Melinda Nielsen

Assistant Professor of Classical Literature

Nielsen1 Brooks College 157
Tel: (254) 710-7683
Email: Melinda_Nielsen@baylor.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
  • M.A., University of Notre Dame
  • B.A., Hillsdale College

Specialties

  • Boethius
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Medieval English Literature

Research Interests

The translation and reception of classical learning in medieval literature.

Books

  • Editor and translator, Speculum humanae salvationis (Brill, forthcoming 2019)
  • Editor and translator. Prosper of Aquitaine’s Liber epigrammatum. Contracted with Library of Early Christianity, Catholic University of America Press.

Peer-reviewed Articles

  • “Scholastic Persuasion in Thomas Usk’s Testament of Love,” Viator: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 42.2 (August 2011): 183-203.
  • "Emending Oneself: Compilatio and Revisio in William Langland, Ranulph Higden, and Thomas Usk." In New Directions in Medieval Manuscript Studies and Reading Practices: Essays in Honor of Derek Pearsall's 80th Birthday, ed. John Thompson, Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, and Sarah Baechle (University of Notre Dame Press, Spring 2014).
  • “The Christian Socrates: Autobiography and Conversion in the Consolation of Philosophy," LOGOS 17.3 (Summer 2014): 143-157.
  • “Education’s Discarded Image: C. S. Lewis and the Theological Tradition of the Liberal Arts,” Pro Ecclesia: A Journal of Catholic and Evangelical Theology 42.3 (Summer 2015): 271-88. Co-authored with Philip G. Nielsen.
  • 5. "‘Nothing Almost Sees Miracles / But Misery’: Epicurean Causality and the Ascetical Journey in King Lear,” LOGOS 19.4 (Fall 2016): 101-116.
  • “Translating Lady Philosophy: Chaucer and the Boethian Corpus of Cambridge University Library MS. Ii.3.21,” The Chaucer Review 51.2 (April 2016): 209-226.
  • “Being Boethius: Vitae, Politics, and Troth in Thomas Usk’s Testament of Love,” Studies in Philology 115.1 (Winter 2018): 25-47.
  • “Putting Boethius back into the Boece: the ethics of authorship in the Boke of Coumfort,” The Chaucer Review 54 (forthcoming 2019).

Work in Progress

  • Article on Augustine and Boethius
  • Article on John Henry Newman and C. S. Lewis