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St. Andrews' Professor, John Haldane, Lectures

April 24, 2014

John Haldane, Professor of Philosophy at St. Andrews University and Director of the Centre for Ethics, Philosophy and Public Affairs, will be presenting two lectures during the week of April 28-May 2.

Professor Haldane will present a lecture on Tuesday, April 29 in Dr. David Jeffrey's Philosophy and the Arts course, 9:30-10:45 am. He will speak about the Thomistic account of beauty and aesthetic experience and how it relates to modern and recent notions of art, beauty, aesthetic experience and the like. This lecture is not open to the public.

In addition, Professor Haldane will give a lecture entitled, "Virtue Ethics: Anscombe Revisited," at 3:30 pm, Wednesday, April 30, in Morrison Hall 108. This lecture is open to the public.

Educated at St Aloysius College in Scotland and at the University of the Arts and the University of London, where he took BA degrees in Fine Art (1st Class), and in Philosophy (1st Class), a Post-graduate Certificate in Education, and a PhD in Philosophy, John Haldane taught art for three years in St Joseph’s Convent school (London), and was a visiting lecturer for in the Architecture School of the University of Westminster, before taking up a position in the University of St Andrews in 1983.

Haldane is Professor of Philosophy at St Andrews University and Director of the Centre for Ethics, Philosophy and Public Affairs. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and Chairman of the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

He has held the Royden Davis Chair in Humanities at Georgetown University (2001-02), and been Stanton Lecturer in Cambridge University (1999-2002), Gifford Lecturer at Aberdeen University (2004-05), Joseph Lecturer at the Gregorian University in Rome (2005) and MacDonald Lecturer in the University of Oxford (2011). He has also held fellowships at the universities of Pittsburgh (1987), Edinburgh (1989, 91, 93, 2009) and Oxford (1992) and been visiting professor at several US institutions and is a Senior Fellow of the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton (2006-present). In 2013-14 he is Senior Remick Fellow in the Center for Ethics and Culture at the University of Notre Dame.

John Haldane has published over 200 academic papers in history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind, metaphysics, and moral and social philosophy. He is co-author of Atheism and Theism in Blackwell’s ‘Tomorrow’s Classics’ list, and author of An Intelligent Person’s Guide to Religion (Duckworth). He has produced two volumes of essays on philosophy and religion entitled Faithful Reason (2006) and Reasonable Faith (2010) (Routledge); and a volume on ethics entitled Practical Philosophy (2009). He also has two collections intended for general readers: Seeking Meaning and Making Sense (2008), and The Church and the World (2008) – a follow up to Seeking Meaning, Arts and Minds will be published in 2013.

In addition to his academic work, John Haldane also writes for newspapers and periodicals and appears on radio and television. For several years he contributed a monthly ‘Credo’ column in the (London) Times, as well as publishing in the (Glasgow) Herald, the Sunday Herald and the Scotsman. He also writes art reviews and articles for Art Book, Art and Christianity, Art Monthly, Burlington Magazine, Modern Painters, and other international art journals. In that connection he is a former fellow of the Henry Moore Institute (1998-9) established for the study of 20th century British sculpture. He is a frequent contributor to BBC Radio and television.

John Haldane has served on several committees of enquiry including UK Victim Support Working Party on Victim Compensation; the Nuffield Council on Bioethics Working Party on Genetics and Mental Disorder, and a Scottish National Health Service Working Party on Taking Difficult Decisions in Health Care. He has been a member of the Philosophy, Law and Religious Studies panel of the UK National Arts and Humanities and Research Board.

In 1997 he received an honorary LL.D. from St Anselm College, New Hampshire, USA, and in 2008 he was awarded an honorary D.Litt from the University of Glasgow in recognition of his 'outstanding contribution to moral philosophy'. In 2005 he was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI as a Consultor to the Pontifical Council for Culture, and reappointed as such in 2011. He is also a member of the Pontifical Academy of Thomas Aquinas.