Baylor University
Department of Classics
College of Arts and Sciences

Baylor > Welcome > Courses > Fall 2013 Courses


Fall 2013 Courses


Explore courses in Classics, Greek, or Latin.

Classics Courses

Courses with a CLA designation introduce students to broad topics in Classical Antiquity using sources in English translation. All courses count toward the 36 hours of advanced credit required for graduation, regardless of major. The Classical Mythology course also counts toward the Fine Arts requirement for B.A. and B.S.W. students.

CLA courses are an excellent opportunity for Classics, Greek, and Latin majors to explore the larger historical and cultural setting of the literature that we read in the original language. Discuss specific course options and how they will apply to your degree plan and career goals with your faculty advisor.

CLA 3353, Roman Art (Cross-listed as ART 3353) - MWF, 12:20-1:10 pm in Morrison 330

A study of Roman art from the Republic to around A.D. 330 with special consideration given to an analysis of its artistic forms and their social and political meaning. The instructor, Dr. Nathan Elkins, specializes Greek and Roman art generally, and Roman coinage and political iconography in particular.

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you are interested in the material culture of Rome and its legacy in later western art.

CLA 3380, Classical Mythology - Multiple Sections

This course will introduce you to the major mythological cycles of ancient Greece and Rome. Class typically consists of selected readings from our primary sources (e.g. Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil, Ovid, etc.) and discussion. Other elements of the course may include examination of the ties between myth and religion, comparative approaches to mythology, myth as history, myth and literature, reception of the mythology in later western tradition (especially the artistic tradition), and other topics of interest.

Available Sections

  • MWF, 8:00-8:50 am, Morrison 120, with Dr. Brent Froberg
  • MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Morrison 120, with Dr. Brent Froberg
  • TR, 9:30-10:45 am, Morrison 120, with Dr. Joseph DiLuzio
  • TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, Morrison 120, with Dr. Ken Jones

Dr. Froberg specializes in Greek prose (with an emphasis on historians), Dr. DiLuzio in Roman rhetoric, and Dr. Jones in ancient history (with an emphasis on Roman Syria).

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you are interested in ancient poetry, art history of any period, western literature of all period, drama, music history, and comparative religion, to name a few. It is no exaggeration to say that the stories you will learn in this class will travel with you well beyond Baylor and that you will see echoes (ranging from the sublime to the ridiculous) all around us.

CLA 3381, Medical Terminology - Multiple Sections

This course transform the way you read medical terms. Instead of memorizing long, confusing words, you will learn to break their meaning apart according to the Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, and stems from which they are formed. In the process, this course will also challenge you to think in new ways about medicine and the human body, for these word elements come from times and cultures very different from our own.

Available Sections

  • MWF, 10:10-11:00 am, Morrison 120, with Dr. David White
  • MWF, 1:25-2:15 pm, Morrison 120, with Dr. David White

Mr. White specializes in Latin poetry and is currently completing his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Florida; Dr. Froberg specializes in Greek prose (with an emphasis on historians).

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you are planning on entering the health field in any capacity.

Return to top

Greek Courses

GKC and GKB courses are dedicated to teaching Classical (GKC) and Biblical (GKB) Greek. All first and second year Greek courses count toward the standard Baylor language requirement (typically 4 semesters, but see the current Undergraduate Catalog for the requirements specific to your degree path).

Students seeking only to complete a language requirement should plan on completing all four semesters in the same language. If you have a specific reason to divide your requirement with Latin or Hebrew, discuss this plan with a your Greek instructor before classes begin or early in your first semester.

Upper-level Greek classes are the reward for the labors of the early courses. Students can read specific works closely in the original language and with significant attention to literary and historical context. All 3000-4000 level courses satisfy requirements with the Classics, Greek, and Latin major and minor.

It is our departmental conviction is that the best path to a firm command of Biblical Greek is through a strong foundation in Classical Greek. Accordingly, we typically offer the corresponding courses in each track as concurrent sections. Students who begin Greek under the GKB designation will continue their first two years of Greek study on the GKB track; students who begin under GKC, with the GKC track.

GKC / GKB 1301, Elementary Greek - Multiple Sections

This course will begin introducing you to the fundamentals necessary to read Classical and Biblical Greek. In the first semester, this entails significant memorization of vocabulary, word formation, and core grammar rules. In the process, you can also expect to improve your command of English.

Available Sections

  • 01, MWF, 10:10-11:00 am, Sid Richardson 321, with Dr. Timothy Heckenlively
  • 02, MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Sid Richardson 343, with Dr. Simon Burris
  • 03, MWF, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm, Sid Richardson 226, with Dr. Simon Burris
  • 05, MWF, 12:20-1:10 pm, Morrison 330, STAFF
  • HONORS, MWF, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm, Sid Richardson 321, with Dr. Timothy Heckenlively

Drs. Burris and Heckenlively both specialize in different aspects of Archaic Greek Literature (lyric poetry, Hesiod and epic tradition, respectively).

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you seek to learn Ancient and/or Biblical Greek.

GKC / GKB 1302, Elementary Greek II - MWF 11:15 am - 12:05 pm in Sid Richardson 204

Prerequites - Successful completion of GKC or GKB 1301 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course

This course will continue building on the skills you acquired in Greek 1301. This semester will cover word formation and grammar, continue to build vocabulary, and begin to introduce more complex reading samples. The instructor, Dr. Brent Froberg, specializes in Greek prose (with an emphasis on historians).

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing Greek 1301. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in first semester should consider retaking the 1301 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

GKC / GKB 2310, Intermediate Greek Prose - Multiple Sections.

Prerequites - Successful completion of GKC or GKB 1302 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course

In this course you will give your new skills a good workout by reading several texts in their original language with close attention to vocabulary, grammar, and the overall thought of the work in question. Reading selections typically include readings from Plato or Lysias, together with Christian material (typically from Acts, the Gospels, or one of the shorter Pauline epistles).

  • 01, TR, 12:30-1:45 pm, Morrison 330, with Dr. Simon Burris
  • 02, MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Sid Richardson 204, with Dr. Timothy Heckenlively

Drs. Burris and Heckenlively both specialize in different aspects of Archaic Greek Literature (lyric poetry, Hesiod and epic tradition, respectively).

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing Greek 1302. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in second semester should consider retaking the 1302 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

GKC / GKB 2320, Intermediate Greek - TR, 9:30-1045 am in Sid Richardson 321

Prerequites - Successful completion of GKC or GKB 2310 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course

In this course you will being discovering the joy of reading Homer in the original through a selection of readings from the Odyssey. You will also discover answers to morphological mysteries from the first year of Greek. Students in Biblical Greek, through Homer, will become acquainted with the archaizing language of learned men that permeated the Greek of the Septuagint and, thereby, the New Testament. The instructor, Dr. Brent Froberg, specializes in Greek prose (with an emphasis on historians).

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing Greek 2310. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in third semester should consider retaking the 2310 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

GKC / GKB 4301, Readings from Greek Literature: Readings on Ancient Kingship

Prerequites - Successful completion of GKC or GKB 2320 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course. Instructor approval also required.

This course will explore ancient political ideas about good kingship though selections Homer and other others. The instructor, Dr. Fish, specializes in Hellenistic interpretation of Homer and in papryology

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you have a strong interest in Homer, ancient philosophy, or ancient political theory.

Return to top

Latin Courses

LAT is the designation for Latin. All first and second year Latin courses count toward the standard Baylor language requirement (typically 4 semesters, but see the current Undergraduate Catalog for the requirements specific to your degree path).

Students seeking only to complete a language requirement should plan on completing all four semesters in the same language. If you have a specific reason to divide your requirement with Latin or Hebrew, discuss this plan with a your Latin instructor before classes begin or early in your first semester.

Upper-level Latin classes are the reward for the labors of the early courses. Students can read specific works closely in the original language and with significant attention to literary and historical context. All 3000-4000 level courses satisfy requirements with the Classics, Greek, and Latin major and minor.

LAT 1301, Elementary Latin - Multiple Sections

This course will begin introducing you to the fundamentals necessary to read Classical Latin. In the first semester, this entails significant memorization of vocabulary, word formation, and core grammar rules. In the process, you can also expect to improve your command of English significantly. The instructor for both sections, Mr. White, specializes in Latin poetry.

Available Sections

  • 01, MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Sid Richardson 206, with Dr. Dan Hanchey
  • 02, MWF, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm, Sid Richardson 226, with Dr. Joseph DiLuzio
  • 04, TR, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, Sid Richardson 321, with Lena Borisova
  • 05, TR, 9:30-10:45 am, Sid Richardson 204, with Dr. Jeff Hunt
  • 08, TR, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, Sid Richardson 204, STAFF
  • 09, TR, 12:30-1:45 pm, Sid Richardson 321, STAFF
  • 10, MWF, 10:10-11:00 am, Sid Richarson 226, STAFF
  • HONORS, MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Morrison 330, with Dr. Julia Hejduk

Dr. Hejduk has written extensively on Augustan age poetry. Drs. Hanchey and DiLuzio are both specialists on Cicero and the Late Republic. The former focuses on Cicero as philosopher, the later on Cicero as orator and politician. Dr. Hunt specializes in Hellenistic poetry. Ms. Borisova is a Baylor doctoral candidate in Religion.

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you seek to learn Classical Latin.

LAT 1302, Elementary Latin II - Multiple Sections

Prerequites - Successful completion of GKC or GKB 1301 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course.

This course will continue building on the skills you acquired in LAT 1301. This semester will cover additional word formation and grammar, continue to build vocabulary, and begin to introduce more complex reading samples.

Available Sections

  • 01, TR, 8:00-9:15 am, Morrison 330, with Dr. David White
  • 02, TR, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, Morrison 330, with Dr. David White

Dr. White specializes in Silver Age Latin epic.

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing LAT 1301. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in first semester should consider retaking the 1301 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

LAT 2310, Intermediate Latin: Prose - Multiple Sections

Prerequites - Successful completion of LAT 1302 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course.

In this course you will give your new skills a good workout by reading several texts in their original language with close attention to vocabulary, grammar, and the overall thought of the work in question. Reading selections typically include readings from Cicero and the Vulgate.

  • 01, MWF, 9:05-9:55 am, Morrison 106, with Dr. Alden Smith
  • 03, MWF, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm, Morrison 330, with Dr. Meghan DiLuzio
  • 04, TR, 12:30-1:45 pm, Morrison 110, with Dr. Joseph DiLuzio
  • 05, MWF, 1:25-2:15 pm, Morrison 330, with Dr. Meghan DiLuzio

Dr. Smith has written multiple books and articles on Virgil. Dr. Hall works on Archaic Greek poetry and intertextuality. Dr. Meghan DiLuzio, specializes in Roman social history. Dr. Joseph DiLuzio works on Cicero and the politics of Republican Rome.

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing LAT 1302. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in second semester should consider retaking the 1302 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

LAT 2320, Intermediate Latin: Poetry - MWF, 11:15 am - 12:05 pm, Sid Richardson 225

Prerequites - Successful completion of LAT 2310 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course.

In this course you will being discovering the joy of reading Latin poetyr in the original through a selection of readings from Virgil's Aeneid of the poems of Catullus. The instructor is Dr. Hanchey, whose research focuses on the philosophical works of Cicero.

Who should take this course?
You should plan to take this continuation course as soon as possible after passing LAT 2310. Students who received a D(eficient) grade in second semester should consider retaking the 2310 course. Discuss your specific situation with your instructor.

LAT 3308, Reading in Imperial Epic - MWF, 10:10-11:00 am, Morrison 313

Prerequistes - Successful completion of LAT 2320 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course.

Study of imperial epic poetry (selections from Lucan, Statius, Silius, Valerius Flaccus) and its significance for the development of Roman imperial ideology. The instructor, Dr. Hejduk, has written extensively on themes in Latin poetry of this period.

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you love Latin poetry and reflections on relationship between art and prevailing culture.

LAT 3390, Medieval Latin Prose, TR, 9:30-10:45 am, Morrison 313

Prerequistes - Successful completion of LAT 2320 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for this course.

Selections from representative prose authors, including Peter Abelard, Bede, Ekkehard of Aura, Petrarch, Erasmus, Thomas More; review of inflection and syntax. The instructor, Dr. Nodes, is a specialist in Late Antiquity and in the intersection of Christianity and the Classical Tradition.

Who should take this course?
Consider taking this course if you have a strong interest in the Medieval period and want to some of the key differences between Classical and later Latin.

Return to top


0