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Apr
15
2018
Aguiņaga, Honors College Alumnus and Supreme Court Law Clerk, to Address Honors Convocation
The Honors College is excited to announce that Ben Aguiņaga, BBA ‘12, will provide the keynote address at the Honors Convocation on April 20th. Aguiņaga was recently selected to serve as a law clerk to United States Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito. During his time at Baylor, Aguiņaga was in the Honors Program double majoring in political science and philosophy with minors in mathematics and history.
Apr
13
2018
Senior University Scholar Studies Sleep, Discrimination
As spring graduation and commitment dates for graduate and professional schools approach, many faculty and staff commemorate their students’ achievements. Keller senior Stacy Nguyen started in the Sleep Neuroscience & Cognition Laboratory (SNaC) in August 2015. Nguyen has worn several hats both in the lab and as an undergraduate student.

“I got connected with it by luck actually,” Nguyen said. “A poster at Undergraduate Research and Scholarly Achievement (URSA) in Spring 2015 caught my eye, and I noticed the logo on top and was intrigued that there was a sleep lab at Baylor.”
Apr
11
2018
Baylor University Student Organizations Serve In Guatemala
The teams were among 14 groups of nearly 250 students, faculty and staff who served in seven countries in early March. Each team had a discipline-specific focus to their missions, actively integrating their faith with service and learning. They were able to use their academic perspective and passions to approach challenges and solutions in Guatemala.

The Honors Residential College partnered with Potter's House, an organization that works with people who live around the Guatemala City trash dump. Senior Jordan Millhollin said they witnessed an incredible level of poverty and human suffering. Neighborhoods of houses were made from tin and scraps of cinder blocks and piles of trash lining the street were sorted by workers hoping to sell the scraps for a little bit of cash.
Apr
9
2018
University Scholar Student Receives Prestigious Toxicology Award
On Mar. 11, Jo, a University Scholar concentrating in environmental health science received the Pfizer Society of Toxicology undergraduate research travel award at its 57th annual meeting in San Antonio. Jo was one of only 14 recipients of the award recognized.

Jo said that the award and her research has greatly affected her time at Baylor and looks forward to the future.

“I have been working on this project for two years, and even though it’s been quite challenging it has been very worthwhile,” Jo said. “I have learned a lot by working closely with professors and graduate students who are always willing to help and who have become great mentors throughout these two years.”
Mar
26
2018
Defending Disinterest
Dr. Elizabeth Corey, Director of the Honors Program and Associate Professor of Political Science, has an article titled “Defending Disinterest” in the Spring 2018 issue of National Affairs. National Affairs is a quarterly journal of essays about domestic policy, political economy, society, culture, and political thought. It aims to help Americans think a little more clearly about our public life, and rise a little more ably to the challenge of self-government. Each issue features lively yet serious essays on the range of domestic issues: from economics and health care to education and welfare; from the legal debates of the day to enduring dilemmas of society and culture.
Mar
26
2018
Phi Beta Kappa Offers Membership to 32 Honors College Students
PHI BETA KAPPA, the nation’s oldest scholastic honor society and the first American society to have a Greek-letter name, announced its 2018 inductees earlier this month. The Honors College is proud to have 32 students, 40% of the Baylor Honorees, being offered membership this year. This distinction is universally recognized as the most prestigious academic honor awarded at the baccalaureate level.
Mar
15
2018
Honors Residential College Students Spend Spring Break in Guatemala
This spring break, Baylor Missions sent students and faculty to seven different countries: Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico and United States. Each team’s mission project was discipline-specific, allowing students to use skills they are developing in their classes to serve in other cultures.
Mar
14
2018
The Washington Post: How the Oscar-winning ‘Coco’ and its fantastical afterlife forced us to talk about death.
Candi Cann, Ph.D., associate professor in the Baylor Interdisciplinary Core in the Honors College who studies death and the afterlife, is quoted in this Acts of Faith column about the Academy Award-winning animated film “Coco” and how Americans remain mostly uncomfortable or unwilling to think deeply or talk with others about what they do believe and imagine, if anything, about the afterlife.
Mar
2
2018
Kathleen, Rachel and Deirdre: Three Women’s Journeys United by an Archival Collection
When Rachel entered Baylor University her freshman year, she thought she wanted to pursue a career in Biblical archaeology. She decided to major as a University Scholar, a build-your-own-path program for high-achieving students that would allow her to bring in elements of religion, Biblical languages, anthropology and more. And it was while sitting in her Hebrew I course – taught by Dr. Fulton – that the focus of her academic career (and possibly her life) was changed thanks to a random question.
Feb
27
2018
Honors College Helps Sponsor 41st Annual Big XII Conference on Black Student Government
Baylor University will host The Annual Big XII Conference March 1-3. The Honors College is proud to have a current BIC student, Eniya Richardson, serving as the Transportation Chair on the Conference Planning Committee as well as our Financial Manager, Ryan Reed, presenting during the conference. The Big XII Council on Black Student Government is a regional Black Student Governing Body, which consists of the Black Student Governments from institutions in the Big XII conference.
Feb
9
2018
Baylor University Receives $1.5 Million Grant from Lilly Endowment for Project to Assist Congregations with Ministries that Explore Vocation
“The Soundings Project, so generously funded by Lilly Endowment, aims to support the common work of the Christian university and the church, namely to help people lead lives of purpose and significance,” said Darin H. Davis, Ph.D. Darin H. Davis is vice president for university mission and director of the Institute for Faith and Learning (IFL). He holds a faculty appointment in the Honors Program and is affiliated faculty in the Department of Philosophy and Baylor’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary. “During the next five years, we hope to explore and nurture, along with congregations throughout the state, new models and approaches to the enduring question ‘How is God calling me — and us — to be faithful?’”
Feb
5
2018
Jamaican Essayist Tells Baylor Crowd that Walking Helps Him Coexist with Others
“What does it mean to coexist?”

This is a question that professor and essayist Garnette Cadogan, regularly asks his students at Massachusetts Institute of Technlogy (MIT). Cadogan, who penned the essays, “Walking While Black” and “Due North,” attempts to answer this question every night as he walks the city streets and interacts with those he encounters.
Jan
26
2018
Senior Junelyn Gamao, BIC Student, couldn’t ignore the draw to do more after assisting with research at Waco’s Family Health Center during her sophomore year.
“I realized how much the city was lacking in terms of access to nutritious foods and having adequate food and nutrition literacy,” she says.
Jan
19
2018
Baylor University will welcome high-achieving prospective students to campus for Invitation to Excellence, a special weekend program Jan. 19-20 that showcases several exceptional academic opportunities, including one of the newer opportunities, the Getterman Scholars Program, offered by Baylor.
Jan
11
2018
The Italian Dig
Through an unexpected friendship initiated on the Vegas Strip more than a decade ago, faculty and students from Baylor are leading the San Giuliano Archaeological Research Project, a large-scale excavation of ancient Etruscan and medieval remains in central Italy.
Jan
9
2018
Why the Humanities Matter: Intellectual Freedom, Self-Mastery, and the Liberal Arts
A frequent visitor to Baylor University and now with an appointment as Distinguished Senior Fellow in the Institute for the Study of Religion, Robert George returns to campus, this time to address the topic of intellectual freedom, self-mastery, and the liberal arts on January 22 at 4 PM with a reception immediately following in the Alexander Reading Room.
Jan
4
2018
Wokeness and Myth on Campus:  Crying “free exchange of ideas!” misses the cultural meaning of protest in a society coming apart
Alan Jacobs, a New Atlantis contributing editor, is a distinguished professor of the humanities in the honors program of Baylor University. He is the author, most recently, of How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds (Currency, 2017). Portions of this essay have been adapted from his New Atlantis blog Text Patterns.
Dec
14
2017
Alan Jacobs on How to Think
Conversation with Alan Jacobs, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the Honors Program in Baylor’s Honors College and author of “How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds.”
Dec
11
2017
Feeling guilty about drinking? Well, ask the saints
Michael Foley, Ph.D., associate professor of patristics in the Great Texts Program of the Honors College, writes that he discovered “an astonishing history” about the role that pious Christians — many of them monks — played in developing and producing alcohol. Catholic missionaries from Europe brought their knowledge of vine-growing with them to the New World so they could celebrate the Eucharist, which requires the use of bread and wine. They also improved processes for brewing beer and making grape brandies. During earlier times, alcohol was instrumental in promoting health, killing germs when mixed with water. Also, the monks merged land, special knowledge, teamwork and commitment to excellence because they viewed doing “even the smallest of chores as a means of glorifying God.”
Nov
17
2017
Student Regents Bridge Gap Between Students and Key Decision Makers
Feature on Baylor Student Regents Hannah Vecseri, a senior University Scholar from Houston, who is in the Honors Program studying political science, great texts and finance, and Will Cassara, a junior from Keller, who is pursuing a B.B.A. in finance and management. Throughout the 2017-2018 school year, Vecseri and Cassara have worked to share the perspective of the student body with the Board.
Nov
15
2017
Abby Fahnestock, University Scholar Graduate, Shares How She Got Accepted to Medical School
Abby Fahnestock grew up in Detroit, MI, and received a B.A. in University Scholars from Baylor University, where she concentrated in Medical Humanities, Great Texts of Western Civilization, and Spanish. Abby is currently a 1st-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. She has traveled to 10 countries, including the Netherlands, Italy, and Zambia.
Nov
8
2017
A Transformative Academic Community
Dean Thomas Hibbs talks about working toward Tier 1 status, Baylor’s Christian mission, and how the the Honors College’s rigorous programs serve both.
Oct
25
2017
Church that Worships AI God May Be the Way of the Future
Candi Cann, Ph.D., associate professor in the Baylor Interdisciplinary Core in the Honors College, is quoted in this article about Way of the Future, a nonprofit religious corporation established in California dedicated to worshiping artificial intelligence. “For me, this is more like a new paradigm out of which new religious practices could emerge,” Cann said. “It doesn't seem like a religion as much as a religious worldview. Along those lines, secularism is a religious worldview.”
Oct
15
2017
How American Politics Became So Exhausting
The Atlantic conducts this Q&A with Alan Jacobs, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the Honors Program in Baylor’s Honors College, about his new book, “How to Think,” which The Atlantic describes as “part essay, part lament, part how-to guide for processing the world more generously” in an era that might, or might not be, the uncivil political era of all time. “Maybe it’s inevitable that today’s hyper-partisanship and lightning-fast news cycles have left the open-minded Jacobs frustrated with America’s low tolerance for disagreement—a political order characterized by ‘willful incomprehension (and) toxic suspicion,’ as he calls it.”
Oct
13
2017
Jesse Watters: Society of Catholic Liturgy
The Society of Catholic Liturgy conference allowed me to meet some of the world's top liturgical scholars and listen to them discuss the current state of the Catholic Church.
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