Jordan Cash

Jordan Cash
Lecturer
Office
Phone
High Res Photo
CV

Education:

Ph.D., Political Science, Baylor University2019

M.A., Political Science, Baylor University, 2016

B.A., History and Political Science, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2011

Bio

Jordan Cash studies American institutions, constitutional law, and political theory. He is currently working on a book examining how presidents who were isolated from other institutions used their constitutional authority to achieve their policy goals, providing a clearer view of the office’s constitutional logic and baseline of authority. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Polity, American Political Thought, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Law and History Review, and Laws. He has also published chapters in several edited volumes, as well as book reviews and encyclopedia entries. He received his B.A. in History and Political Science from the University of Nebraska-Omaha, his M.A. and Ph.D. from Baylor University. From 2018-2020 he was a fellow in the Program on Constitutionalism and Democracy at the University of Virginia.

 

Courses Taught
PSC 4320 African American Politics

PSC 3330 The American Presidency

PSC 2302 American Constitutional Development

PSC 1387 The U.S. Constitution, Its Interpretation, and the American Political Experience

 

Selected Publications

“‘The Voice of America’: Conflicts between the President and Speaker of the House on Setting the Foreign Policy Agenda.” Polity (Forthcoming).

“George Sutherland and the Contextualization of Executive Power.” American Political Thought 9, no. 1 (Winter 2020: 50-84.

“George Mason and the Ambiguity of Executive Power.” Presidential Studies Quarterly 48, no. 4 (December 2018): 741-767.

“Donald Trump and Institutional Change Strategies.” Laws 7, no. 3 (July 2018): 1-21 (with Dave Bridge).

“The Isolated Presidency: John Tyler and Unilateral Presidential Power.” American Political Thought 7, no. 1 (Winter 2018): 26-56.

“The Court and the Old Dominion: Judicial Review Among the Virginia Jeffersonians.” Law and History Review 35, no. 2 (May 2017): 351-390.