Melanie J. Sekeres, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
High Res Photo
CV

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Education

Ph.D., Physiology, University of Toronto, 2012

B.Sc., Psychology, Trent University, 2002

Biography

Dr. Sekeres earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology at the University of Toronto in 2012. She conducted her graduate research at the Hospital for Sick Children’s Program in Neurosciences & Mental Health, where she investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation processes in the mouse brain. Dr. Sekeres then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. There she turned her focus towards using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy young adults to investigate how the passage of time affects the quality and neural representation of episodic memory in humans. Dr. Sekeres joined the Baylor faculty in 2016.

Research

My research uses a combination of human and animal memory models to understand how memories are formed and stored in the brain (memory consolidation). I study the molecular mechanisms and plasticity underlying memory formation in the rodent brain, and use functional neuroimaging of healthy adults to investigate how networks of brain activity change as memories age and transform over time. My lab also studies factors that promote memory retention and healthy aging in the rodent brain. While these areas of research aim to understand memory processing in the healthy brain, they have applications for understanding memory dysfunction associated with normal aging, as well as traumatic brain injury, and neurodegeneration.

Representative Publications:

Sekeres, M., Bonasia, K., St-Laurent, M., Pishdadian, S., Winocur, G., Grady, C., Moscovitch, M. (2016). Recovering and preventing loss of detailed memory: Differential rates of forgetting for detail types in episodic memory. Learning & Memory, 23: 72-82.

Gilboa, A., Sekeres, M., Moscovitch, M., Winocur, G. (2014) Higher order conditioning is impaired by hippocampal lesions. Current Biology, 24(18): 2202-2207.

Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M., Sekeres, M. (2013) Factors affecting graded and ungraded memory loss following hippocampal lesions. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 106: 351-364.

Winocur, G., Sekeres, M., Binns, M. Moscovitch, M. (2013) Hippocampal lesions produce both non-graded and temporally-graded retrograde amnesia in the same rats. Hippocampus, 23: 330-341.

Sekeres, M., Sargin, D., Mercaldo, V., Frankland, P.W., Josselyn, S.A. (2012). Increasing CRTC1 function in the dentate gyrus during memory formation or reactivation increases memory strength without compromising memory quality. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(49):17857-68.

Cole, C.J., Mercaldo, V., Restivo, L., Yiu, A.P., Sekeres, M.J., Han, J.H., Vetere G., Pekar, T., Ross, P.J., Neve, R.L., Frankland, P.W., Josselyn, S.A. (2012). MEF2 negatively regulates learning-induced structural plasticity and memory formation. Nature Neuroscience 15:1255-64.

Sekeres, M., Sargin, D., Mercaldo, V., Frankland, P.W., Josselyn, S.A. (2012). Increasing CRTC1 function in the dentate gyrus during memory formation or reactivation increases memory strength without compromising memory quality. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(49):17857-68.

Sekeres, M.J., Neve, R., Frankland, P.W., Josselyn, S.A. (2010). Dorsal hippocampal CREB is both necessary and sufficient for spatial memory. Learning & Memory, 17(6): 280-3.

Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M., Rosenbaum, R.S., Sekeres, M. (2010). Investigation of the effects of hippocampal lesions in rats on pre- and post-operatively acquired spatial memory in a complex environment. Hippocampus, 20 (12): 1350-65.

Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M., Rosenbaum, R.S., Sekeres, M. (2010). A study of remote spatial memory in aged rats. Neurobiology of Aging (1):143-50.

Winocur, G., Frankland, P.W., Sekeres, M., Fogel, S., Moscovitch, M. (2009). Changes in context-specificity during memory reconsolidation: Selective effects of hippocampal lesions. Learning & Memory 16(11):722-9.

Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M., Sekeres, M. (2007). Memory consolidation or transformation: Context manipulation and hippocampal representations of memory. Nature Neuroscience, 10, 555-557.

Winocur, G., Wojtowicz, J.M., Sekeres, M., Snyder, J.S., Wang, S. (2006). Inhibition of neurogenesis interferes with hippocampus-dependent memory function. Hippocampus, 16: 296-304.

Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M., Fogel, S., Rosenbaum, R.S., Sekeres, M. (2005). Preserved spatial memory after hippocampal lesions: effects of extensive experience in a complex environment. Nature Neuroscience, 8, 273-275.

Book Chapters:

Sekeres, M., Moscovitch, M., Winocur, G. (in press). Mechanisms of memory consolidation and transformation. In B. Rasch & N. Axmacher (Eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Consolidation. Springer Publishing.

Sekeres, M., Winocur, G., Moscovitch, M. (in press). Beyond Tulving et al., Priming of semantic autobiographical knowledge: A case study of retrograde amnesia. In B. Kolb & I. Wishaw (Eds.), Brain and Behaviour: Revisiting the Classic Studies. SAGE Publishing, UK.

Sekeres, M., Sargin, D., Ross, P.J., Josselyn, S.A. (2012). The role of CREB and CREB co-activators in memory formation. In K.P. Giese (Ed.), The Memory Mechanisms in Health and Disease: Mechanistic Basis of Memory. World Scientific Publishing.

Graduate Student Recruitment

Dr. Sekeres is currently accepting applications for Ph.D. students.

Current Ph.D. Students:

Greg Sullens

Courses taught at Baylor

  • PSY/NSC 3320 Learning & Behavior
  • PSY 5323 - Biological Foundations of Behavior