Pictures, Portraits & Snapshots: Glimpses into Baylor's Special Libraries

On Friday, October 30, 2020, Keston Center researchers participated in a virtual “speed panel” titled Pictures, Portraits & Snapshots: Glimpses into Baylor’s Special Libraries. Keston Director Kathy Hillman coordinated the event. Presenters from the Armstrong Browning Library, the Institute for Oral History, Keston, The Texas Collection, and the W.R. Poage Legislative Library provided 3-minute previews of exceptional treasures in each collection’s holdings. A live and lively Q&A session followed.

For a recording of the event, visit  www.baylor.edu/library/glimpses

Keston representatives Wallace Daniel and Alice Luňáková offered insights into significant items that they discovered in their research in the Keston Archives.

 

 

 

 

Wallace Daniel, Mercer University

Distinguished University Professor of History at Mercer University, Dr. Wallace Daniel taught Russian history at Baylor where he served as History Department Chair and Dean of Arts & Sciences. He has recently written books on Father Aleksandr Men and Women of the Catacombs in Stalin’s Russia and is preparing a biography of Russian priest and dissident Father Gleb Yakunin.  

TOPIC: “Father Gleb Yakunin and Documents of the Christian Committee for the Defense of Believer’s Rights in the USSR”

FEATURED ITEM: Photograph of Father Gleb Yakunin and Bound Documents of the Christian Committee for the Defense of Believer’s Rights in the USSR

 

 

 

 

Alice Luňáková, Masaryk University, Czech Republic

Born in Czechoslovakia, Alice Luňáková grew up in Prague, Czech Republic. She earned her graduate degree in English and French at Masaryk University an did further study at Laurentian University in Canada. A former exchange student at McLennan Community College in Waco, Alice used both the Keston Center and The Texas Collection in researching her thesis on 19th Century Czech Migration in Texas.

TOPIC: “50 Years Later: Prague Spring and the Death of Jan Palach”

FEATURED ITEM: Newspaper Article: Prague Spring January 26, 1969: “Why Jan Palach Died”