Fun with Shapes

Supplies
Supplies
Cut out your shapes. Styrofoam circle.
Cut out your shapes. Styrofoam circle.
Use a ruler to cut straight lines for rectangles and triangles.
Use a ruler to cut straight lines for rectangles and triangles.
Cut out your shapes. Potato triangle.
Cut out your shapes. Potato triangle.
By peeling the surface off a piece of cardboard, you can create a new texture for your stamp.
By peeling the surface off a piece of cardboard, you can create a new texture for your stamp.
Create your composition. This one was done without overlapping any shapes.
Create your composition. This one was done without overlapping any shapes.
Create your composition. This one was done by letting the first layer dry before overlapping.
Create your composition. This one was done by letting the first layer dry before overlapping.
Create your composition. This one was done by overlapping shapes while the ink was still wet.
Create your composition. This one was done by overlapping shapes while the ink was still wet.

Learn to make geometric stamps from materials around the home. Then create a print with your stamps. Discover what happens when you layer on top of dried ink/paint and compare with what happens when you layer on top of another wet layer.

Supplies

  • Potatoes, cardboard, styrofoam or sponges - choose one or more for creating stamps to use in the print project
  • Knife (for parents/older students), scissors, kid friendly pumpkin carving tools
  • Cutting board
  • Pen or pencil
  • Ruler
  • Several sheets of paper or card stock
  • “Ink”—this can be paint (tempera, acrylic, or watercolor), washable markers, etc.
    **You may also need a paint brush and small container of water if you choose to use watercolors.
  • Dipping tray or plate
  • Paper towels or baby wipes for cleaning up

 

Preparing Your Materials

  1. Gather items from supply list.
  2. If using potatoes, cut them in half.
  3. Circle - trace a round object with the pen on chosen stamp material and cut it out
  4. Square, rectangle and triangle can be cut out using the ruler to set your lines. ** For smaller children, an adult may need to make the basic cuts into the stamp material to get started.  Then allow children to o assist by cutting the rest of the shape out with the pumpkin carving tools or scissors.

 

Time to Create

Once you have all of your supplies together and your shapes made, it’s time for the fun to begin. Picking one color for each shape is the easiest way to go. It is possible to change shape colors. If you do, remember to start with a light color and use it until you don’t want that color anymore. Then wipe off the chosen shape really well before using it again with a darker color.

 

Tips

If using a paint tray, it may be helpful to press the first layer of paint on a spare sheet of paper or extra paper plate to get rid of any excess paint.

If you don’t want colors to bleed together on you shapes, either don’t let the shapes touch or allow a color time to dry before you add a new overlapping color. 

Also, If you want to do this again another day, clean up your stamps and put them in a baggie.

 

Experiment

If you don’t plan to use your stamps again, try overlapping the wet colors to see what happens. It will change the ink on your stamp and in the dip trays.

 

Share Your Work

Send a copy of your work to your teacher and/or art teacher. Explain what you learned. We love to see your creativity. Take a picture and tag us on social media or email it to MartinMuseum@baylor.edu

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Instagram: @martin_museum

Twitter: @MartinMuseumBU