Student Research Opportunities in Physics

Below you will find a listing of all available research opportunities in Political Science. Please use the contact information listed in each posting for further information regarding the research opportunities.


Jeffrey Olafsen

Interdisciplinary Research in Physics

My research interests focus on nonlinear, non-equilibrium and chaotic systems. The projects tend to be table top in scope which allow students to be exposed to both experimental as well as theoretical aspects of the research. The research questions also naturally lend themselves to interdisciplinary research questions that connect different disciplines. Because of this, I have supervised students in physics as well as biology, chemistry, mathematics and engineering. Outcomes for prior students have included theses, journal articles and presentations at national meetings. A sample of papers published: 1. B. Bammes and J. S. Olafsen, "Empirically modeling polymer collapse in a poor solvent via a non-equilibrium, granular chain experiment." Granular Matter, Volume 16, Number 2, 16: 259 – 268 (2014). 2. L. J. Olafsen, I. K. Eaves, and J. S. Olafsen, "Synchronized Mid-infrared Beam Characterization of Narrow Gap Semiconductors," American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings, 1416, pp. 88-90; doi:10.1063/1.3671705 (2011). 3. K. Combs, J. S. Olafsen, A. Burdeau, and P. Viot, "Thermostatistics of a single particle on a granular dimer lattice: Influence of defects." Physical Review E, 78, 042301 (2008). 4. S. Feldt and J. S. Olafsen, "Inelastic Gravitational Billiards." Physical Review Letters, 94, 224102 (2005).

Recommended Pre-requisites: Minimally any indructory science sequence if not PHY I & II
Course Credit Offered: Yes
Begin Date: Projects may begin at any time 
Semesters Available: fall/spring/full summer
Contact Information: Jeffrey_Olafsen@baylor.edu
 


Howard Lee

Nano-optics science and applications

Our research focuses on developing new techniques, including emerging active materials and nanostructures, to control the interaction between light and matter at the nanometer length-scale, and to study new optical phenomena for developing novel nanophotonic applications.

Receommended Pre-requisites: NA
Course Credit Offered: Yes
Semesters Available: fall/spring/full summer
Contact Information: Howard_Lee@baylor.edu


Gerald Cleaver

Physics

Dr. Cleaver’s primary research interests are string/M Theory, quantum gravity, and early universe cosmology

Recommended Pre-requisites:
Course Credit Offered:
Begin Date: ongoing
Contact Information: Gerald_Cleaver@baylor.edu


Kenneth Park

Surface defects & nanoparticles on TiO2, Alkali metal adsorbed on MoS2: Electron donor-acceptor complex, and metal-organic interface: Thin films of metallo-phthalocyanine (MPc, M = Cu, Ni, Co, and Fe)

Dr. Park’s research interests have been centered on understanding of surface atomic and electronic structures and their effect toward adsorbates. In the past several years, he has investigated defect formation, their atomic structure, and local stoichiometry on single crystal TiO2 surfaces. Particularly using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, he studied the relationship between local stoichiometry and structure in nanometer-sized surface defects and their chemical property. Another active research interest involves molecular ordering and thin film structures at the interface between metallo-phthalocyanine (MPc, M = Cu, Ni, Co, and Fe) molecules and single crystal metal surfaces.

Recommended Pre-requisites:
Course Credit Offered:
Begin Date: ongoing
Contact Information: Kenneth_Park@baylor.edu


Zhenrong Zhang

Physics

The research in her group is experimental physics, which involves optical physics, electrochemistry, programming, and mechanical design. If you enjoy hands-on experiences, this could be a good fit for you.

Recommended Pre-requisites:
Course Credit Offered:
Begin Date: ongoing
Contact Information: Zhenrong_Zhang@baylor.edu