Baylor University
Department of Physics
College of Arts and Sciences

Baylor > Physics > News
Physics News




News Categories
•  Baylor
•  Colloquium
•  Faculty Meetings
•  Graduate
•  Outreach
•  Research Seminars
•  Social Events
•  SPS


Top News
•  'Holy Grail' Hadron: Scientists Are Close to Detecting the Elusive Tetraquark Particle
•  New Map of Dark Matter Puts the Big Bang Theory on Trial (Kavli Roundtable)
•  There and Back Again: Scientists Beam Photons to Space to Test Quantum Theory
•  New definitions of scientific units are on the horizon
•  IBM Has Used Its Quantum Computer to Simulate a Molecule—Here’s Why That’s Big News
•  Gravity may be created by strange flashes in the quantum realm A model of how wave forms of quantum systems collapse reveals a way they could create gravitational fields, and perhaps even reconcile two pillars of physics
•  Scientists discover strange form of black hole at the heart of Milky Way
•  3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths - and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry
•  Dark Energy Survey reveals most accurate measurement of universe's dark matter
•  World's Fastest-Swirling Vortex Simulates the Big Bang
•  UCI celestial census indicates that black holes pervade the universe
•  Cosmic map reveals a not-so-lumpy Universe
•  High-Precision Measurement of the Proton’s Atomic Mass
•  Strange Noise in Gravitational-Wave Data Sparks Debate
•  STARSHOT: INSIDE THE PLAN TO SEND A SPACECRAFT TO OUR NEIGHBOR STAR: Hundreds of engineers and scientists have come together to shoot for the stars, literally.
•  Two Students Just Broke a Quantum Computing World Record
•  An easy-to-build desktop muon detector
•  Groundbreaking discovery confirms existence of orbiting supermassive black holes
•  NASA's Kepler Space Telescope Finds Hundreds of New Exoplanets, Boosts Total to 4,034
•  China’s quantum satellite achieves ‘spooky action’ at record distance
•  Scientists make waves with black hole research
•  We Live in a Cosmic Void, Another Study Confirms
•  Scientists Finally Witnessed a Phenomenon That Einstein Thought “Impossible”
•  Charmed Existence: Mysterious Particles Could Reveal Mysteries of the Big Bang
•  A New State of Matter is Discovered – And It’s Strange
•  A Theory of Reality as More Than the Sum of Its Parts
•  Dark Energy May Lurk in the Nothingness of Space
•  What Happens When You Mix Thermodynamics and the Quantum World? A Revolution
•  Alien Civilizations May Number In The Trillions, New Study Says
•  New blackbody force depends on spacetime geometry and topology
•  Gravitational Waves Could Help Us Detect the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions
•  We could detect alien life by finding complex molecules
•  We May Have Uncovered the First Ever Evidence of the Multiverse
•  Scientists Just Discovered an Alien Planet That’s The Best Candidate for Life As We Know It
•  Physicists detect whiff of new particle at the Large Hadron Collider
•  Physicists Discover Hidden Aspects of Electrodynamics
•  A dark matter 'bridge' holding galaxies together has been captured for the first time
•  No, Dark Energy Isn't An Illusion
•  Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter
•  Magnetic hard drives go atomic
•  Could Mysterious Cosmic Light Flashes Be Powering Alien Spacecraft?
•  NASA is Going to Create The Coldest Spot in the Known Universe
•  Testing theories of modified gravity
•  First Solid Sign that Matter Doesn't Behave Like Antimatter
•  Physicists investigate erasing information at zero energy cost
•  NASA Just Found A Solar System With 7 Earth-Like Planets
•  Nearby Star Has 7 Earth-Sized Worlds - Most In Habitable Zone
•  Data About 2 Distant Asteroids: Clues to the Possible Planet Nine
•  Tune Your Radio: Galaxies Sing When Forming Stars
•  Coders Race to Save NASA's Climate Data
•  You Can Help Scientists Find the Next Earth-Like Planet
•  Scientists Discover Over 100 New Exoplanets
•  Why These Scientists Fear Contact With Space Aliens
•  Scientists May Have Solved the Biggest Mystery of the Big Bang
•  New Research Shows the Universe May Have Once Been a Hologram
•  Dark energy emerges when energy conservation is violated
•  Physicists measure the loss of dark matter since the birth of the universe
•  This star has a secret – even better than 'alien megastructures'
•  Testing theories of modified gravity
•  A simple explanation of mysterious space-stretching ‘dark energy?’
•  Physicists detect exotic looped trajectories of light in three-slit experiment
•  Actual footage shows what it was like to land on Saturn's moon Titan
•  Quaternions are introduced, October 16, 1843
•  The Sound Of Quantum Vacuum
•  Multiple copies of the Standard Model could solve the hierarchy problem
•  Universe May Have Lost 'Unstable' Dark Matter
•  Vera Rubin, Astronomer Who Did Pioneering Work on Dark Matter, Dies at 88
•  China's Hunt for Signals From the Dark Universe
•  Baylor Physics Ph.D. Graduate Quoted in "How Realistic Is the Interstellar Ship from 'Passengers'?"
•  Shutting a new door on locality
•  Unexpected interaction between dark matter and ordinary matter in mini-spiral galaxies
•  Thermodynamics constrains interpretations of quantum mechanics
•  Billions of Stars and Galaxies to Be Discovered in the Largest Cosmic Map Ever
•  Scientists Measure Antimatter for the First Time
•  Europe's Bold Plan for a Moon Base Is Coming Together
•  Einstein's Theory Just Put the Brakes on the Sun's Spin
•  Dying Star Offers Glimpse of Earth's Doomsday in 5B Years
•  Dark Matter Not So Clumpy After All
•  Scientists Catch "Virtual Particles" Hopping In and Out of Existence
•  New theory of gravity might explain dark matter
•  Supersolids produced in exotic state of quantum matter
•  You Can 3D Print Your Own Mini Universe
•  Creating Antimatter Via Lasers?
•  No, Astronomers Haven't Decided Dark Energy Is Nonexistent
•  Behind This Plant's Blue Leaves Lies a Weird Trick of Quantum Mechanics
•  Small entropy changes allow quantum measurements to be nearly reversed
•  Did the Mysterious 'Planet Nine' Tilt the Solar System?
•  Cosmological mystery solved by largest ever map of voids and superclusters
•  The Universe Has 10 Times More Galaxies Than Scientists Thought
•  Correlation between galaxy rotation and visible matter puzzles astronomers
•  The Spooky Secret Behind Artificial Intelligence's Incredible Power
•  Science of Disbelief: When Did Climate Change Become All About Politics?
•  Eyeballing Proxima b: Probably Not a Second Earth
•  Does the Drake Equation Confirm There Is Intelligent Alien Life in the Galaxy?
•  Scientists build world's smallest transistor
•  'Alien Megastructure' Star Keeps Getting Stranger
•  What's Out There? 'Star Men' Doc Tackles Life Questions Through Science
•  Evidence for new form of matter-antimatter asymmetry observed
•  Giant hidden Jupiters may explain lonely planet systems
•  Rarest nucleus reluctant to decay

Careers in Physics

March 4, 2010

College students change their major an average of three times in the four years in school, according to collegeboard.com. Deciding what career to do for the rest of your life that will support your eating-out habits and your obsession with ordering things off Amazon is enough to make you start hyperventilating.

Advisors are beginning to see a trend in the number of jobs that are open to particular majors. More people are beginning to change career paths numerous times in their lifetime. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has found a jump in the number of jobs the average person will hold in a lifetime.

The question is no longer, "What can I do with my major," but "What can't I do?"

Many Paths for Physicists

Physics majors have long been viewed as one-option-career-path physicists. However, that is no longer the case. A degree in physics covers a wide array of job offers, from specialized engineering to optometry. According to the bureau of labor statistics, physicists hold about 17,100 jobs in the US.

Because physics is the study of learning how things work, students in this field develop step-by-step problem solving abilities using skills in math, observation and communication. Physic majors develop a critical way of thinking that contributes to a variety of professions.

The job outlook for physicists is experiencing faster-than-average job growth. No longer are students waiting for professors or established physicists to retire so they may be able to take their place. Similarly, opportunities in the industry are just as numerous as those in universities and university research.

"It is time for the academic physics community to redefine what a physicist is and to embrace industrial physicists (bachelors, masters, and PhD's) as their colleagues. It is also time for the industry to take the mask off these hidden physicists and identify them by their proper title. The physics profession and industry would be well served if both these things happened," says Dr. Jay Dittman, associate professor of Physics.

Physics in Business, Medicine and Science

A Bachelor of Science in physics provides a solid base for students hoping to earn an advanced degree in areas beyond science or medicine, such as business, law or accounting.

Business is a good path for physics major because of the rigorous math courses students have undertaken. They would become an asset as economists by developing models, predictions and research regarding future economic conditions. Many physicists that go into business find themselves becoming executives or owners of companies.

Physicists develop a way of thinking that various fields need in order to create technological advances or to conduct research.

In a world where ipads and touch screen machines are becoming common fixtures in our lives, there is a need for people in the legal profession that are able to not only create patents and contracts, but who can also understand the scientific complexities behind such contracts.

If a physic major decides to go into the medical field there are other job possibilities besides becoming a doctor. Hospitals or manufacturers of diagnostic tools look for employees that can create machines that are in need in the health care system, such as MRIs or CAT scans.

Technology plays an important role for physicists for research and product development. Companies look for people that are able to test new devices involving superconductivity, optics, or lasers. Those areas are familiar territory for physics majors.

Much More Than a Major

Overall, the outlook for physics majors is bright. A variety of career opportunities offer a good match between a student's interest in physics and a job in any number of industries. Rapid advances in technology and the many applications of physics open up options for students that may not have previously existed.