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Baylor > Judicial Affairs > Frequently Asked Questions > Responding to a Charge Letter



Responding to a Charge Letter

1. I received a letter from Judicial Affairs stating that I am accused of "misconduct." What does this mean?
2. Am I required to respond to my Charge Letter?
3. What if I was not aware my actions were against Baylor policy, and I did not mean to do anything wrong?
4. What if I did nothing wrong?
5. Since I did nothing wrong, why should I attend the preliminary conduct hearing with Judicial Affairs?




Responding to a Charge Letter

1. I received a letter from Judicial Affairs stating that I am accused of "misconduct." What does this mean?
It means that you are alleged to have been involved in some type of behavior or misconduct that is in violation of Baylor University policies. This letter is commonly referred to as a Charge Letter because it states the official charge against the student.

2. Am I required to respond to my Charge Letter?
No, you are not required; HOWEVER, if you do not respond, the student conduct officer has only one side of the incident. Therefore, in cases where the student does not respond, the student is almost always found "guilty" for the misconduct. In contrast, last year (2012- 2013) 37 charges were dropped due to students responding and telling their side. So, it is in your best interest to call the Judicial Affairs office and schedule an appointment by the deadline stated in the Charge Letter.

3. What if I was not aware my actions were against Baylor policy, and I did not mean to do anything wrong?
Every student is responsible for knowing the policies. Students are always encouraged to share their thoughts or rational about a violation even though ignorance of a policy will not suffice as justification for a violation. If you find yourself worrying about whether your conduct is OK or not, don't ignore your instincts----ask for clarification BEFORE you act.

4. What if I did nothing wrong?
Call and schedule an appointment by the deadline stated in your Charge Letter and during your preliminary conduct hearing, just relax and tell the truth about what you know and what happened. During the 2012-2013 school year, Judicial Affairs dropped the charges on 37 cases after students told their side of the story.

5. Since I did nothing wrong, why should I attend the preliminary conduct hearing with Judicial Affairs?
Once you are charged with misconduct, a decision must be made with or without you. If you choose not to respond, your side of the story will not be heard or taken into account. By not responding to your Charge Letter, you waive your right to a hearing. Should you choose this option and be found responsible for the misconduct, your only recourse at this point is to appeal your sanctions.

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