[Couple Fighting]
WACO, Texas (Sept. 29, 2015) – Research from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business confirms that cellphones are damaging romantic relationships and leading to higher levels of depression.
[Workday Break]
WACO, Texas (Sept. 9, 2015) – Most people take breaks during their workdays. Coffee breaks. Lunch breaks. Short chats with coworkers. Maybe late afternoon walks around the building. But are they taking the best type of breaks? Breaks that boost energy, concentration and motivation?
[Grief and babies]
WACO, Texas (Sept. 8, 2015) — With the rate of stillbirths now topping that of infants who die before their first birthdays, employers — and society in general — must become more empathetic to families grieving the death of a baby through stillbirth or miscarriage, says a Baylor researcher who helped form Cradled, a Waco-based nonprofit serving bereaved families.
WACO, Texas (Sept. 3, 2015) — A recent study by a multi-disciplinary team of Baylor University researchers found that a popular herbicide does not appear to have a long-term, measurable impact on aquatic plant life.
[equality and homicide]
WACO, Texas (Aug. 25, 2015) — The greater a country’s gender equality when it comes to employment, the higher the overall homicide rate, an international Baylor study has found. The "why" is uncertain, but prior research suggests it may be due to threatening male status.
WACO, Texas (Aug. 20, 2015) — People with psychopathic characteristics are less likely to be affected by “contagious yawning” than those who are empathetic, according to a Baylor University psychology study.
[Multiracial congregations]
WACO, Texas (Aug. 17, 2015) — Troubling questions about multiracial congregations’ potential to address racial inequality are raised by a new national study done by researchers at Baylor University, the University of Southern California and the University of Chicago.
WACO, Texas (Aug. 5, 2015) — Counties with more beautiful weather and scenery have lower rates of membership and affiliation with religious organizations, according to Baylor researchers.
[SSW Religion Spirituality]
WACO, Texas (July 8, 2015) – New research by a Baylor University professor shows that licensed clinical social workers believe that discussions about their clients’ religion and spirituality can often lead to improved health and mental health, but practitioners are not integrating these conversations into their counseling sessions.
[Joe Kuehl]
WACO, Texas (May 27, 2015) – Joseph Kuehl, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering in Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science, has received a $359,000 research grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Research Program to study physics-based hypersonic boundary-layer stability and transition prediction.
[Shopping Abstract]
WACO, Texas (May 21, 2015) – Here’s the skinny: Not all women will buy products because the models in the advertisements are thin, according to a new study of a diverse group of 239 women by a Baylor University marketing professor.
WACO, Texas (May 11, 2015) — Corporate communicators and marketing teams are often in direct competition to be in the “C-suite” — the coveted boardroom seats — according to a study by a Baylor University researcher.
WACO, Texas (April 15, 2015) – Baylor University’s Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences, Department of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation (HHPR), along with partners from Texas A&M University’s School of Public Health (lead on the overall project), New Mexico State University, the Mariposa Community Health Center in Arizona, and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service have received a five-year, $4.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to improve the lives and families living along the U.S.-Mexico border.
[Paradise and tan]
WACO, Texas (April 14, 2015) — Tanning as “paradise” — the depiction in ads and magazines of smiling people sporting even tans and often enjoying exotic vacation spots — may influence people to tan in the sun or tanning beds and take risks with UV ray exposure and ultimately, skin cancer, says a Baylor University researcher.
WACO, Texas (March 23, 2015) — A youth violence-reduction mentoring program for trouble-plagued schools in urban centers has contributed to improved student behavior and performance at high-risk middle and high schools in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Richmond, Virginia, according to findings of a new Baylor University case study.
[Jim West Research iStock Photo]
WACO, Texas (March 3, 2015) – A new working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research, authored by researchers from Baylor University, Texas A&M University and the University of California-Davis, examines the attitudes and preferences of white males toward black males by analyzing what affects the probability of choosing a black roommate at the U.S. Air Force Academy.
[Operation Desert Storm]
WACO, Texas (Feb. 27, 2015) — February 28 marks the 24th anniversary of the cease fire that ended the 1991 Gulf War, also known as Operation Desert Storm. But the end of the war signaled the beginning of a new struggle for thousands of service men and women—their personal battle with Gulf War illness (GWI).
[China's Hunshandake Sandy Lands]
WACO, Texas (Feb. 16, 2015) — Using a relatively new scientific dating technique, a Baylor University geologist and a team of international researchers were able to document—for the first time—a drastic climate change 4,200 years ago in northern China that affected vegetation and led to mass migration from the area.
[Sex and older]
WACO, Texas (Feb. 16, 2015) — While people in the early years of marriage have sex more frequently, and their sexual activity tapers off over time, a modest rebound occurs for those whose marriages endure longer than half a century, according to new research. The study also found that people who remain in their first marriages have sex more often than those who remarry.
[sexual abuse]
WACO, Texas (Feb. 3, 2015) — College women who have been sexually victimized not only fear their attackers — or those similar to them — but often have trouble trusting anyone after being assaulted. But religion can help them cope and overcome the emotional damage, according to Baylor University research.
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