Sonnets from the Portuguese, Sonnet 14

Charles J. Connick Associates, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts

Above the significant figures in blue, suggested by the line "When our two souls stand up erect and strong" from Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Sonnets from the Portuguese, Sonnet 22, is the six-winged seraph of divine love, with the flaming heart. The theme of love is emphasized by the angels below and by the many symbols throughout the border of red roses--the winged cupids, the dove, the palm and cypress trees, and the lilies.

Window - Sonnet 14

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's
Sonnets from the Portuguese, Sonnet 14

If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love's sake only. Do not say
'I love her for her smile ... her look ... her way
Of speaking gently, ... for a trick of thought
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A sense of pleasant ease on such a day'--
For these things in themselves, Belovèd, may
Be changed, or change for thee,--and love, so wrought,
May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry,--
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
But love me for love's sake, that evermore
Thou may'st love on, through love's eternity.

But love me for love's sake, that evermore
Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.

Dedicated to Mary Ann Kokernot Lacy

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Kokernot, Jr.