Movie Mondays at the Hippodrome

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INFORMATION

Established in 2015, Movie Mondays is a collaborative partnership between the Department of Student Activities, the Waco Hippodrome and various campus partners.

Throughout the semester, Baylor students and the Waco community are provided an opportunity to view documentary or independent films that address important topics and issues within our world.

Admission is FREE, but tickets for entrance are REQUIRED (unless noted otherwise in the detailed schedule listed below) and can be picked up at the Waco Hippodrome Box Office or Baylor Ticket Office.

CAMPUS PARTNERS

Are you interested in partnering with us to screen a film? Please use the following link to access further information and fill out our Movie Mondays Partnership Application: https://baylor.campuslabs.com/engage/submitter/form/start/273260

For further questions regarding the program or to make a film recommendation, contact us at:

Jordy Dickey, jordy_dickey@baylor.edu, 254-710-6291
Sarah Patterson, sarah_patterson1@baylor.edu, 254-710-3233

FALL 2019 SCHEDULE

SEP. 16 @ 7PM || RAISE HELL: THE LIFE & TIMES OF MOLLY IVINS
PRESENTED BY MCDP
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

RAISE HELL is about a Texas maverick named Molly Ivins. She was one of the most courageous journalists of modern times… and also one of the funniest. Often compared to Mark Twain and Will Rogers, this six-foot tall Texan used her razor-sharp wit to speak truth to power while giving a voice to those who didn’t have one. Calling out corrupt politicians who were backed by corporate bosses was great sport for Molly, and many of her targets loved being in her columns. Molly was a trailblazer for female journalists. At the height of her popularity, nearly 400 papers carried her column. She appeared on national television and radio, lectured all over the country and encouraged her constituents to raise hell and fight for freedom. Molly was a tall drink of water that quenched a thirsty populace who, isolated by geography and politics, knew they were not alone when they heard her voice. A fighter against injustice until the very end, breast cancer took Ivins out of the game way too soon. Who today can fill Molly’s size-12 shoes? Where are the journalistic mavericks doing what Molly did? Molly Ivins' voice and humor are needed now more than ever.

SEP. 23 @ 7PM || THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM chronicles the eight-year quest of John and Molly Chester as they trade city living for 200 acres of barren farmland and a dream to harvest in harmony with nature. Through dogged perseverance and embracing the opportunity provided by nature's conflicts, the Chester’s unlock and uncover a biodiverse design for living that exists far beyond their farm, its seasons, and our wildest imagination. Featuring breathtaking cinematography, captivating animals, and an urgent message to heed Mother Nature’s call, THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM provides us all a vital blueprint for better living and a healthier planet.

SEP. 30 @ 7PM || AMAZING GRACE
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

In January 1972, Aretha Franklin gave two days of gospel performances at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Watts, Los Angeles, recording what would become her bestselling album, Amazing Grace. The sessions were captured by a film crew led by Sydney Pollack, but the footage wound up shelved in a vault and has remained one of the lost cinematic treasures of twentieth-century music. Before Pollack’s death in 2008, he expressed a wish for the film to be completed, and producer Alan Elliott took it up with a team of supporters as a passion project. Amazing Grace lets the events unfold on film without imposing present-day interviews. It fits in the tradition of other concert documentaries of the era, such as Monterey Pop and Woodstock, yet it stands out for its focus on African-American music (preceding Wattstax, filmed later that year). As the daughter of Detroit’s prominent Reverend C.L. Franklin, Aretha was deeply immersed in gospel and grew up among the leaders of the genre. Her father and other gospel mentors can be spotted in the crowd – as can Mick Jagger and Charlie Watts, lingering in the back of the church. In his book on Amazing Grace, author Aaron Cohen calls the album “a milestone because of Franklin’s call-and-response with her collaborators.” Leading the musicians is Reverend James Cleveland, backed by the legendary Atlantic Records rhythm section and the Southern California Community Choir. Watching their interactions is revelatory for both gospel aficionados and outsiders. To paraphrase the title song: what once was lost, now is found.

OCT. 21 @ 7PM || END GAME WITH FILMMAKER Q&A DISCUSSION
PRESENTED BY PROVIDENCE HOSPICE
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

END GAME weaves together three stories of visionary medical providers who practice on the cutting edge of life and death, helping to change the way we think about both: the palliative care team at UCSF Medical Center, the most sophisticated acute care hospital in Northern California; Zen Hospice Project, a Buddhist-inspired end-of-life residence in a classic San Francisco Victorian; and B.J. Miller, M.D., a physician who understands suffering first-hand (he lost three limbs in an accident when he was 19) and who has worked with both UCSF and Zen Hospice. For most people, the very words “hospice” and “palliative care” are nonstarters—code words for giving up. This core group of caregivers in San Francisco sees it differently. They are dedicated to relieving suffering, and to changing the way we think about—and make choices about—how we live our lives as we near life’s end. Their commitment is vividly embodied in their interactions with their terminally ill patients. These intimate and often highly charged emotional moments—with caregivers, patients, and patients’ families and loved ones—are at the heart of End Game.

OCT. 28 @ 7PM || THE REAL CHERNOBYL
PRESENTED BY BAYLOR DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY & PHI ALPHA THETA
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

On the heels of the wildly successful Sky Atlantic/HBO dramatic series Chernobyl comes the powerful companion documentary The Real Chernobyl. The film introduces us to the real-life figures portrayed in the narrative series, and offers their haunting first-person accounts. On April 26, 1986, an explosion rocked reactor #4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine. Mass amounts of damaging radioactive materials ballooned and swept across the region, leading to mass evacuations, a string of agonizing deaths, and incalculable health-related issues for well over 100,000 citizens. The event stands as the worst nuclear accident in history, and Mikhail Gorbachev credits the catastrophe for the eventual collapse of the Soviet Union. One of the film's main interview subjects is Sergei Parashin, the Deputy Director of the plant at the time of the explosion. In a sorrowful, matter-of-fact manner, he testifies to the sense of helplessness and chaos that characterized the days and weeks following this event. In his view, the defects and design flaws were known among physicists associated with the plant, but the personnel on duty that night were too ill informed to properly manage the situation. Other witnesses from safety directors to truck drivers to ambulatory transport also weigh in with their recollections. They speak to the resolve of first responders as they braved threats both immediate and invisible. We're presented with the recollections of helicopter pilots who attempted to secure themselves as they flew into the eye of the radioactive clouds. We hear the survivors from that terrible day, and those who have lost loved ones from related illnesses in the decades since. The cameras roam through the area as it exists today, including an eerily deserted and disintegrated children's play area. Through these interviews and wealth of archived footage, we are taken through each step of the crisis step by agonizing step. Interspersed throughout the documentary are clips from the hit series, which provides a sense of context for those who are otherwise unfamiliar with this dark period of history. The Real Chernobyl is a thorough and deeply personal account of one of history's most horrific disasters.

NOV. 4 @ 7PM || ZERO WEEKS
PRESENTED BY BAYLOR SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK & GSSW
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

Most Americans agree that family comes first. No matter where you work or what zip code you live in, you should be able to welcome a new child, to care for your mother when she has her knee replaced or to heal from cancer without facing financial disaster. And yet in 2016, only 14 percent of private sector workers in the U.S. reported having paid family leave through an employer; less than 40 percent have personal medical leave through an employer-provided temporary disability program. The United States and Papua New Guinea are the only countries in the world without a paid leave law. Because 44 percent of American households don’t have enough savings to cover their basic expenses for three months, families are often forced to choose between taking time off to care for a partner or parent with an unexpected medical emergency or continuing to work so that they can keep their job and health insurance. The crisis is just as bleak for new mothers. Nearly 1 in 4 mothers return to work within two weeks of having a baby. Without the protections of paid leave, new mothers are 40% more likely to need food stamps or public assistance. Weaving powerful stories together with insightful interviews with leading policymakers, economists, researchers, and activists, ZERO WEEKS lays out a compelling argument for guaranteed paid leave for every American worker. The film looks at paid leave from an emotional, medical, financial and global perspective.

NOV. 11 @ 7PM || TONI MORRISON: THE PIECES I AM WITH Q&A DISCUSSION
PRESENTED BY BAYLOR DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

An artful and intimate meditation on the life and works of the legendary storyteller and Nobel prize-winner. From her childhood in the steel town of Lorain, Ohio, to ʼ70s-era book tours with Muhammad Ali, from the front lines with Angela Davis to her own riverfront writing room — Toni Morrison leads an assembly of her peers, critics and colleagues on an exploration of race, America, history and the human condition as seen through the prism of her own literature. Inspired to write because no one took a “little black girl” seriously, Morrison reflects on her lifelong deconstruction of the master narrative. Woven together with a rich collection of art, history, literature and personality, the film includes discussions about her many critically acclaimed works, including novels “The Bluest Eye,” “Sula” and “Song of Solomon,” her role as an editor of iconic African-American literature and her time teaching at Princeton University. Featuring interviews with Hilton Als, Angela Davis, Fran Lebowitz, Walter Mosley, Sonia Sanchez and Oprah Winfrey, who turned Morrison’s novel “Beloved” into a feature film.

DEC. 2 @ 7PM || THE RIVER AND THE WALL
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

The River and the Wall follows five friends on an immersive adventure through the unknown wilds of the Texas borderlands as they travel 1200 miles from El Paso to the Gulf of Mexico on horses, mountain bikes, and canoes. Conservation filmmaker Ben Masters realizes the urgency of documenting the last remaining wilderness in Texas as the threat of new border wall construction looms ahead. Masters recruits NatGeo Explorer Filipe DeAndrade, ornithologist Heather Mackey, river guide Austin Alvarado, and conservationist Jay Kleberg to join him on the two-and-a-half-month journey down 1,200 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border. They set out to document the borderlands and explore the potential impacts of a wall on the natural environment, but as the wilderness gives way to the more populated and heavily trafficked Lower Rio Grande Valley, they come face-to-face with the human side of the immigration debate and enter uncharted emotional waters.