Movie Mondays at the Hippodrome

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INFORMATION

Established in 2015, Movie Mondays is a collaborative partnership between the Department of Student Activities, the Waco Hippodrome and various campus partners.

Throughout the semester, Baylor students and the Waco community are provided an opportunity to view documentary or independent films that address important topics and issues within our world.

Admission is FREE, but tickets for entrance are REQUIRED (unless noted otherwise in the detailed schedule listed below) and can be picked up at the Waco Hippodrome Box Office or Baylor Ticket Office.

CAMPUS PARTNERS

Are you interested in partnering with us to screen a film? Please use the following link to access further information and fill out our Movie Mondays Partnership Application: https://orgsync.com/96545/forms/325121.

For further questions regarding the program or to make a film recommendation, contact us at:

Jordy Dickey, jordy_dickey@baylor.edu, 254-710-6291

FALL 2019 SCHEDULE

SEP. 16 @ 7PM || THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM chronicles the eight-year quest of John and Molly Chester as they trade city living for 200 acres of barren farmland and a dream to harvest in harmony with nature. Through dogged perseverance and embracing the opportunity provided by nature's conflicts, the Chester’s unlock and uncover a biodiverse design for living that exists far beyond their farm, its seasons, and our wildest imagination. Featuring breathtaking cinematography, captivating animals, and an urgent message to heed Mother Nature’s call, THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM provides us all a vital blueprint for better living and a healthier planet.

SEP. 23 @ 7PM || AMAZING GRACE
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

In January 1972, Aretha Franklin gave two days of gospel performances at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Watts, Los Angeles, recording what would become her bestselling album, Amazing Grace. The sessions were captured by a film crew led by Sydney Pollack, but the footage wound up shelved in a vault and has remained one of the lost cinematic treasures of twentieth-century music. Before Pollack’s death in 2008, he expressed a wish for the film to be completed, and producer Alan Elliott took it up with a team of supporters as a passion project. Amazing Grace lets the events unfold on film without imposing present-day interviews. It fits in the tradition of other concert documentaries of the era, such as Monterey Pop and Woodstock, yet it stands out for its focus on African-American music (preceding Wattstax, filmed later that year). As the daughter of Detroit’s prominent Reverend C.L. Franklin, Aretha was deeply immersed in gospel and grew up among the leaders of the genre. Her father and other gospel mentors can be spotted in the crowd – as can Mick Jagger and Charlie Watts, lingering in the back of the church. In his book on Amazing Grace, author Aaron Cohen calls the album “a milestone because of Franklin’s call-and-response with her collaborators.” Leading the musicians is Reverend James Cleveland, backed by the legendary Atlantic Records rhythm section and the Southern California Community Choir. Watching their interactions is revelatory for both gospel aficionados and outsiders. To paraphrase the title song: what once was lost, now is found.

SEP. 30 @ 7PM || THE RIVER AND THE WALL
PRESENTED BY UNION BOARD
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

The River and the Wall follows five friends on an immersive adventure through the unknown wilds of the Texas borderlands as they travel 1200 miles from El Paso to the Gulf of Mexico on horses, mountain bikes, and canoes. Conservation filmmaker Ben Masters realizes the urgency of documenting the last remaining wilderness in Texas as the threat of new border wall construction looms ahead. Masters recruits NatGeo Explorer Filipe DeAndrade, ornithologist Heather Mackey, river guide Austin Alvarado, and conservationist Jay Kleberg to join him on the two-and-a-half-month journey down 1,200 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border. They set out to document the borderlands and explore the potential impacts of a wall on the natural environment, but as the wilderness gives way to the more populated and heavily trafficked Lower Rio Grande Valley, they come face-to-face with the human side of the immigration debate and enter uncharted emotional waters.

OCT. 21 @ 7PM || END GAME WITH FILMMAKER Q&A DISCUSSION
PRESENTED BY PROVIDENCE HOSPICE
LOCATION: WACO HIPPODROME

End Game weaves together three stories of visionary medical providers who practice on the cutting edge of life and death, helping to change the way we think about both: the palliative care team at UCSF Medical Center, the most sophisticated acute care hospital in Northern California; Zen Hospice Project, a Buddhist-inspired end-of-life residence in a classic San Francisco Victorian; and B.J. Miller, M.D., a physician who understands suffering first-hand (he lost three limbs in an accident when he was 19) and who has worked with both UCSF and Zen Hospice. For most people, the very words “hospice” and “palliative care” are nonstarters—code words for giving up. This core group of caregivers in San Francisco sees it differently. They are dedicated to relieving suffering, and to changing the way we think about—and make choices about—how we live our lives as we near life’s end. Their commitment is vividly embodied in their interactions with their terminally ill patients. These intimate and often highly charged emotional moments—with caregivers, patients, and patients’ families and loved ones—are at the heart of End Game.