News

Mar
21
2019
March 19, 2019
The Center for Public Justice, based in Washington, D.C., recently named Austin junior Ana O’Quin one of three recipients of the 2019 Shared Justice Student-Faculty Research Prize. O’Quin is a student in Baylor’s Diana R. Garland School of Social Work. She and her research advisor, Stephanie Boddie, Ph.D., assistant professor of church and community ministries in the School of Social Work, will study Waco teenagers’ access to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, a national program that offers nutrition assistance to eligible, low-income individuals and families.
Mar
20
2019
WACO, Texas (March 20, 2019) – The Keston Center for Religion, Politics and Society at Baylor University, in partnership with the McBride Center for International Business in the Hankamer School of Business, will present a Diplomatic Forum at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 21, in rooms 143-144 of the Paul L. Foster Campus for Business and Innovation.
Mar
18
2019
March 14, 2019
William Reichenstein, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Investments in Baylor's Hankamer School of Business, is quoted in this article about the possibilities of Social Security reform and its impact on retirees.
Mar
18
2019
WACO, Texas (March 18, 2019) – Sara L. Dolan, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience in Baylor University’s College of Arts & Sciences, has been awarded a five-year grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – a branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – for a project aimed at improving clinical practice for children who have been victims of abuse and trauma.
Mar
15
2019
March 14, 2019
Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, is quoted in this article about different ways to address global warming and the partisan politics that revolve around the issue.
Feb
14
2019
Feb. 11, 2019
Leslie A. Hahner, Ph.D., associate professor of communication in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and Kansas State professor Heather Woods have combined their skills and areas of expertise to publish a book about memes and the impact they can have on social media and society. “Make America Meme Again” specifically looks at the 2016 presidential election and analyzes the use of memes as a method of persuasion for fringe alt-right groups. Hahner’s expertise lies in the use of propaganda and persuasive sources, and Woods acts as a digital rhetorician, where she uses rhetoric as a way to study digital communication.
Feb
11
2019
Feb. 9, 2019
Waco ISD changed the way it delivers breakfast to students with the help of Baylor University’s Texas Hunger Initiative, an organization that works across the state to coordinate efforts to battle hunger. THI found that serving breakfast after school starts doubles how many students eat breakfast, so Waco ISD’s Child Nutrition Services department started offering “grab bags” with a carton of milk or juice and a breakfast item available on carts set up near entrances or in ice chests in classrooms. Students can arrive at school, grab a bag on their way to class and eat there.
Feb
11
2019
Feb. 9, 2019
As the founder and inaugural director of the Texas Hunger Initiative, Jeremy Everett, M.Div. ’01, took to the road to map out the challenge ahead of him, quite literally. That challenge in 2009 took the shape of 5.5 million people in Texas without reliable access to nutritious food, called “food insecurity.” At the time, one in four children experienced food insecurity. The Texas Hunger Initiative is affiliated with Baylor University and partners with federal, state and local agencies to develop and implement strategies to combat hunger. This month, it celebrates its 10th anniversary.
Feb
6
2019
Feb. 1, 2019
Facebook political memes of President Donald Trump in the 2016 election focused more on his hairstyle and facial expressions, while those of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton dealt more with the email scandal and her relationships — a contrast to historical gender stereotypes in politics, according to a study led by Mia Moody-Ramirez, Ph.D., professor of journalism, public relations and new media in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.
Feb
6
2019
WACO, Texas (Feb. 6, 2019) – Kelly R. Ylitalo, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of public health in Baylor University’s Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences, has been awarded a prestigious career development grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the link between physical activity and healthy aging. The grant, valuing more than $626,000, will span a five-year project period.
Jan
31
2019
Jan. 21, 2019
Each semester, the Baylor in Washington program gives students the opportunity to study and work in Washington, D.C. Students earn credit while completing a fulltime internship and conducting a research project and paper on a topic of their choice.
Jan
30
2019
Jan. 29, 2019
This opinion piece about the advance of international religious freedom mentions a conference co-hosted by the Religious Freedom Institute and Baylor in Washington last year that commemorated the 20th anniversary of the International Religious Freedom Act. More than 250 scholars and religious freedom advocates met to discuss how to advance religious freedom and heard first-hand stories of persecution from Yazidis from Iraq, Rohingya from Burma, and Christians and Uyghur Muslims from China, and discussed the essential next steps to ensure religious freedom for all.
Jan
28
2019
Jan. 24, 2019
On Feb. 1-2, the Washington National Cathedral presents “A Long, Long Way Film Weekend,” a two-day event – co-sponsored by Austin Film Festival, Baylor University and The March On Washington Film Festival – designed to give cinephiles, activists and enthusiasts alike an opportunity to discuss the films of director Spike Lee with a panel of theologians, scholars, journalists and policymakers. Among the panelists is Greg Garrett, Ph.D., professor of English in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and author of more than 20 books on religion, politics, narrative, literature and popular culture.
Jan
28
2019
Jan. 24, 2019
On Feb. 1-2, the Washington National Cathedral presents “A Long, Long Way Film Weekend,” a two-day event – co-sponsored by Austin Film Festival, Baylor University and The March On Washington Film Festival – designed to give cinephiles, activists and enthusiasts alike an opportunity to discuss the films of director Spike Lee with a panel of theologians, scholars, journalists and policymakers. Among the panelists is Greg Garrett, Ph.D., professor of English in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and author of more than 20 books on religion, politics, narrative, literature and popular culture.
Jan
28
2019
WACO, Texas (Jan. 28, 2019) — Facebook political memes of Donald Trump in the 2016 election were more likely to focus on his hairstyle and facial expressions, while those of Hillary Clinton were more likely to center on the email scandal and her relationships — a contrast to historical gender stereotypes in politics, a Baylor University study has found.
Jan
28
2019
Jan. 28, 2019
In its weekly Going Out Guide staff, The Washington Post includes the Feb. 1-2 conference co-sponsored by Baylor, “A Long, Long Way: Race and Film,” at Washington National Cathedral. One of D.C.’s most solemn spaces will host screenings of two of Spike Lee’s defining works, “Do The Right Thing” and “BlacKkKlansman,”complemented by discussions about the struggles facing the black community. Among the panelists is Greg Garrett, Ph.D., professor of English in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and author of more than 20 books on religion, politics, narrative, literature and popular culture.
Jan
28
2019
WACO, Texas (Jan. 28, 2019) – For the second year, Baylor University will co-sponsor a special conference in Washington, D.C., during Black History Month that brings together educators, filmmakers, theologians and policymakers to explore ways that film and culture can spark important discussions about race and justice.
Jan
28
2019
WACO, Texas (Jan. 28, 2019) – For the second year, Baylor University will co-sponsor a special conference in Washington, D.C., during Black History Month that brings together educators, filmmakers, theologians and policymakers to explore ways that film and culture can spark important discussions about race and justice.
Jan
24
2019
Jan. 22, 2019
The next U.S. presidential election is nearly two years away, but a number of people have been declaring their intentions to run. On the heels of the contentious 2018 midterms, it seems the U.S. is in constant campaign mode – and some people are getting weary. “Election fatigue is real in the United States,” said Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in Baylor University’s College of Arts & Sciences. Flavin, who studies the impact of politics and policies on citizens’ quality of life, said it’s important for citizens to know what’s happening on the national political scene, but he advises people to take a break when it becomes overwhelming.
Jan
22
2019
Jan. 22, 2019
Darren Frame, clinical assistant professor of management in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, is among the national negotiation experts interviewed for this article about President Trump’s negotiation style. Frame, a businessman who now teaches negotiation at Baylor, said, “Trump is really good at being the bad guy for a while. He’s pretty ego-driven, of course, which gives him a huge advantage in that he doesn’t worry so much about what people think of him, unless he thinks he’s wrongly accused of things. That’s when you see him fight back.” (Eric Eckert, assistant director of Media and Public Relations, arranged this interview.)
Jan
22
2019
Jan. 18, 2019
Jeremy Everett, M.Div. ’01, founder and executive director of the Texas Hunger Initiative at Baylor, is quoted in this article about how the federal government’s partial shutdown is spreading in sometimes unexpected ways to millions of people who don’t work for the federal government, such as the roughly 40 million people who depend on federal food assistance. THI provides research and resources to organizations addressing food insecurity.
Jan
22
2019
Jan. 18, 2019
Jeremy Everett, M.Div. ’01, founder and executive director of the Texas Hunger Initiative at Baylor, is quoted in this article about how the federal government’s partial shutdown is spreading in sometimes unexpected ways to millions of people who don’t work for the federal government, such as the roughly 40 million people who depend on federal food assistance. THI provides research and resources to organizations addressing food insecurity.
Jan
14
2019
Jan. 14, 2019
The number of parks, libraries and natural resources in the state where you reside might have a great deal to do with how happy you are, according to a study by Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. “Public goods are things you can't exclude people from using — and one person using them doesn't stop another from doing so,” which may account for the fact that government spending on them is less politically controversial. “They're typically not profitable to produce in the private market, so if the government doesn't provide them, they will either be under-provided or not at all.”
Jan
11
2019
Jan. 10, 2019
In this article, Philip Jenkins, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of History in Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion, writes that Europeans generally do a poor job of understanding how the U.S. Constitutional system works — but “virtually every error and distortion concerning such matters that we read in (say) the British press can easily be paralleled in U.S. outlets, and some of the worst offenders are Americans.” Many reports — among them some about impeachment — do not make clear extensive checks and balances specified in the Constitution.
Jan
10
2019
Jan. 8, 2019
AUDIO: Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, roads and police protection, according to a study by Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The new study in the journal Social Science Research found that public goods spending allows people folks to feel more connected while boosting home values and civic pride. Flavin also noted that “public goods tend to be less controversial… I think there is less political conflict over public goods spending simply because if the government doesn’t provide them, they won’t be provided at all.”
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