Baylor University Poage Library

FAQ


1. What kinds of primary sources are in the collections?
2. Which of these sources lend themselves well to thesis research?
3. What graduate research has been done in the past based on the materials in the collections?
4. If I had to write a thesis based on materials in the collections, which two or three projects seem the most promising?
5. Are tours of the collections for interested students and researchers offered?
6. What are your times and days of operation?
7. Is the Bob Bullock Archive available for research?
8. Why can't maps and some cartoons be accessed online?
9. Does the library have student jobs and assistantships?

Bullock

1. Why doesn't the video play when I click on it?
2. Why I can't find Bullock materials in the online catalog?
3. Do Bullock Archive materials circulate through TexShare?




1. What kinds of primary sources are in the collections?
The Poage Legislative library contains the personal and political papers of twelve former U. S. Congressmen, four judges, several Texas legislators, a Mayor of Waco, a former Lieutenant Governor of Texas, and various other ancillary papers such as editorial cartoons, map and JFK assassination materials.

2. Which of these sources lend themselves well to thesis research?
Most of the collections now have finding aids that describe and list the contents of the papers. A Baylor law professor and his son used a number of different types of primary resources including newsletters, newspapers, videos, oral memoirs, speeches, scrapbooks, maps, photos, and personal papers for research on the early history of the Rural Electrification Administration. Any of the collections could be used for similar research.

3. What graduate research has been done in the past based on the materials in the collections?
An LSU graduate student used library resources for his thesis on U.S. House leadership controversy in 1975 and for his dissertation on the 1980s budget. A Baylor graduate student used the Poage papers to write a biography of Poage. An A&M graduate student used the collections to write a paper on the heated Poage-Cross campaign of 1940. The head of TCU history department spent a week researching "Cotton since 1945." The head of ETBC history department has visited several times researching the life of Congressman Sam Hall. A graduate student from England spent a week researching the Gun Control Act of 1965. Dr. William Leuchtenburg from the University of North Carolina used several congressional collections for information on American presidents and the South. Several students have used the papers of the Mayor of Waco for research about Cameron Park Zoo, Cottonwood Golf Course, and The Texas Rangers' Museum. A student at the School in Economics in Stockholm requested editorial cartoons about Italy. A Ph.D. student in Australia requested editorial cartoons about Japan. A Baylor graduate student used the Poage Papers to write her thesis on Central Freight. A Baylor graduate student used the Dowdy Papers to write a thesis on the trial and conviction of Congressman Dowdy. A law firm in Dallas used campaign materials related to judges for a court case.

4. If I had to write a thesis based on materials in the collections, which two or three projects seem the most promising?
The Poage Legislative Library compiled a list of Suggested Research Topics in 1996 which has been placed on the library web page.

This site lists 160 topics that could be researched extensively using library resources. These include such varied subjects as Agriculture, Fort Hood, Humane Slaughter, Immigration/Displaced Persons, Interparliamentary Union, Palestine, REA, Simpson-Mazzoli Act, Texas Tidelands, and Urban Renewal.

Narrowing the focus down to just two or three projects, you might research:

John Kennedy and assassination conspiracy theorists.

Palestine and the Establishment of Israel.

Bob Bullock and the Texas state income tax amendment.

5. Are tours of the collections for interested students and researchers offered?

The staff of the Baylor Collections of Political Materials would be pleased to offer tours of our resources at any time. The The library is located in the W. R. Poage Legislative Library between Moody and Jones libraries.

Please contact us to let us know you are coming or tour our website for a condensed view of collections titles.

6. What are your times and days of operation?
The collections are generally open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-Fri. except major holidays. To ensure a particular collection will be available, please contact us.

7. Is the Bob Bullock Archive available for research?
Yes, the collection is officially opened in Summer 2004. A small amount of Bullock political memorabilia can be viewed in the exhibit area in Poage Library and there is an extensive Bullock web page:

8. Why can't maps and some cartoons be accessed online?
Only a part of our extensive political cartoon collection has been digitized. Many other political collections contain sketches, doodles, and cartoons that have been included in each Photographs section. Maps have not yet been transferred to digital format. If you see a cartoon title or map that interests you, please contact us to ask about duplication. For large quantities, copying charges may apply.

9. Does the library have student jobs and assistantships?
Current Baylor students may apply for work study positions and Bullock Archive assistantships.

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Bullock

1. Why doesn't the video play when I click on it?
Your computer must have QuickTime player installed to play the videos on this site. To download the latest version of QuickTime, click here.

2. Why I can't find Bullock materials in the online catalog?
Some materials are not cataloged online. Contact the Bullock Archive Project Director to discuss your project.

3. Do Bullock Archive materials circulate through TexShare?
No. All materials in the Bullock Archive must be viewed at the archive.

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