Baylor University
Department of History
College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Jeffrey S. Hamilton, Chair Tidwell Bible Building, 2nd Floor, Waco, TX 76798 | 254-710-2667

Luis X. Morera

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Luis X. Morera

Lecturer in History

Office: Tidwell B01 (hours) Phone: (254) 710-6160 Luis_Morera@baylor.edu

Lecturer in History

Specialties:


World History, (Comparative) Iberian History, Civic and Royal Ceremonies, Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Education:

  • PhD, University of Minnesota, 2010

Biography:

Dr. Morera spent half his growing years in Spain, and half of them in Texas. Thus, he considers himself to be "half paella, and half chicken-fried steak," and his dual identity has shaped his approach to history. He completed his Master's at the University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Alison Frazier, and his PhD at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, under the direction of Carla Rahn Phillips and William D. Phillips, Jr.-two Spanish historians of world renown.

Academic Interests and Research:


Dr. Morera is an enthusiastic teacher who wants his students to acquire not only content knowledge, but also an appreciation for history and research. He has broad academic interests, including World History, Spanish History, ritual and ceremony, gender, and expansionism. He is currently designing courses on Medieval Spain; Spectacle and Ceremony in Europe, 1350-1550; and European Expansionism: Travel, Hegemony, and Exchange. His research primarily focuses on social and cultural history, although it incorporates discussions and methods from a variety of other fields and disciplines, including art history, psychology, gender theory, and economic history. His dissertation (Cities and Sovereigns: Ceremonial Receptions of Iberia as Viewed from Below, 1350-1550) provides a reassessment of the relationship between cities and sovereigns, as seen through the lens of ceremonial receptions of royalty. Rather than approach these ceremonies from the traditional perspective of royal "propaganda," this project views them from below. By employing cost-benefit analysis, along with copious data from a dozen municipal archives (as a corrective to royally-sponsored narrative chronicles), the study is able to asses what ceremonial receptions meant to the cities and their hinterlands in terms of economic realities, administrative capacity, social impact, and micro-politics. The new dynamic model of the city-sovereign relationship it advances has implications for the colonial and dynastic projects in Europe and Early America.

Selected Research Articles:

  • "An Inherent Rivalry between Letrados and Caballeros? Alonso de Cartagena, the Knightly Estate, and an Historical Problem," Mediterranean Studies, 16 (2007): pp. 67-93.
  • Currently writing articles on both the rhetoric and phenomenology of ceremonial receptions.

Books:

    Currently revising Cities and Sovereigns: Ceremonial Receptions of Iberia as Viewed from Below, 1350-1550 for publication as his first book.

Courses Taught at Baylor

    HIS 1307 World History since 1500

Luis_Morera@baylor.edu

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