Dr. Kevin G. Pinney

Dr. Kevin G. Pinney

Dr. Kevin G. Pinney serves as professor of chemistry in Baylor University’s College of Arts and Sciences and also is a member of The Institute of Biomedical Studies. A graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University (BA) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (BS, PhD), he also held an NIH postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of South Carolina.

Working in collaboration with Dr. Mary Lynn Trawick at Baylor and researchers at other institutions in the United States and abroad, Dr. Pinney is a leading researcher in the fight against cancer. The collaborative team is involved in the discovery and development of small-molecule inhibitors of tubulin polymerization that function dualistically as both cytotoxic agents that arrest cancer cell replication and as vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) that selectively destroy tumor-associated vasculature, thus starving tumors of necessary oxygen and nutrients. Additionally, their cancer research is focused on developing anti-metastatic drugs to prevent the disease from spreading.

The director of the Pinney Research Laboratory at Baylor University, Dr. Pinney is the author of numerous peer reviewed articles and book chapters and is a co-inventor on 25 issued patents along with several pending patent applications. Collaborative research funding is currently provided by grants from The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) and Mateon Therapeutics, Inc. A renewal application from a recently completed grant from The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is pending review.

Dr. Pinney joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Baylor University in 1993. He has received a variety of teaching and faculty awards including the Outstanding Faculty Award for Scholarship for the College of Arts and Sciences, the Cornelia Marschall Smith Professor of the Year Award, and was named one of two Mentors of the Year for undergraduate STEM research. He teaches classes at both the undergraduate and graduate level in the area of organic chemistry.