2018-2019 Participants

Juan Felipe Herrera

Juan Felipe Herrera

Born in California to migrant farmers, Juan Felipe Herrera graduated with a BA from UCLA in 1972 and went on to earn a master’s degree from Stanford in 1980 and an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop in 1990. He has taught at California State University, Fresno and at the University of California, Riverside. He lives in Fresno, California.

Herrera is the author of many collections of poetry, including Notes on the Assemblage (2015); Senegal Taxi (2013); Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems (2008), a recipient of the PEN/Beyond Margins Award; 187 Reasons Mexicanos Can’t Cross The Border: Undocuments 1971–2007 (2007); and Crashboomlove (1999), a novel in verse that received the Americas Award.

From 2015 to 2017, Herrera served as poet laureate of the United States, the first Latino to hold that position. From 2011 to 2016, he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. He has received fellowships and grants from the Breadloaf Writers’ Conference, the California Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Stanford Chicano Fellows Program, and the University of California at Berkeley. In 2015, he received the L.A. Times Book Prize’s Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement.

Donald Revell

Donald Revell

Donald Revell is the author of fifteen collections of poetry, most recently of The English Boat (2018) and Drought-Adapted Vine (2015). Revell has also published six volumes of translations from the French, including Apollinaire’s Alcools, Rimbaud’s A Season in Hell, Laforgue’s Last Verses, and Verlaine’s Songs without Words. His critical writings have been collected in Essay: A Critical Memoir, The Art of Attention, and Invisible Green: Selected Prose.

The recipient of the PEN USA Translation Award and a two-time winner of the PEN USA Award for Poetry, Revell also has won the Academy of American Poets’ Lenore Marshall Prize and is a former Fellow of the Ingram Merrill and Guggenheim Foundations. Additionally, he has twice been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Having previously taught at the Universities of Alabama, Denver, Iowa, Missouri, Tennessee, and Utah, currently serves as Professor of English at UNLV and as a faculty affiliate of the Black Mountain Institute.

Mary Szybist

Mary Szybist

Mary Szybist is most recently the author of Incarnadine (2013), which won the National Book Award for Poetry. Her first collection of poetry, Granted (2003), was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the winner of the 2004 Great Lakes Colleges Association’s New Writers Award.

Szybist is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress. Her work has been awarded two Pushcart Prizes and has been supported by a Lannan Writing residency in Marfa, Texas, and a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Center in Bellagio, Italy.

She has taught at The Iowa Writers Workshop, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers. She lives in Portland Oregon where she is the Morgan S. Odell Professor of Humanities at Lewis & Clark College.

Meg Tyler

Meg Tyler

Meg Tyler is a graduate of Kenyon College and Boston University, where she earned a PhD with a focus on twentieth-century American, British, and Irish poetry. She serves as Associate Professor of Humanities at Boston University, where she also is chair of the Institute for the Study of Irish Culture.

The author of A Singing Contest: Conventions of Sound in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney (2005), Tyler also has written a chapbook of poems, Poor Earth (2014), and been co-editor, with Rosanna Warren, of two anthologies of prison poetry writing, From This Distance (1998) and Springshine (1997). Her research interests are the history of lyric poetry, contemporary poetry, poetry in translation, Irish literature, and the intersections between literature and ethics.

Tyler has previously served as a Fulbright Professor of Anglophone-Irish Literature and Writing at Queen’s University in Belfast, Ireland. In addition, she is the recipient of a Fulbright Teaching/Research Award, for which she served as Visiting Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. She recently received the Peyton Richter Award for Outstanding Interdisciplinary Teaching at Boston University.

Lisa Russ Spaar

Lisa Russ Spaar

Lisa Russ Spaar earned a BA and an MFA from the University of Virginia in 1978 and 1980, respectively. She currently serves as Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. She also has taught at the Palm Beach Poetry Festival, Seattle Pacific University, and the Vermont Studio Center.

Spaar’s most recent collection of poems is Orexia (2017). Her other books of poetry include Vanitas, Rough (2012), Satin Cash (2008), Blue Venus (2004), and Glass Town (1999). She also is the author of the essay collection The Hide-and-Seek Muse: Annotations of Contemporary Poetry (2013) and is the editor of the anthologies Monticello in Mind: Fifty Contemporary Poems on Jefferson (2016), All that Mighty Heart: London Poems (2008), and Acquainted with the Night: Insomnia Poems (1999).

Spaar is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including a Guggenheim fellowship, a Rona Jaffe Award, the Carole Weinstein Poetry Prize, an Outstanding Faculty Award from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, and the Library of Virginia Award for Poetry. She was short-listed for the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award for Excellence in Reviewing.