor study in the Journal of Aging and Health. The study, led by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, included 642 workers at a public university who were unpaid caregivers for seniors – typically parents, spouses or friends. HealthDay is a leading syndicated provider of health-related news and research. Read More MSN: Scientists Have a Plan to Make Humans Accept Robots: Give Them a Sense of Humor Jul. 3, 2019 July 1, 2019 This article on how scientists are making robots appear more relatable cites a study conducted by Baylor University sociologist Paul McClure that found that a growing number of people were “technophobic,” meaning they have a fear of losing their jobs to automation. Read More McKnight’s Senior Living: How to care for the unpaid caregivers in your workforce Jul. 1, 2019 July 1, 2019 This article, aimed at those who work as caregivers in long-term care communities, cites a recent Baylor study about challenges facing people with elder caregiving responsibilities outsideof work. “Given that recruiting and retaining workers are two of the biggest challenges facing senior living operators, it’s worth listening to what these researchers have to say,” the article notes. The study, led by Matthew Andersson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, found that workers with unmet needs related to their caregiving more frequently needed to adjust work hours, move from a full-time to a part-time position or take a leave of absence or even early retirement compared. Some of those needs could be met by workplace programs, flexibility and communication. Read More
Our Faculty
Spotlight

Department of Sociology

Burleson Building
One Bear Place #97326
Waco, TX 76798-7326

(254) 710-1165