White Eye Detector:
How Baylor Research Fights Pediatric Eye Disease

White Eye Detector:
How Baylor Research Fights Pediatric Eye Disease

Baylor Associate Professor, Brian Shaw

When Bryan Shaw’s son, Noah, was diagnosed with retinoblastoma at four months of age, it began a family’s long journey towards healing—and a Baylor professor’s quest to help families like his own.

Learn how Bryan Shaw, associate professor of chemistry, and Greg Hamerly, associate professor of computer science, collaborated to build the White Eye Detector app, a Science Advances gold-standard tool enabling parents to screen for pediatric eye disease.

Download CRADLE White Eye Detector on the iOS App Store Download CRADLE White Eye Detector on Google Play

Learn More about Bryan Shaw and Greg Hamerly
Feb
12
2020
The White Eye App, developed by Baylor professors Bryan Shaw and Greg Hamerly, is a Science Advances gold standard tool which enables parents to screen photos of their children for pediatric eye disease. CBS This Morning reports on the app, and shares how one family used the app for early detection of Coates Disease to avoid further eye damage for their six-year old son.
Dec
9
2019
When Bryan Shaw’s son, Noah, was diagnosed with pediatric eye cancer at four months old, it sparked in Shaw a mission to help other families avoid the challenges his faced. On this Baylor Connections, Dr. Bryan Shaw, associate professor of chemistry, and Dr. Greg Hamerly, associate professor of computer science, share the moving story behind the White Eye Detector app.
Oct
3
2019
WACO, Texas (Oct. 3, 2019) — A Baylor University researcher’s prototype smartphone app — designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer — has passed its first big test.
Oct
2
2019
Here, a free smartphone application (CRADLE: ComputeR-Assisted Detector of LEukocoria) was engineered to detect photographic leukocoria and is available for download under the name “White Eye Detector.”
Oct
3
2018
WACO, Texas (Oct. 3, 2018) – The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports researchers at every level of experience, but the agency also places a high priority on cultivating the work of promising scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians through Early Career Development Grants, known collectively as CAREER grants. Five Baylor University faculty members have received these grants that dramatically develop their research paths early in their academic careers.
Sep
15
2016
Baylor professors and their students throughout the College of Arts and Science are engaged in high-level research focused on the fight against cancer. Each professor brings his or her own unique insight to the fight, but all seek to better understand how the disease behaves and grows in different ways, which could lead to breakthroughs in how the disease is treated.
Mar
16
2016
Learn how an app created by two Baylor professors has been used around the world to detect eye cancer and save the lives of young children.
Jan
5
2014
Baylor professor turns son's diagnosis into motivation to explore new ways to identify retinoblastoma
Dec
3
2013
Baylor University (Texas) and Harvard Medical School (Mass.) researchers are helping make pediatric eye cancer easier to detect. Bryan F. Shaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Baylor, discovered, through the use of amateur digital photography, evidence of leukocoria or "white eye," the cardinal symptom of retinoblastoma, can be seen in photographs during the earliest stages of the disease.