Historic Waco Foundation

Historic Waco Foundation

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO:

  • Remember to practice social distancing! The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Be sure to maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from anyone outside of your household.
  • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth with unwashed hands.
  • For more information on CDC recommendations, visit cdc.gov/coronavirus

Plan ahead: A full overview of the Historic Waco homes and where they can be found is available at www.historicwaco.org. The Historic Waco Homes are located throughout the downtown Waco area all within a short drive of each other. Coloring sheets are available for each historic home on the tour. Print them in advance, and bring them along to complete! Free parking is available at each home. 

  1. Order coffee and breakfast to go. We recommend Dichotomy Coffee. Call ahead - (254) 717-3226 -  to order a custom hot or cold drinks to kickstart your day (or order online!). Head across Austin Avenue to the county courthouse parking lot for one of downtown Waco’s best-known food trucks, Sergio's, and order a breakfast burrito to nourish your body and taste buds before hopping in your car to tour Historic Waco Foundation's homes

  2. The first of three Historic Waco Foundation homes is the McCulloch House, located just a couple of blocks away at 407 Columbus Ave. Originally built in 1866 as a two bedroom house with detached kitchen, prominent Wacoans Mr. and Mrs. Champe Carter McCulloch expanded the house, adding the Greek Revival addition it's known for today. Champe McCulloch, former Waco Mayor and his wife, Emma, positioned the house as a hub for the local social scene for many years.

    McCulloch House Coloring Page Want a closer look? Historic Waco Foundation offers a virtual tour of the home that you can view while safely socially distancing in your car as you finish your breakfast. 
     

  3. Next head back towards IH-35 to visit the Earle Napier Kinnard House located at 814 S 4th Street. Built in 1858, this Greek Revival residence was one of Waco’s first brick homes, constructed when Waco Village was home to hundreds -- not the hundred thousands the city is home to today! The property changed hands through generations, and briefly rented rooms to Baylor students.
     
  4. The final stop on the tour is Historic Waco Foundation's East Terrace House, located at 100 Mill Street. Constructed in 1872 by businessman John Wesley Mann, this example of Italianate architecture sits along the banks of the Brazos River. Throughout the years, the "Entertainment Wing" was host to lavish parties and events in the ballroom. Virtually, explore the interior of the home through these highlights on YouTube. There is no sweeter combination than history and ice cream. Place your pick-up order from Go Gold! Partner Sub Zero Nitrogen Ice Cream for a new age twist on an old school classic. 
     
  5. As you head back to your own home, share your favorite aspects of each Historic Waco Foundation house. Was it the style, or perhaps the history of each home? Which architectural style was your favorite? Discuss other homes in Waco that remind you of a time that once was. Don't forget to complete the coloring sheets (we recommend a nice green and gold color scheme!) or learn about some of the residents of these homes by playing Historic Waco Bingo as you shelter in place. 

To take learning to the next level, become a member of the Historic Waco Foundation, and enjoy annual events, exhibitions and activities and more. You can also purchase Historic Homes of Waco, Texas, available through the Historic Waco Foundation's online bookstore. The book, written by Kenneth Hafertepe, chair of the department of museum studies at Baylor University, details the history of 120 local historic houses. 

The Historic Waco Foundation homes are just three of the many places within our city representative of a long and storied history. Visit wacohistory.org to learn more about these sites or other aspects of Waco's history.