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Schedule and Speaker Bios

Schedule and Speaker Bios

Schedule is Tentative and Subject to Change

Thursday, March 26, 2020


11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Tours of Baylor Law

12:00-12:45 p.m.
Lunch

12:45-1:00 p.m.
Welcoming Remarks

Leah W. Teague
Associate Dean and Professor of Law, Baylor Law
Stephen Rispoli
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Pro Bono Programs, Baylor Law


1:00-2:15 p.m.
Opening Plenary - Law School Deans Panel: Fundraising

Moderated by:
Brad Toben
Dean, Baylor Law

Panelists:
April Barton
Dean, Dusquesne University School of Law
Martin Brinkley
Dean, UNC School of Law
Lee Fisher
Dean, Cleveland Marshall College of Law
Gordon Smith
Dean, Brigham Young University School of Law


2:30-3:30 p.m.
Leadership Development Learning Outcomes and How to Implement Them

Moderated by:
Neil Hamilton
Co-director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, University of St. Thomas School of Law

Panelists:
Natalie Runyon
Director of Enterprise Content, Thomson Reuters
Liz Fraley
Professor, Baylor Law
Sara Berman
Director of Programs for Academic and Bar Success, AccessLex


3:35-3:55 p.m.
Sharing of Ideas, Innovations, and Questions

4:00-5:00 p.m.
Lawyers as Public Servants

Moderated by:
Judge Ed Kinkeade
U.S. District Court Northern District of Texas

Panelists:
Kyle Deaver
Mayor, City of Waco
Britney E. Harrison
President-Elect, Texas Young Lawyers Association
Judge Lora Livingston
261st Civil District Court, Travis County, Texas
Sen. Kirk Watson
Senate of Texas


5:00 p.m.
Reception at the Baylor Club

6:00 p.m.
Dinner at the Baylor Club - Leadership and the Law

James Baker III
Former United States Secretary of State

Introduced by:
Brad Toben
Dean, Baylor Law

Interviewed by:
Talmage Boston
Partner, Shackelford, Bowen, McKinley & Norton, LLP



Friday, March 27, 2020


7:30-8:00 a.m.
Breakfast

8:00-8:30 a.m.
Keynote Address

Judy Perry Martinez
President, American Bar Association


8:35-9:35 a.m.
Women Leaders Panel

Moderated by:
Jerry Clements
Chair Emeritus, Locke Lord LLP

Panelists:
Melissa Essary
Dean Emeritus and Professor of Law, Campbell Law School
Caren Lock
Regional Vice President and Associate General Counsel, TIAA
Judy Martinez
President, American Bar Association
Chief Judge Priscilla Owen
U.S. Court of Appeals Fifth Circuit


9:45-10:45 a.m.
Leadership of Differences

Moderated by:
Kellye Y. Testy
President and CEO, Law School Admission Council

Panelists:
Shafeeqa W. Giarratani
Shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Kathy Seward Northern
Associate Dean for Admissions and Associate Professor of Law, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law
Degna Levister
Associate Dean for Enrollment Management and Access Initiatives, City University of New York School of Law


11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Access to Justice and the Role that Law Schools Play

Chief Justice Nathan L. Hecht
Supreme Court of Texas

Interviewed by:
Doug Blaze
Former Dean, University of Tennessee College of Law


12:15-12:30 p.m.
Lunch
Sharing of Ideas, Innovations, and Questions
12:30-1:30 sp.m.
Leadership in the Military

JAG Panel
Moderated by:

Don Polden
Former Dean, Santa Clara University School of Law

Panelists:
Colonel Jerrett Dunlap
Former Chief, Career Management Branch, U.S. Army JAG Corps
Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Rockwell
Lieutenant General, The Judge Advocate General, U.S. Air Force


1:45-2:00 p.m.
Student Impact Panel

Former student members of Baylor Law's Leadership, Engagement, and Development (LEAD) Counsel give their thoughts and recommendations on the impact of participating in a leadership class while in law school.


2:15-2:30 p.m.
Final Thoughts and Comments

About the Speakers



Leah W. Teague
Associate Dean and Professor of Law, Baylor Law

Associate Dean Leah W. Teague’s 28-year tenure as an associate dean is unique in law school academe, especially at the same law school. When asked why and how she has been able to stay in this position when the average tenure at most other law schools is three to six years, her reply is, “I love Baylor Law and I believe in our mission. Baylor Law is a very special place. Baylor is rich in the tradition of faculty, staff, and even deans loving what they do here and choosing to stay long term. Dean Toben and I are in our 28th year working together for the law school and we have an incredible faculty who are just as committed as we are to our first priority—teaching and training the next generation of Baylor Lawyers. We have a great working relationship among the faculty and staff and we have talented and hard-working students. I am truly blessed to be part of the Baylor Law team.”

Dean Teague comes from a three-generation Baylor Law family. She followed in her father’s and brother’s footsteps and attended Baylor University (1983, B.B.A., summa cum laude). She never looked at another law school, even though she was fairly certain at the time she entered Baylor Law that with her accounting background she was not likely to want to be a trial lawyer. She recalls that she was surprised to find that she “enjoyed” the Practice Court experience, as much as one can, and she recognizes the valuable training and professional development gained through the experience which has served her well. After earning her J.D. cum laude in 1985, she entered private practice with the Waco law firm of Naman Howell Smith & Lee, where she practiced for four years in the firm’s business section. Her primary interest and focus was tax planning.

In addition to her administrative duties she teaches tax classes and the Leadership Engagement and Development course, which is part of Baylor Law’s unique Leadership Development Program. She also serves as the chair of the university’s Illuminate Steering Committee, a university faculty committee charged with assisting with the university academic strategic plan.

Dean Teague recognizes that being a lawyer is a privilege that requires her to give back to society. She is a member of the American Council on Education’s Women’s Network Executive Council and past chair for Texas Women in Higher Education. She serves on the Executive Committee of the Texas Federal Tax Institute. This year she joined the initial board of directors of Waco Entrepreneurial Ecosystem Collaborative, Inc., She is an elected member of the Texas Bar Foundation and a past president of the Waco-McLennan County Bar Association and Midway Education Foundation. She is an alumna of the Leadership Texas and Leadership America programs. She has been recognized as an Outstanding Alumnus for Leadership Waco and a Woman of Distinction by the Bluebonnet Council of Girl Scouts. Having participated in two Oxford Round Tables on the topic of the status of women leaders in society, she is highly involved in women’s leadership development efforts. She writes and speaks on tax, business, nonprofit, and leadership topics.

Dean Teague and her husband Ted are very active in the Waco community. Dean Teague’s two daughters and son-in-law are graduates of Baylor University. One of her daughters is also a graduate of Baylor Law.



Stephen Rispoli
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Pro Bono Programs, Baylor Law

Stephen Rispoli earned his political science degree from Baylor University in 2009, his J.D. from Baylor Law in 2012, and his LL.M. from the University of Texas School of Law in 2018.

Stephen worked as a District Director for former Texas State Representative Carol Kent. He describes his time working in the 81st Legislature as the experience that fostered his interest in the law. During law school, Stephen was active in student organizations, serving as the Executive President for the Student Bar Association, and Justice for the Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity. One of his most rewarding experiences in law school was interning for Federal Magistrate Judge Jeffrey Manske. While working for Judge Manske, Stephen learned a great deal about Federal procedure and the judicial process.

Service has always been an integral part of the law school’s mission and one to which Stephen has been dedicated since starting his career at Baylor Law. Stephen worked with Professor Bridget Fuselier on providing legal services to veterans and helped organize and expand the Veterans Clinic. The Veterans Clinic provides monthly clinics along with a dedicated estate planning clinic every year. As the Assistant Dean of Pro Bono Programs, Stephen is also actively involved in all other areas of pro bono service at Baylor Law. Stephen describes pro bono work at Baylor as a great learning experience for the students and much-needed help for the Waco community. He also strives to learn more about the access to justice gap our nation is facing, and what legal education can do to help.

Another integral part of Baylor Law’s mission is to prepare all students to be competent, ethical lawyers as soon as they cross the graduation stage and pass the bar. As Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, Stephen is always seeking new ways to accomplish this mission and help law students succeed at Baylor Law. Although Stephen believes that law school should be a challenging learning experience, he also believes that health and wellness are essential components of preparing to enter the practice of law. His goal is for the law school to help students develop lifelong habits that help address the stresses of the practice of law. In addition, he provides guidance and support to student organizations, working with them to achieve their goals and enhance the law school experience.

Stephen assisted Professor Jeremy Counseller in developing the St Andrews Academy of the Advocate, and continues to be involved as co-director of the program. Every summer, the Academy brings law students from around the country to St. Andrews, Scotland and immerses them in the art of trial and appellate advocacy.

Stephen’s wife, Jeanine, is a family lawyer who started her own law firm – Rispoli Law Firm, PLLC. In his free time, Stephen enjoys spending time with his wife and Khaleesi, their black lab, hunting, fishing, sailing, skeet shooting, and working on his 1968 Ford Torino.



Brad Toben
Dean, Baylor Law

Brad Toben looks upon his position as dean of Baylor Law, indeed he looks upon the profession of law, as a way to help individuals, his community and our larger society. “The law is a calling to serve. As lawyers, we meet people in their hour of greatest need. Their family relationships, their property, their business interests, and maybe even their civil liberties may be at stake. They're scared, worried, and feel adrift, and they come to their lawyer for guidance and solutions they can trust,” he said. “I hope all our law students adopt the mindset that they are not in this profession to advance self, for prestige or for hoped-for financial security - they are here to serve others. This truly is a vocation.” Dean Toben graduated from Baylor Law with the J.D. degree, with honors, in 1977, after completing his B.A., with honors, in political science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He received the LL.M. from Harvard Law School in 1981 and then taught at Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis.

He joined the Baylor Law faculty in 1983 and was named as Dean of the Law School in 1991. His academic interests have focused in the areas of commercial law and the relationship of debtors and creditors under state and federal law.

Dean Toben, the M.C. and Mattie Caston Professor of Law, is an elected member of the American Law Institute and has served by appointment of the Governor of Texas as a Commissioner to the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws. He has been recognized as an Outstanding Young Alumnus of Baylor University. He also has been recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Missouri-St. Louis and has received the University of Missouri-St. Louis Distinguished Alumni Political Science Award. Dean Toben was recently recognized by the Texas Trial Lawyers Association at a reception in his honor, for “exemplary service and commitment as a guiding light in legal scholarship and the pursuit of justice.”

Additionally, Dean Toben has participated regularly in accreditation and membership inspections of law schools for the American Bar Association and Association of American Law Schools, and has been active in the State Bar of Texas, especially in the bankruptcy specialization certification program. He is licensed in Texas and Missouri, practiced in St. Louis, Missouri, and was previously of counsel to the firm of Dawson & Sodd in Texas. He is a Master of the Bench in the Judge Abner V. McCall American Inns of Court and is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation. Dean Toben has been active in numerous civic and charitable activities and has served as an elder, trustee, deacon, and chair of the board of Central Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). For many years, he also has taught an adult Sunday School class at Central Christian. His wife, Beth, is a long time child sexual assault and abuse prosecutor. The Tobens have two children.



April Barton
Dean, Dusquesne University School of Law

April Barton became the new dean of the School of Law on July 1, 2019. She succeeds the Hon. Maureen Lally-Green, who has served as dean since 2017.

Barton most recently served as associate dean for academic affairs at Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. In that role, she oversaw the academic program and successfully launched numerous initiatives on leadership development, including a student Lawyers as Leaders program and a new course, Leadership and Management Skills for Lawyers.

At Villanova, Barton taught a course on administrative agency rulemaking and also has taught classes on computer law, the First Amendment and regulation in cyberspace and digital law. She previously served as director of the University's JD/MBA and JD/MPA joint degree programs as well as director of academic compliance and distance learning. Barton also served as assistant dean for academic computing and was the faculty director of the Global Democracy Project.

In addition to authoring Best Practices for Building a High-Tech Law School: The Process of Designing Educational Spaces published by the ABA's Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, Barton's work has been published in the Washington University Law Review, and the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology. She has presented and moderated discussions on innovations in law school teaching, law school distance learning, technology and classrooms of the future at Harvard Law School, New York Law School, the Gruter Institute, Carnegie Mellon University and the National Association of Attorneys General and Appellate Chiefs, among others. Barton also has testified before the U.S. Congressional Commission on Online Child Protection and the European Commission for Democracy through Law, Venice Commission, in Brussels.



Martin Brinkley
Dean, UNC School of Law

Martin H. Brinkley is Dean and Arch T. Allen Distinguished Professor of Law. Brinkley came to the deanship in 2015 directly from practice, the first person to do so in the modern history of the Law School. In his more than two decades at the bar, he practiced in the fields of corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, antitrust and regulated industries, public finance and charitable organizations law. He has been recognized in Chambers USA: America’s Leading Business Lawyers and Woodward/White’s The Best Lawyers in America.

At the law school, Brinkley teaches a transition-to-practice course on mergers and acquisitions. He has research interests in American legal history and the legal institutions of ancient Greece and Rome.

Brinkley is a graduate of Harvard University (A.B. summa cum laude, Classics) and the University of North Carolina School of Law, where he was executive articles editor of the North Carolina Law Review. He clerked for Chief Judge Sam J. Ervin, III of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Prior to law school, he was a fellow in papyrology at the University of Cologne. In 2011-12 Dean Brinkley served as President of the North Carolina Bar Association. He was elected to membership in the American Law Institute in 2003. He was the 2017 recipient of the Bar Association’s H. Brent McKnight Renaissance Lawyer Award and an Honorary Master of the Bench of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple.

Brinkley has served on the boards of or acted as pro bono counsel to dozens of nonprofit institutions with charitable, religious, artistic and educational missions. He is Vice Chancellor of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina and a former Senior Warden, Junior Warden and Vestryman of his parish. He is a passionate musician, performing as pianist of the Fairview Chamber Players and studying with Mimi Solomon and Myriam Avalos Teie. He is also an oboe student of Joseph Robinson, former Principal Oboe of the New York Philharmonic.



Lee Fisher
Dean, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Lee Fisher is the Dean and Joseph C. Hostetler-BakerHostetler Chair in Law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University.

Fisher’s diverse career has spanned the private, public, nonprofit, and academic sectors. In addition to serving as Dean, he is Senior Fellow, Cleveland State University’s Levin College of Urban Affairs, and Urban Scholar, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs and the Great Cities Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago. Fisher served as President/CEO of CEOs for Cities, nationwide innovation network for city success, for six years.

Fisher clerked for Judge Paul C. Weick of the U.S Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. He has decades of experience in legal practice, most extensively with Cleveland-based Hahn Loeser as Of Counsel from 1978-1990 and Partner from 1995-1999. He served as Ohio Attorney General and was the first Ohio Attorney General to personally argue cases before the Ohio Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit.

In addition to serving as Attorney General, Fisher has served as Ohio Lt. Governor; Director, Ohio Department of Development; Chair, Ohio Third Frontier Commission; State Senator; and State Representative. He also served as President and CEO of the Centers for Families and Children. Fisher is a graduate of Oberlin College and served on the Oberlin College Board of Trustees for 12 years. He earned his law degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law; he was the first recipient of the School of Law’s Distinguished Recent Graduate Award and was inducted in the School of Law’s Society of Benchers. He also earned his Master of Nonprofit Organization from the CWRU Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations.

Fisher is married to Peggy Zone Fisher, President and CEO of the Diversity Center for Northeast Ohio. They have two children, Jason, an actor in Los Angeles, and Jessica, a 2018 graduate of Cleveland State University.



D. Gordon Smith
Dean, BYU Law

Dean Smith is a leading figure in the field of law and entrepreneurship and has done foundational work on fiduciary theory. He has also made important contributions to the academic literature on corporate governance and transactional lawyering. After writing extensively about venture capital contracts early in his career, Dean Smith began thinking more broadly about the connections between law and entrepreneurship. Among other works, two articles with Darian Ibrahim of William & Mary Law School are aimed at advancing the nascent field of law and entrepreneurship. Law and Entrepreneurial Opportunities, 98 Cornell L. Rev. 1533 (2013); Entrepreneurs on Horseback: Reflections on the Organization of Law, 50 Ariz. L. Rev. 71 (2008). Dean Smith served as the associate director of the Initiative for Studies in Technology Entrepreneurship at the University of Wisconsin, where he launched the annual Law & Entrepreneurship Retreat. More recently, he co-founded (with Brian Broughman of the Indiana University School of Law) the Law & Entrepreneurship Association, a scholarly society that encourages the study of law and entrepreneurship by organizing conferences and building networks of scholars. He is also one of the founding faculty members of the Crocker Innovation Fellowship at BYU.

A Delaware corporate lawyer, Professor Smith has written extensively on fiduciary law, including two foundational pieces -- The Shareholder Primacy Norm, 23 J. Corp. L. 277 (1998) and The Critical Resource Theory of Fiduciary Duty, 55 Vand. L. Rev. 1399 (2002) -- that have become standard citations in the field. One of his more recent works, Fiduciary Discretion, 75 Ohio State L.J. 609 (2014) (with Jordan C. Lee), continues his effort to build an overarching theory of fiduciary law. Professor Smith also co-authors a popular teaching casebook, Business Organizations: Cases, Problems & Case Studies, with Professor Cynthia Williams of Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, and he is editing The Research Handbook on Fiduciary Law (Edward Elgar) with Andrew Gold of DePaul University College of Law.

Throughout his career, Dean Smith has been active in developing scholarly communities. In 2004 he co-founded (with Christine Hurt, also of BYU Law School) The Conglomerate Blog, a popular law professor blog focusing on business law. He has served as Chair of the Section on Business Associations in the American Association of Law Schools (AALS), and he participated in the creation of the Section on Transactional Law and Skills, for which he currently serves as Secretary. In 2009 he served on the planning committee for the AALS Workshop on Transactional Law. During that same year, he co-founded the annual Rocky Mountain Junior Scholars Forum. In 2012 he co-founded (with Afra Afsharipour of UC Davis School of Law) the Transactional Law Workshop, a monthly virtual gathering of transactional law scholars. And in 2013, he co-founded (with Colleen Baker) the Business Ethics Book Club, a virtual book club of law professors, who meet once a semester to discuss a recent work on business ethics.

During his five years as the Associate Dean of Faculty and Curriculum (2009-14), BYU Law School developed a large number of new course offerings, including a Law and Entrepreneurship Clinic. He has taught at six law schools in the U.S., as well as law programs in Australia, China, England, Finland, France, Germany, and Hong Kong. Before entering academe, Dean Smith clerked for Judge W. Eugene Davis in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and was an associate in the Delaware office of the international law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.



Neil Hamilton
Co-director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, St. Thomas School of Law

Neil Hamilton received his B.A. from Colorado College, his M.A. in Economics (Industrial Organizations) from the University of Michigan, and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

Professor Hamilton is Holloran Professor of Law and Founding Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions at the University of St. Thomas School of Law. He served as Interim Dean in 2012 and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs twice at St. Thomas. From 1980-2001, he served as Trustees Professor of Regulatory Policy at William Mitchell College of Law. He has taught Professional Responsibility and an ethics seminar to law students and professionals for over 30 years. He is the author of four books, over seventy law journal articles, and over 100 shorter articles as a bi-monthly columnist on professionalism and ethics for the Minnesota Lawyer from 1999-2012. Most recently, he published Roadmap: The Law Student’s Guide to Preparing and Implementing a Successful Plan for Meaningful Employment (ABA Books 2015), which received the American Bar Association’s Gambrell Award for excellence in professionalism.

Among other awards from the practicing bar, the Minnesota State Bar Association gave him its highest honor, the Professional Excellence Award, in 2004. He received the University of St. Thomas Presidential Award for Excellence as a Teacher and Scholar in 2009. And in 2012, Minnesota Lawyer honored him again for outstanding service to the profession and placed him in its Circle of Merit for those who have been honored more than once.

The Holloran Center, which Professor Hamilton directs, focuses on interdisciplinary research, curriculum development, and programs to help the next generation form professional identities with a moral core of responsibility for self and responsibility and service to others. Hamilton’s research and scholarship likewise focuses on the professional formation of new entrants into the ethics of the professions, particularly the legal profession.



Natalie Runyon
Director of Enterprise Content, Thomson Reuters

Natalie Runyon earned her M.B.A. from The George Washington University and her B.S. in International Trade and Finance from Louisiana State University. She completed an Organization Development & Leadership certificate from NYU in April 2016 and is a Certified Leadership Coach and Certified Protection Professional. She resides in New York City with her husband and two sons.

Natalie has more than 20 years of experience working and volunteering for multinational corporations, non profits, and the US Government - Thomson Reuters, Goldman Sachs, and the Central Intelligence Agency.

Currently, she is the director of enterprise content for talent, inclusion and culture within the brand marketing function of Thomson Reuters. Before her current role, she ran the strategy and operations team supporting key account programs within the Legal business, and before that, she ran global security in the Americas for three years. As a volunteer leader, she has led strategic leadership and change initiatives on the global and local levels for business resource groups at Thomson Reuters.

Natalie is a conference speaker and an author of articles for the Legal Executive Institute, The Glass Hammer, Security magazine, and CSO Online. Natalie was named one of the Top 20 under 40 in Security Director News in 2013. She also serves on the board of She Should Run, a non-partisan nonprofit focused on building the pipeline of women to run for elected public office in the U.S.; and the board of Middle Church, a faith institution in the East Village dedicated to nurturing souls, advocating for social justice, and standing up for those within marginalized communities.



Elizabeth Fraley
Professor, Baylor Law

Professor Fraley graduated from Newcomb College of Tulane University in 1985 before attending Baylor Law. While at Baylor Law, she was a member of the Baylor Law Review and active in national moot court and mock trial teams. Following graduation, she joined Scott, Douglass & Luton (now Scott, Douglass & McConnico) in Austin, becoming a partner in three years. Professor Fraley then opened Fraley & Fraley, LLP in Dallas in 1995 where she served as managing partner. The firm and Professor Fraley hold an AV Preeminent rating of 5.0/5.0 with Martindale Hubbell. She is admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and various U.S. District Courts. Her practice focuses on litigation and mediating medical malpractice claims, professional licensing claims, and business and commercial disputes, and she has tried more than fifty civil jury trials.

For years, Professor Fraley served as adjunct faculty for Baylor Law and SMU, teaching trial advocacy. She joined the Baylor Law faculty as a full-time professor in 2015. She is a frequent faculty member for NITA’s Southern Deposition Institute and serves as trial faculty for the Notre Dame Law School Intensive Trial Academy. She also serves on the faculty of Baylor Law’s Academy of the Advocate in St Andrews, Scotland and works with the Law School’s mock trial teams.

Professor Fraley is a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA) and has served on the Masters in Trial team. She is president-elect of the Waco ABOTA Chapter. She is a member of the Abner V. McCall Inn of Court where she serves as a Master. She has been recognized as a Super Lawyer by Texas Monthly annually since 2004 and has been named a Best Lawyer in Dallas by D Magazine annually since 2011. She is a frequent CLE speaker and contributor. She is the author of the updated version of Texas Courtroom Evidence.

Professor Fraley teaches Practice Court III at Baylor Law. This mandatory course focuses on trial and post-trial procedure, summary judgments, and jury selection. During this course, students plead, discover, and try a lawsuit from start to finish. Additionally, she assists Professor Gerald Powell, Director of the Practice Court program, in Practice Court II, which focuses on trial evidence, procedure, and advocacy. She teaches trial advocacy skills, including witness examination, opening statements, and closing arguments.

While serving full-time at Baylor Law, Professor Fraley also maintains a trial practice and actively tries cases. Periodically, her students have the opportunity to observe her in trial and are able to watch the techniques taught in her classroom put into practice in the courtroom.

Professor Fraley is a half-marathon runner, a traveler, and the proud mother of three children, twins Zach and Alex, and Katie.



Sara Berman
Director of Programs for Academic and Bar Success, AccessLex

Sara Berman received a B.A. in political science and French literature from the University of California - Santa Barbara and a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law. Her publications include Pass the Bar Exam: A Practical Guide to Achieving Academic and Professional Goals and Bar Exam MPT Preparation & Experiential Learning for Law Students: Interactive Performance Test Training and she regularly contributes to The Learning Curve, the official newsletter of the AALS Section on Academic Support.

Ms. Berman became the Director of Programs for Academic and Bar Success of AccessLex on January 29, 2018. Prior to this position at AccessLex Center for Legal Education Excellence, Ms. Berman served as Director of Critical Skills and Bar Success Programs at Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law. Ms. Berman had served as a Professor of Law since 1998 and had lectured nationwide for bar reviews for more than two decades, preparing students for both substantive and skills portions of bar exams across the country.



Kyle Deaver
Mayor, City of Waco

Kyle Deaver was elected Mayor on May 9, 2016 and was unopposed in the May 2018 election for his second two-year term as Mayor. He previously served four years on the Waco City Council as the representative for District V. Kyle is an attorney and businessman who is active in the Waco community.

Deaver is currently on the board of the Waco Foundation. He has served on the boards of the Cameron Park Zoological Society, Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce, Vanguard College Preparatory School, and St. Paul's Episcopal Day School. He served six years on the Waco Plan Commission.

Kyle is in partnership with his brother, John Deaver, in their law firm of Deaver and Deaver. They are also directors of American Bank and co-owners of American Guaranty Title. Kyle has a business degree and a law degree from Baylor University.

Kyle is married to Diane Elliott Deaver. Their growing family includes their two adult children: Morgan Snyder and her husband, Scott, and Nick Deaver and his wife Anna-Louise, as well as their daughter, Anna-Prescott.



Britney E. Harrison
President-Elect, Texas Young Lawyers Association

Britney is an experienced attorney who thrives on the personal touch of family law and the opportunity to guide clients through one of the most difficult times of life. Combining the advocate and counselor sides of being an attorney, she builds trust with clients and makes them feel comfortable. Most important, she strives to resolve marital issues while preserving respectful relationships.

Britney listens attentively to her clients and discovers the little details that can make a difference in their cases. She excels at developing creative solutions for custody and co-parenting issues. Britney begins with an amicable approach when it can produce favorable results for her clients, but will aggressively litigate matters if necessary. In the end, she understands that divorce is deeply personal because it involves family. Britney’s overall goal is to achieve the most satisfactory outcome that enables clients to find closure and make a fresh start.

In addition to family law, Britney has also practiced employment law and commercial litigation. Her diverse background has honed her ability to think on her feet in the courtroom, understand the different approaches of judges, and prepare clients for what to expect as their cases advance.

An Austin native, Britney was first in her undergraduate class at the University of North Texas. She received her law degree, with honors, from the University of Texas School of Law in 2010. Britney spent a semester abroad in Lyon, France, and loves traveling and spending time with her family. Of all her achievements, Britney is most proud of obtaining a job out of law school that gave her the income to put her dad through college.

Britney practices in both the Dallas area and Austin area.



Judge Lora Livingston
261st Civil District Court, Travis County, Texas

Judge Livingston is a 1982 graduate of the UCLA School of Law. She began her legal career as a Reginald Heber Smith Community Lawyer Fellow assigned to the Legal Aid Society of Central Texas in Austin, Texas. After completion of the two-year fellowship program, she continued to work in the area of poverty law until 1988 when she entered private practice with the law firm of Joel B. Bennett, P.C. In 1993, she and S. Gail Parr formed a partnership and opened the law firm of Livingston & Parr. She was engaged in a general civil litigation practice with an emphasis on family law. In January 1995, she was sworn in as an Associate Judge for the District Courts of Travis County, Texas. After her successful election, Judge Livingston was sworn in as Judge of the 261st District Court in January 1999. She is the first African-American woman to serve on a district court in Travis County, Texas. Since 2011, she has served as the Local Administrative Judge for the Travis County Courts.

Judge Livingston has been active in local, state and national bar association activities and has served on the boards of the Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation, Texas Access to Justice Commission, the National Center on Women and Family Law, the National Association of IOLTA Programs, the Judicial Section of the State Bar of Texas, and the Board of the Texas Center for the Judiciary. She is a member of the National Bar Association, the American Bar Association and the National Association of Women Judges. She has served as a delegate to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association (ABA) representing the State Bar of Texas and the Travis County Bar Association. Her ABA service includes Chair of the Commission on Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOLTA), Chair of the Standing Committee on the Delivery of Legal Services, Chair of the Standing Committee on Legal Aid and Indigent Defendants (SCLAID), member of the Standing Committee on Pro Bono and Public Service, member of the Commission on the Future of Legal Services, the ABA Center for Innovation and member of the ABA Judicial Division. She is a Texas Delegate to the ABA Judicial Division National Conference of State Trial Judges. She has also served on a number of committees in various state and local bar associations, including the Austin Bar Association, the Austin Black Lawyers Association and the Travis County Women Lawyers Association.

Judge Livingston is a proponent of pro bono activities and has served on the Board of Volunteer Legal Services (formerly Austin Lawyers Care). Judge Livingston is the 2015 Chair of “And Justice for All: An ABA Day of Service,” a National Pro Bono Celebration. Judge Livingston was instrumental in the establishment of the Travis County Self Help Center for self-represented litigants, and she led the effort to adopt a language access plan in the Civil Courts. She is a passionate supporter of access to justice initiatives on the local, state and national level.



Judge Ed Kinkeade
U.S. District Court Northern District of Texas

Judge Kinkeade received his B.A. from Baylor University in 1973. He then received his J.D. from Baylor University School of Law in 1974, his Master of Laws from the University of Virginia in 1998, his Honorary Doctor of Humanities from Dallas Baptist University in 2004, and his Honorary Doctor of Laws from Texas Wesleyan University School of Law in 2004.

Judge Kinkeade has served as a Judge for the Criminal Court No. 10 in Dallas County, Texas in 1981. Judge Kinkeade also served as a Judge on the Texas District Court, the 194th Judicial District, Dallas, Texas from 1981 to 1988, and a Justice on the Texas Court of Appeals, Fifth District from 1998 to 2002.

Judge Kinkeade was an associate at Dennis G. Brewer, Inc. from 1974 to 1975, and then a Partner at Power & Kinkeade from 1975 to 1980.

As an academic, Judge Kinkeade has served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Texas Wesleyan University School of Law from 1981 to 2011, and he currently is the Jurist-in-Resident at Baylor School of law.

Judge Kinkeade is currently a member of the American Bar Association, the State Bar of Texas, the Dallas Bar Association, the Texas Bar Foundation (Life Fellow), the American Law Institute, the Fifth Circuit District Judges Association, and the Federal Judges Association.



Senator Kirk Watson
Senate of Texas

Senator Watson graduated from Baylor University and then graduated first in his law school class at Baylor Law School. He has been named an outstanding young alumnus of Baylor, Young Baylor Lawyer of the Year, and the Outstanding Young Lawyer of Texas. He is currently of counsel at the law firm Husch Blackwell LLP. First elected to the Texas Senate in 2006, Senator Watson has been reelected four times. He represents most of Travis County and all of Bastrop County. In 2019, the Texas Senate elected Senator Watson to be the Senate’s President Pro Tempore for the 86th Legislature.

His priorities center on education, health care, transportation, government transparency, and state employees. He serves as vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Nominations and also sits on the committees overseeing Finance, Education, and Higher Education as well as the Sunset Advisory Commission.

As a cancer survivor, Senator Watson is passionate about making sure that all Texans have access to health care. He has been active in numerous health organizations, including the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and served on the original board of what is now known as the LiveStrong Foundation.

In 2011, Senator Watson laid out 10 Goals in 10 Years to transform the health and economy of Austin and Travis County. The results have been transformative, resulting in the creation of the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas and a new modern teaching and safety-net hospital, Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas. The American Medical Association recognized Senator Watson's contribution to healthcare with the prestigious Dr. Nathan Davis Award for Outstanding Government Service in 2017.

Building on those and other successes, Senator Watson launched a community-based effort to develop a center for world-class brain health treatment, research and education and has been honored by the Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute and NAMI Austin for his leadership.

Among many other recognitions, Senator Watson has been named one of the state's "10 Best Legislators" by Texas Monthly. The President of the University of Texas at Austin presented him with the prestigious President’s Citation. Watson also received the Pro Texana Medal of Service from Baylor University and the Baylor Line Foundation (formerly the Baylor Alumni Association) named him a Distinguished Alumnus. The Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas gave him its award as the Open Government Lawmaker of the Year and the Texas Press Association named him a Friend of the First Amendment for “his steadfast support of free speech and open government." He’s also been named Austinite of the Year by the Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce and received the W. Neal Kocurek Award for Healthcare Advocacy from People’s Community Clinic.

From 1991 to 1993, Watson served as Chair of the Texas Air Control Board, the state agency that was charged with addressing air quality in Texas. He was Vice-Chair of the committee that oversaw the consolidation of the Texas Air Control Board with the Texas Water Commission creating the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission, now known as the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

He also has served as Chair of both the Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce and the Texas Advisory Board of Environmental Defense, and he has been a member of the Executive Committee of the State Bar of Texas. He has chaired the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, the primary transportation planning agency for Central Texas.



James Baker III
Former United States Secretary of State

James A. Baker was appointed Secretary of State on January 22, 1989, and served until August 23, 1992. Baker brought almost two decades of experience in politics, both behind the scenes and in key administration positions with him to the State Department. As Secretary of State, Baker successfully oversaw United States foreign policy during the end of the Cold War, as well as during the First Persian Gulf War.

Born in Texas on April 28, 1930, Baker attended prep school in Pennsylvania, and went on to graduate from Princeton University in 1952. Following a two-year active rotation in the United States Marine Corps from 1952 to 1954, Baker received his law degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1957. He practiced law at the firm of Andrews and Kurth from 1957 to 1975, but it was not until the early 1970s that he became involved in politics.

Through the influence of his first wife, Baker became involved in the Republican Party and began a long political relationship with George H.W. Bush. Baker chaired Bush’s unsuccessful Senate campaign in 1970. In 1971 Baker became the Finance Chairman of the Republican Party and played a significant regional role in President Nixon’s reelection. During the Ford Administration he was appointed Under Secretary of Commerce.

Baker also managed President Gerald Ford’s election bid in 1976. In 1981, following a short run as chairman for George H.W. Bush’s Republican presidential primary campaign Baker was named President Ronald Reagan’s White House Chief of Staff.

During the second Reagan Administration, Baker simultaneously served as Secretary of the Treasury and as Chairman of the President’s Economic Council. Baker served as Secretary of State in George H.W. Bush’s cabinet from January 22, 1989 until August 23, 1992, when he was appointed Senior Counselor and White House Chief of Staff for President Bush. Baker continues to be active in politics and U.S. foreign policy.

As Treasury Secretary during the second Reagan Administration, Baker was instrumental in passing the Plaza Accord of September 1985, a multilateral agreement, which devalued the dollar in order to reduce America’s account deficit and help the U.S. economy recover from a recession that had begun in the early 1980s. He also tried to implement the Baker Plan, which proposed using Japan’s trade surplus to relieve Third World debt.

Baker served as Secretary of State during a very interesting and important time period in U.S. foreign relations. He was influential in overseeing American foreign policy during the tumultuous and touchy times following communism’s downfall in Eastern Europe and the break-up of the former Soviet Union.

As the head of the State Department, Baker was also the driving force behind creating a coalition of nations to repel Saddam Hussein and Iraq from Kuwait during the First Persian Gulf War.

Baker continues to play a role in U.S. diplomacy and international affairs. He served as a Personal Envoy of the United Nations Secretary-General for Western Sahara from 1997 to 2004. In 2006, the former Secretary of State served as the Republican co-chair of the Iraq Study Group, tasked with assessing America’s policy toward Iraq.



Talmage Boston
President, American Bar Association

Talmage is a partner in the Firm’s Dallas office who handles commercial litigation in both trials and appeals. During his 40-year career, he has successfully represented clients in state and federal court lawsuits and arbitrations involving oil and gas, real estate, banking, intellectual property, partnership disputes. He has successfully tried many jury trials throughout Texas and prevailed in appellate courts all over the state including the Texas Supreme Court and the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. In 2019, Talmage received the prestigious Terry Lee Grantham Memorial Award from the Texas Bar Foundation which is given annually to the Texas lawyer who is “an accomplished, talented, and dedicated Texas lawyer who is a servant of the profession and a dedicated advocate”.



Judy Perry Martinez
President, American Bar Association

Judy Perry Martinez of Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn in New Orleans is president of the American Bar Association, the largest voluntary association of attorneys and legal professionals in the world. Over the past 35 years, Martinez has held various leadership positions with the ABA, including chair of the Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary, which evaluates all nominees to the federal bench. Earlier, she served as the ABA’s lead representative to the United Nations and as a member of the ABA Board of Governors and its executive committee.

She also has served on numerous ABA committees dealing with critical issues in law and society. She served as chair of the ABA’s Presidential Commission on the Future of Legal Services and its Commission on Domestic Violence. She was a member of the ABA Commission on Women in the Profession, the ABA Task Force on Building Public Trust in the American Justice System, and the Council of the ABA Center on Diversity.

Between 2003 and 2015, while at Northrop Grumman Corporation, Martinez served as assistant general counsel-litigation before becoming vice president and chief compliance officer in 2011. After retiring from the aerospace technology industry, she spent a year as a fellow in residence at the Advanced Leadership Initiative at Harvard University. Martinez returned to Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, where she had worked as a commercial litigator from 1982 to 2003, rising to partner and member of the management committee.

Martinez has held several leadership positions within the New Orleans and Louisiana State Bar Associations, and she served on the board of the Innocence Project-New Orleans, the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, and as an officer of the World Justice Project. She also has served as a Distinguished Access to Justice Pro Bono Fellow for Southeast Louisiana Legal Services.

Among her various honors, Martinez received the Sam Dalton Capital Defense Advocacy Award from the Louisiana Association of Criminal Defense Counsel, the Distinguished Attorney Award from the Louisiana Bar Foundation, the Alliance for Justice Award from the National Gay and Lesbian Law Association, and the Michelle Pitard Wynne Professionalism Award from the Association of Women Attorneys. She was honored in 2017 with the Louisiana State Bar Association’s David A. Hamilton Lifetime Achievement Award and the New Orleans Bar Association’s Presidents’ Award.

She is a member of the board of directors of the American Bar Foundation, a fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the Louisiana Bar Foundation, and a member of the American Law Institute.

Martinez earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of New Orleans and her juris doctor, with honors, from Tulane Law School.



Jerry K. Clements
Chair Emeritus, Locke Lord LLP

Named One of the Top 50 Most Influential Women Lawyers by the National Law Journal and one of 30 Extraordinary Women in Texas Law by Texas Lawyer, Jerry Clements is Chair Emeritus of Locke Lord LLP after serving as Chair of the Firm from 2006-2017. She has been recognized as a Baylor Lawyer of the Year and been named one of the "Top Ten Litigators" in Dallas. During her more than 35 years of litigation experience, Jerry has worked collaboratively with high-level executives representing their Fortune 500 companies across a wide range of industries and built an impressive record of resolutions in complex disputes in the area of commercial litigation.

Under Jerry’s leadership, Locke Lord rose in the American Lawyer rankings from No. 110 to No. 60 and its annual revenue increased from $222 million to $449 million. She strengthened the Firm’s deep commitment to diversity and inclusion, and received numerous recognitions for its efforts. During her tenure as Chair, Locke Lord tripled the number of women and diverse lawyers in Firm management and nearly doubled the number of women and diverse lawyers in practice group leadership.

She also has extensive experience in corporate governance, having structured two significant law firm mergers during her tenure as Chair and has served as a Regent on the Baylor University Board of Regents since 2011. At Baylor, she currently serves as Chair of the Board of Regents. She also has served on committees dealing with audit and compliance, development, and governance, compensation and nominating.



Caren Lock
Regional Vice President and Associate General Counsel, TIAA

Caren K. Lock is the Regional Vice President and Associate General Counsel of TIAA. In her role at TIAA, Caren is the primary interface for the company on all legislative, executive, administrative, and regulatory matters in the southwest and mountain regions. She also directs all legislative lobbying and regulatory advocacy in her states. At the company, Caren is active in gender and racial diversity initiatives. She was the former Corporate Co-Chair of the Women’s Employee Resource Group and is currently a member of the Denver/Broomfield Leadership Council and Dallas Leadership Council.

Prior to joining TIAA, Caren was General Counsel with a consumer financial company. Before entering the corporate world, Caren spent over a decade litigating complex business matters including copyright and trademark infringement, employment discrimination, shareholder and partnership disputes, aviation, and toxic tort.

Caren is the Board Chair and a member of the Executive Committee at the Dallas Women’s Foundation. Caren is also an Exective Board member of the Texas State Bar College. Previously, she has also served on the Boards of Girls Inc. Metropolitan Dallas, Dallas Bar Association, State of Texas Asian Pacific Interest Section, and was President and former Board member of the Dallas Asian American Bar Association, and the Center for Nonprofit Management in Dallas. Caren is also a member of The Dallas Assembly and a graduate of The Leadership Dallas Program. From 2008 - 2013, she served on the Texas State Bar Grievance Panel and was Chair of her panel. Caren co-founded The Orchid Giving Circle that provides community grants to support social change and services to the DFW Asian Community.

Caren is a frequent speaker on racial and gender diversity, nonprofit regulatory issues, legal ethics and grievances, generational dynamics, and community and political engagement. She regularly presents at legal continuing education courses for the local and Texas bar organizations. In her spare time, she volunteers at the Cancer Support Community (formerly Gilda’s Clubhouse) teaching yoga to cancer survivors and their families. She resides in Allen with her husband, Michael Bahar, and her two sons.



Chief Judge Priscilla Richman Owen
United States Court of Appeals, 5th Circuit

Priscilla Richman Owen is the chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit. She joined the court in 2005 after being nominated by President George W. Bush (R). Owen became chief judge on October 1, 2019.

Born in Palacios, Texas, Owen graduated from Baylor University with her bachelor's degree in 1975 and from the Baylor University School of Law with her J.D. in 1977. She worked in private practice in Houston from 1978-1994, before being elected to the Texas Supreme Court in 1995. She served as a Texas Supreme Court Justice from 1995-2004.

Judge Owen was first nominated to the United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit by President George W. Bush (R) on May 9, 2001, to a seat vacated by William Garwood. The American Bar Association rated Owen Unanimously Well Qualified throughout her nomination process. Owen was confirmed on a recorded 55-43 vote of the U.S. Senate on May 25, 2005, and she received her commission on June 3, 2005.

Owen became chief judge of the 5th Circuit on October 1, 2019.



Melissa Essary
Dean Emeritus and Professor of Law, Campbell Law School

Melissa Essary joined Campbell Law School as its fourth dean in July 2006 following a 16-year career as a professor at Baylor University School of Law. Essary served as Campbell Law Dean for six years before moving into a full-time faculty position in July 2012.

Essary is a 1982 summa cum laude graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and a 1985 magna cum laude graduate of the Baylor University School of Law. While studying at Baylor Law, she served as Executive Editor of the Baylor Law Review. Following graduation, she served as a trial lawyer for two Texas firms, most notably the Vinson and Elkins firm of Dallas, where she litigated complex commercial cases.

Essary joined the faculty at Baylor Law in 1990 where she served with great distinction, teaching courses primarily in Employment Discrimination Law and Torts Law. She was a popular instructor, scholar, and speaker at Baylor and was awarded the university’s Outstanding Tenured Teacher Award in 2001. The Texas Bar Foundation awarded her the Outstanding Law Journal Article Award in 1997 for a series of articles entitled “Privacy in the Workplace.”

Upon joining Campbell Law, Essary immediately became a vital member of the Campbell University leadership team. In October 2007, the Campbell University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to relocate the law school from its traditional home on the Campbell campus in Buies Creek to a new location in the heart of downtown Raleigh, following the recommendation of a task force that she led. Under Essary’s leadership, the law school realized unprecedented demand from highly credentialed prospective students, raised the profile and scholarship of law faculty, and developed new business and community partnerships throughout Raleigh and across the state.

Essary has been appointed by the North Carolina Chief Justice to a three-year term on the Committee on Professionalism. She serves on the Wake County Bar Association’s Professionalism Committee. She recently completed a second term as Chair of the North Carolina Bar Association’s Law School Liaison Committee. An active member of the Raleigh community, Essary serves on the board of directors of the Triangle/Eastern NC chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and its Development Committee, as well as on the Board of Governors of the Brier Creek Country Club. She serves on the Board of Advisors for the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, where she also serves on the planning committee for the Executive Women’s Luncheon. She has served as Vice President of the Board of Governors of the North Carolina Bar Association, as well as on the Board of Directors of the Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce and its Government Affairs Committee, the Executive Board of Directors of the Downtown Raleigh Alliance, and the Board of Governors of the Cardinal Club in Raleigh. She also has served on the Strategic Planning Committee of the Public Service Committee of the Wake County Bar Association.

Since joining Campbell Law, Essary has been honored as a Woman of Justice by N.C. Lawyer’s Weekly. N.C. Business Leader media honored her several times for her work and leadership in the Raleigh region, including recognition as a Triangle Area Woman Extraordinaire, Business Impact Leader, and Education Impact Leader. She has received the Women of Achievement Award from the General Federation of Women’s Clubs of North Carolina in recognition of her professional and community work and serving as a role model for future generations. Essary and her husband, Larry, live in Raleigh. They have two daughters, Amber and Rachel.



Kellye Y. Testy
President and CEO, Law School Admission Council

Kellye Y. Testy is the president and chief executive officer of the Law School Admission Council, a 350-employee not-for-profit organization that serves as the leading assessment, data, and technology hub for law schools and their candidates in the United States, Canada, and throughout the world. Under her leadership, LSAC is committed to working collaboratively with its members, colleges and universities, leading organizations in legal education, business leaders, and, most importantly, potential law school candidates to build a more just and prosperous world. Named the nation's second most influential leader in legal education in 2017, Testy joined LSAC after leading the University of Washington School of Law for eight years as the school’s 14th dean and the first woman to hold that post. During her tenure, the school hired a new generation of outstanding faculty, established the endowed Toni Rembe deanship, launched both the Barer and the Gregoire Fellows programs, and secured the largest gift in the school’s history, a $56 million bequest from alumnus Jack MacDonald for student scholarships and faculty and program support. Testy also served as a professor and dean of Seattle University School of Law, where she founded several key programs, including the Access to Justice Institute and the Korematsu Center for Law and Equality. Known throughout academic and legal communities for her dedication to the rule of law and its commitment to justice and equality, Testy served as president of the Association of American Law Schools in 2016, with the presidential theme "Why Law Matters," to focus on how the law plays a critical role in setting the foundation for justice and human prosperity. She also served on the Executive Committee of AALS from 2013–2017, co-chaired the AALS Section for the Law School Dean, and served on the Committee on Recruitment and Retention of Minority Law Teachers and Students. In addition to her work with the AALS, Testy is a member of the American Law Institute and has served on the Board of Governors of the Society of American Law Teachers, as well as on several committees and initiatives of the ABA Section on Legal Education. She currently serves on the boards of the Washington Law Institute, a leadership development program designed to promote diversity in the legal profession, and LSSSE, a research institute focused on understanding legal education from the student perspective. She is a nationally sought-after speaker and consultant on legal and higher education, leadership, diversity and access, and corporate law and governance. Testy has received numerous honors and awards for her teaching, leadership, and service, including, most recently, the CLEO EDGE Award for Greater Equality and the MAMA Seattle 2018 Betty Binns Fletcher Leadership and Justice Award. Testy is a first-generation college graduate who is proud to have obtained both her undergraduate degree in journalism and her law degree from Indiana University in Bloomington, her hometown. She graduated summa cum laude from Indiana University Maurer School of Law—Bloomington, where she was editor-in-chief of the Indiana Law Journal. During law school, she worked for Kirkland & Ellis in Chicago and Ice Miller Donadio and Ryan in Indianapolis. After graduating, she clerked for Judge Jesse E. Eschbach, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.



Shafeeqa W. Giarratani
Shareholder, Ogletree Deakins

Shafeeqa Giarratani is a strong advocate for her clients. She is the Office Managing Shareholder for the Austin office. She represents employers in federal and state court and before administrative agencies and regulatory agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Texas Workforce Commission, and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs. Shafeeqa has been recognized both locally and nationally as a skilled advocate. Shafeeqa was named by Law360 as a 2016 Rising Star, one of only seven employment lawyers in the country to receive such a distinction. Shafeeqa has also been named repeatedly as a Super Lawyer–Texas Rising Star and was featured in Bloomberg BNA for her commitment to her clients.

She regularly handles litigation matters at both the trial and appellate level, in alternative dispute resolution and before governmental agencies. Shafeeqa has represented management in civil rights, wrongful discharge, Family and Medical Leave Act, Fair Labor Standards Act, employment tort, defamation, breach of contract, tortious interference and other employment-related charges and litigation.

Shafeeqa specializes in advising clients on whistleblower employment issues, in particular retaliation cases under the False Claims Act, and performing investigations. She advises clients on appropriate handling of whistleblowers, regularly handles litigation in this area, and performs in-depth investigations of all types.

Shafeeqa regularly advises clients that are federal contractors on affirmative action, legislative and regulatory changes affecting employment matters for federal contractors and Office of Federal Contract Compliance Program (OFCCP) compliance issues, from developing affirmative action plans to representing companies during the audit process.

Shafeeqa also performs supervisory training seminars, prepares and reviews personnel handbooks and policies and advises clients regarding employee retention and termination.



Kathy Seward Northern
Associate Dean for Admissions and Associate Professor of Law, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

Professor Kathy Seward Northern served as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert M. Duncan, Southern District of Ohio, following graduation from law school, and then became an associate with the law firm of Porter, Wright, Morris, & Arthur in Columbus.

In 1990, she joined the law faculty of Ohio Northern University, moving to Ohio State in 1991. She served as chair of the Ohio Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism and was a member of the Civil Justice Reform Act Advisory Group for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio.

Her research areas include the use of tort law in social policy formation, the application of traditional tort principles to mitigate the effects of environmental racism, and products liability.

She teaches Advanced Topics in Tort Law, Environmental Justice, Law & Technology, Products Liability, and Torts.



Degna Levister
Associate Dean for Enrollment Management and Access Initiatives, City University of New York School of Law

Degna P. Levister is presently the Associate Dean for Enrollment Management and Access Initiatives, Executive Director of Pipeline to Justice at the City University of New York School of Law. Dean Levister began her career as a Registered Professional Nurse. She holds a Master’s Degree from Columbia University Teacher’s College and received her J.D. from Brooklyn Law School, where she was awarded the Edward V. Sparer Public Interest Law Fellowship. Before joining the faculty of CUNY Law School in 2001, she ran the Urban Justice Center’s Homelessness Outreach and Prevention Project, which provides direct civil legal representation to the poor via soup kitchen/food pantry outreach clinics. Her prior work was in a variety of positions at the Legal Aid Society including the Brooklyn Office For The Aging, the Criminal Appeals Bureau, and the Bronx and Brooklyn Neighborhood offices.

As a Clinical Law Professor at the law school she has taught in every year of the program. Courses include 1L Lawyering Seminars, the Health Law Concentration, the Irene Diamond Professional Skills Center and the Pipeline to Justice. As Clinical Law Professor and Supervising Attorney at Main Street Legal Services, the law school’s clinic, she co-taught in the Economic Justice Project and in the Elder Law Clinic through December 2014. In January 2015 she stepped into the role of Interim Assistant Dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management.



Chief Justice Nathan L. Hecht
Texas Supreme Court

Nathan L. Hecht is the 27th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas. He has been elected to the Court six times, first in 1988 as a Justice, and most recently in 2014 as Chief Justice. He is the longest-serving Member of the Court in Texas history and the longest-tenured Texas judge in active service. Throughout his service on the Court, he has overseen revisions to the rules of administration, practice, and procedure in Texas courts, and was appointed by the Chief Justice of the United States to the federal Advisory Committee on Civil Rules. He is also active in the Court's efforts to assure that Texans living below the poverty level, as well as others with limited means, have access to basic civil legal services.

Chief Justice Hecht was appointed to the district court in 1981 and was elected to the court of appeals in 1986. Before taking the bench, he was a partner in the Locke firm in Dallas. He holds a B.A. degree with honors in philosophy from Yale University, and a J.D. degree cum laude from the SMU School of Law, where he was a Hatton W. Sumners Scholar. He clerked for Judge Roger Robb on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and was a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve Judge Advocate General Corps. He is President of the national Conference of Chief Justices, a Life Member of the American Law Institute and a member of Council, and a member of the Texas Philosophical Society.



Doug Blaze
Former Dean, University of Tennessee College of Law

Professor Blaze received his B.S. from Dickinson College in 197, and his J.D. summa cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center in 1984.

College of Law Dean Emeritus Doug Blaze has served on the college’s faculty since 1993, when he joined as the director of clinical programs. He served as dean of the College of Law from 2008 to 2015 until he returned to full-time teaching and serving as director of the college’s Institute for Professional Leadership, which he co-founded. He has also served as director of the Center for Advocacy and Dispute Resolution and interim associate dean for academic affairs.

Before coming to UT, Blaze was a member of the law faculty at Arizona State University and helped establish a community-based legal service clinic. He also practiced with the firm of Fennemore Craig in Phoenix, where his practice involved commercial and tort litigation. Blaze helped establish a new AALS Leadership Section, and is presently serving as chair-elect of the section. Blaze previously served on the ABA council on legal education and admission to the bar standards review committee, the AALS membership review committee, and the TBA evolving legal markets committee. He was appointed as an inaugural member of the Tennessee Supreme Court Access to Justice Commission in 2009, and served as chair from 2014 to 2016.

He has received numerous honors and awards, including UT’s prestigious Thomas Jefferson Prize and the president’s Macebearer Award. He received the Harold Love Outstanding Community Service Award from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and the UT National Alumni Association Public Service Award. In 2013, Blaze received the Deborah Rhode Award from the Association of American Law Schools for his work in promoting pro bono and access to justice. He also received the Bass, Berry & Sims Award for outstanding service to the bench and bar, the Harold Warner Outstanding Teacher Award, and the Carden Institutional Service Award. For his efforts to promote equal access to justice in Tennessee, he received the B. Riney Green Award in 2003.



Colonel Jerrett Dunlap
Former Chief, Career Management Branch, U.S. Army JAG Corps

Colonel Jerrett (Jerry) Dunlap, U.S. Army, most recently served in the Pentagon as the Chief, Career Management Branch, U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps, Headquarters, Department of the Army. Prior to that, he served as the Deputy Staff Judge Advocate for XVIII Airborne Corps and the Staff Judge Advocate for Headquarters, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. His experience includes assignments as an Associate Professor at The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center & School (TJAGLCS), a Litigation Attorney for the U.S. Army Legal Services Agency, and in numerous legal positions in Alaska, Germany, and while deployed to Iraq. He joined the Army in 1998, and completed the Judge Advocate Officer Basic and Advanced Courses at TJAGLCS in Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He holds a B.S. in Economics from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, a J.D. from J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University, and an L.L.M in Military Law from TJAGLCS. He is married to Tammy Dunlap and together they have three children. He is currently a student with the Carlisle Scholars Program at the United States Army War College, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.



Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Rockwell
Lieutenant General, The Judge Advocate General, U.S. Air Force

Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Rockwell is The Judge Advocate General, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Arlington, Virginia. In that capacity, General Rockwell serves as the Legal Adviser to the Secretary and Chief of Staff of the Air Force, and all officers and agencies of the Department of the Air Force. He directs all judge advocates in the performance of their duties and is responsible for the professional oversight of more than 2,200 judge advocates, 350 civilian attorneys, 1,400 enlisted paralegals and 500 civilians in the Total Force Judge Advocate General's Corps worldwide, overseeing military justice, operational and international law, and civil law functions at all levels of Air Force command.

General Rockwell entered the Air Force through the Direct Appointment Program in June 1987. He has served as the Deputy Judge Advocate General, Commander of the Air Force Legal Operations Agency, and as a Staff Judge Advocate five times. He has written on several national security law matters, advancing Department of Defense and United States government interests on a variety of topics to include: Military Justice; United States government liability for civilian use of the Global Positioning System; customary international law; European Union law; rule of law development in Romania; the Solidarity movement in Poland; an interagency legal capability for rule of law development and State-Building; and the politics of strategic aircraft modernization. He has also authored several chapters in the DoD Law of War Manual, the Army Operational Law Handbook, and the Air Force Operations and the Law Handbook, in addition to contributing to the Tallinn Manual on International Law Applicable to Cyber Operations, and current efforts to publish manuals on international law applicable to military uses of outer space.



Donald J. Polden
Dean Emeritus, Santa Clara University School of Law

Professor Polden received his B.B.A. from George Washington University in 1970 and his J.D. cum laude from Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis in 1975.

Professor Polden served as Dean of Santa Clara University School of Law from 2003 to 2013. In addition to his service as dean, he is a well-known scholar in the areas of employment law and legal education and has practiced law, principally in the areas of federal antitrust law and employment law, in the federal and state courts. He is co-author (with U.S. District Court Judge Mark Bennett) of Employment Relationships: Law and Practice, published by Aspen Publishing Company. He also is the author of several law review articles on topics of federal antitrust and securities law and legal education and he is a contributing writer on employment law and business topics to Huffington Post.

Previously to being appointed as Santa Clara Law’s Dean, Polden served as Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Memphis (1993-2003).

At Santa Clara University School of Law, Dean Emeritus and Professor Polden was instrumental in developing the curriculum for leadership education, a movement that is growing in significance in American legal education. He also served as chair of the American Bar Association’s Standards Review Committee during the ABA’s revisions to the accreditation policies for American legal education. He was elected to membership in the American Law Institute in 1992, selected for membership in the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and serves as chair of the Advisory Board of the Institute of Sports Law and Ethics. He also continues his work on leadership education for lawyers and law students with several national organizations including the Center for Creative Leadership.

During his service as Dean, the School of Law completed its first major capital campaign (which included 43 newly endowed student scholarships), initiated the second major campaign emphasizing funding for the new law school building (a project coming to a very successful conclusion soon!), hired almost a third of its full time faculty (including several “junior” faculty members who have developed into national stars!) , was initiated into the national Order of the COIF (the Phi Beta Kappa of legal education), secured the gift and launched the annual Katharine & George Alexander Prize, launched the tremendously successful annual Jerry Kasner Estate Planning Seminar, and grew the summer international programs to ten with addition of programs in Munich, The Hague and San Jose, Costa Rica.