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Colloquia

2019-2020 Mathematics Colloquium Schedule

September 26

3:30 PM - SDRICH 207

Changfeng Gui (University of Texas, San Antonio)
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD

October 15

3:30 PM - Room TBD

John Ewing (Math for America)
Title: Is there an education crisis?
Abstract: American education seems to be in permanent crisis. News reports tell us that schools and teachers are failing; international comparisons show American students are near the bottom; major corporations complain they cannot find qualified workers. Politicians and policymakers urge us to take immediate and radical action to address the crisis. Are things really do dire? The evidence for an education crisis is surprisingly ambiguous. What drives this apocalyptic view of education? What are the consequences of manufacturing a crisis where there isn’t one? And how can we solve education’s real problems with less melodrama and more common sense?

October 17

4:30 PM - Room TBD (Baylor Lecture Series in Math; Colloquium)

Luis Caffarelli (University of Texas, Austin)
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD

October 18

4:00 PM - BSB D110 (Baylor Lecture Series in Math; Public Lecture)

Luis Caffarelli (University of Texas, Austin)
Title: Diffusion-type Equations: From the Heat Equation to Long Distance Interactions
Abstract: The heat equation (an equation that describes how heat propagates along a solid, for instance alog a metal rod) was proposed by Fourier in 1807. It describes how temperature evolves in time given the influx of heat from its infinitesimal surrounding. It was soon realized that the pointwise evolution of other modeled systems (speed of a fluid, density of deformation of an elastic body, price of goods, populations) adjusts and reverst to its surroundings revealing a universality property that made it fundamental to science. On the other hand, in many cases, diffusion processes involve long range interactions including population dynamics, pricing, and atmospheric events. We will give an overview of the mathematics involved.

November 14

3:30 PM - SDRICH 207

David Damanik (Rice University)
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD

December 5

4:00 PM - BSB D110 (Undergraduate Lecture Series; Public Lecture)

David Arnold (University of Minnesota)
Title: Computational Mathematics Simulating the World
Abstract: In the late 20th century, science underwent a revolution as computational science emerged as the third mode of scientific exploration alongside experiment and theory. Computer simultation of physical reality has played an equally transformative role in virtually all areas of technology, affecting many aspects of modern life. We now depend on simulation to design, predict, and optimize natural and engineered systems of all sorts, ranging from mechanical to chemical to electronic, and at scales ranging from atomic to terrestrial to cosmological. Mathemtical algorithms have been crucial to these advances, even more so than advances in computer technology. In this talk we will encounter some of the mathematical ideas that have emerged and the ongoing challenges facing computational mathematics in simulating the world.

December 6

4:00 PM - MMSci 301 (Undergraduate Lecture Series; Colloquium)

David Arnold (University of Minnesota)
Title: Finite Element Exterior Calculus
Abstract: Finite element exterior calculus, or FEEC, is a prime example of a strucutre-preserving discretization method in which key mathematical structures of the continuous problem are exactly captured at the discrete level. In the case of FEEC these structures arise from differential complexes and their cohomology, and FEEC applies geometry, topology, and analysis in order to design and analyze stable and accurate numerical methods for the differential equations related to the complexes. We will present an accessible overview of FEEC and some of its applications.

April 30

3:30 PM - SDRICH 207

Svetlana Jitomirskaya (UC Irvine)
Title: TBD
Abstract: TBD

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