Baylor University Poage Library

About George Moffett


George Clarence Moffett
Portrait of George Clarence Moffett

Headstone Text


George C. Moffett

Nov. 20, 1895
Jan. 4, 1972

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Moffett
State Representative
1931 - 1938
State Senator
1939 - 1965
Grand Master
of Masons in Texas
1955
Full Name: George Clarence Moffett
AKA: Cotton Moffett
Location: Section:Republic Hill, Section 1 (C1)
Row:B  Number:3
Reason for Eligibility: Member, Texas House of Representatives; Member and President Pro Tempore, Texas Senate; Member, Midwestern University Board of Regents 
Birth Date: November 20, 1895 
Died: January 4, 1972 
Buried: January 7. 1972 
Biography:

MOFFETT, GEORGE CLARENCE "COTTON" (1895 ~ 1972). George Clarence "Cotton" Moffett was born November 20, 1895 to Frank Lee and Ina Farington Moffett, north of Chillicothe, Texas. Growing up in Northwest Texas, Senator Moffett attended a one room rural school at Center Point for six years and then finished in Chillicothe where he graduated with the class of 1911.

After graduation, Moffett sought additional training in Chico, Wise County, Texas, where he graduated with honors in 1912 and then enrolled in Texas A&M College. At A&M, he pursued a degree in agriculture, specializing in animal husbandry. For academic achievement, Moffett was named a distinguished student his senior year. He was also a cadet infantry captain.

Moffett was one of 117 members of the A&M graduating class of 1916. During World War I Moffett served in the infantry and Air Service. After the war, he returned home and worked in the oil business. Moffett also managed the Rounds and Porter Lumber Co. in Graham, Texas.

In 1923, Moffett moved back to Chillicothe where he managed the family farm for more than forty years. Moffett worked the family farm full-time until 1930 when he entered politics as a state representative. He served eight years in the House and was then elected as a member of the Texas Senate in 1939.

Moffett was a leader in agricultural legislation and vigorously espoused a principle, which expanded and increased scientific research for new markets for agricultural products. Long known as a champion of agricultural causes, Moffett served the 23rd Senatorial District from 1939 until his retirement in late 1964.

During his 34 years in the Texas Legislature, Moffett became closely identified with agricultural, livestock, oil, gas and veterans legislation. His vigorous efforts on behalf of the cotton industry earned him the nickname "Cotton," by which he was widely known. Moffett sponsored legislation that made Midwestern University a four-year; state supported school and was on its board of regents when he died on January 4, 1972.

Moffett was buried at the Texas State Cemetery for his lifelong service to the State of Texas.

http://www.cemetery.state.tx.us

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