CSA Incident Report

Step 1CSA Incident Report

Step 2Confirm Report

Step 3Finished

CSA Incident Report
The purpose of THE CLERY ACT is to encourage accurate and timely reporting of campus crime statistics. The goal of the Clery Act is to provide information to the campus community to promote crime awareness and to enhance campus safety through providing reliable statistical records. This report form provides a uniform method to document reportable crimes and/or non-criminal hate motivated incidents that have occurred on and around Baylor Clery reportable geography, which have been reported to a Campus Security Authority (CSA) other than the Baylor Police Department. CSA's are defined as someone who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

The information collected is not intended to be used to identify the victim, but rather to meet CLERY ACT requirements and to be used to increase public safety.

It is the policy of Baylor University to encourage victims and/or witnesses of crime(s), who do not wish to remain anonymous to report such crimes to the police and/or to a designated Campus Security Authority.

For CLERY purposes, Baylor affiliation of the involved parties is not a relevant fact as to whether or not this report form is to be completed. If a violation of a Clery crime occurs, documentation is required.

CLERY documentation is not satisfied by simply directing/referring the reporting party to the police department. In order for the University to satisfy the statistical reporting requirements of the Clery Act, all CSA's are required to complete this form when offenses are reported to them.
Incident Overview

CSA (Your) Contact Information

Incident Information
Offense Type

Bias, Discrimination, Hate Crimes

Prejudice CategoryPlease select any/all that apply

Location of Incident
On-campus: Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution of higher education within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including student halls; and property within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).

On-campus Subset: On-campus Student Housing: Any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or is located on property that is owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous geographic area that makes up campus.

Non-campus building or property: Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization recognized by the institution; and any building or property (other than a branch campus) owned or controlled by an institution of higher education that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

Public Property: All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that are within the campus, or adjacent to and accessible from a facility owned or controlled by the institution.

Separate Campus: A separate location that the institution owns or controls, is not reasonably geographically contiguous with the main campus, has an organized program of study, and there is at least one person on site acting in an administrative capacity.

Off Campus Trips: If your institution sponsors students on an overnight trip every year and the students stay in the same hotel each year, you must include portions of the hotel in your noncampus geography. What matters is repeated use of a location that is owned or controlled by the institution, not the number of days it is used or whether it is used by the same students or different students.

Short-stay “away” trips: If your institution sponsors short-stay “away” trips of more than one night for its students, all locations used by students during the trip, controlled by the institution during the trip and used to support educational purposes should be treated as noncampus property.

Study abroad programs: If your institution sends students to study abroad at a location or facility that you don’t own or control, you don’t have to include statistics for crimes that occur in those facilities. However, if your institution rents or leases space for your students in a hotel or student housing facility, you are in control of that space for the time period covered by your agreement. Host family situations do not normally qualify as noncampus locations unless your written agreement with the family gives your school some significant control over space in the family home.

Date / Time of Incident

Who Reported This to You?