Seminars For Excellence in Teaching

Since 2008, the Academy for Teaching and Learning has hosted a series of one-hour Seminars for Excellence in Teaching (SET) to help colleagues meet the historic expectations of excellence in teaching at Baylor. For new Teachers of Record (TOR), SET satisfy SACS requirements for professional development in teaching. For more experienced TOR, SET facilitate the sharing of ideas and insights about teaching and learning today and encourage participants to renew their commitments to inspirational teaching. SET are also a valuable resource in the preparation of graduate student Teachers of Record.

All members of the Baylor community are invited to attend SET in accord with our core commitments to seek learning and apply knowledge and to pursue excellence through continuous improvement.



Locations vary. Carefully note the venue for your registered SETs.


Jump to:


What to Continue from Pandemic Teaching

Christopher Richmann (Academy for Teaching & Learning)

Thursday, September 9
2:30-3:30pm
Marrs McLean Science Building, Room GL16
Register

We all learned from pandemic teaching. But what is useful for the long run? This special session will be a collaborative conversation for faculty to organize, brainstorm, and refine reflection on teaching during the pandemic. Faculty will learn from each other the helpful and feasible practices of learning about students, communication, technology, and course design that we learned in the last year and can carry into the future.


A Crash Course in Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Practices

Nicole Kenley (English)
Danielle Williams (English)

Wednesday, September 15
1:30-2:30pm
Marrs McLean Science Building, Room 302
Register

Professors can often feel discouraged when assessing student writing that does not meet their expectations. This SET is designed to help faculty draw upon WAC principles so they are equipped to teach students how to write effectively across the university. In short, this SET is a crash course in Writing Across the Curriculum pedagogy. Faculty participants will learn how assignments such as genre analysis, a multi-stage writing process, and peer review can be adapted to meet the needs of different courses and disciplines and produce stronger student writing. Participants are encouraged to bring a current version of a writing assignment to workshop in small groups.


Teaching at the Edge: Models of Caring for Students without Losing Yourself in the Process

Mike Whitenton (Baylor Interdisciplinary Core)
T.J. Geiger (English)

Monday, September 20
11:00am-12:00pm
Jones Library 200 (Dennis Campbell Innovative Learning Space)
Register

After 18 months of living with a pandemic that brought into stark relief the edge between peril and possibility, how do we respond to the suffering this time has wrought in ways that empower our students without becoming either overwhelmed or numb? This SET will provide concrete and memorable tools you can employ immediately in your interactions with students to help you meet them where they are, while also caring for yourself when needed. Besides their own experiences in the classroom, Geiger and Whitenton will draw heavily upon research on empathy, compassion, self-compassion, empathic distress, trauma-informed care, and more. Attendees will also have the option of participating in these trauma-informed practices during the seminar to help solidify what we have learned together. No experience required, but expect to enjoy yourselves as we open a toolbox for caring for students (and ourselves) during this unprecedented time.


The Value of Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Education

Heather Hudson (Health, Human Performance and Recreation)
Deborah Shirey (Nursing)
Meagan Soltwisch (Nursing)

Wednesday, September 29
3:00-4:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Marrs McLean Science Building, Room 302
Online:

 

Register

Historically, most healthcare education programs focus on teaching students’ specific content which has led to siloed learning and patient care.  A true intentional focus on building interprofessional collaborative skills was not always apparent, valued, or possible. Interprofessional education (IPE) has specific learning competencies that are designed to aid students in learning how to practice collaboratively when credential as a healthcare provider.  Our team explored if students from a FNP and a MAT program perceived interprofessional education skills as valuable.  While this session will introduce and focus on providing information about IPE, anyone from any discipline can benefit from discussing the value of teaching students collaborative skills.  


Tools for Assessing and Disrupting Students’ Beliefs that Inhibit Learning

Shaun Eide (Information Systems)

Tuesday, October 12
11:00a.-12:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Moody Library 104 (Active Learning Lab)
Online: Zoom link will be sent to registrants
Register

Before ever stepping foot into your class, your students have already formed their expectations about your course. These beliefs may or may not be an accurate foreshadowing of the course. Unless disrupted, these initial beliefs will guide students’ interpretation of their experiences throughout the semester. In this SET, we will explore tools and strategies that can be used to effectively assess students’ beliefs. Upon understanding these beliefs, we will explore how to provide experiences to disrupt erroneous beliefs in a constructive manner.


Ungrading: A Conversation about Alternatives to Traditional Assessments and Grades

Michelle Herridge (Academy for Teaching and Learning)

Tuesday, October 19
11:00am-12:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Moody Library 104 (Active Learning Lab)
Online: Zoom link will be sent to registrants
Register

Grading takes place in all of our classrooms and has historically been a "necessary" component of education and learning. This may not be true, and in this seminar, we will discuss what it means to assess students for understanding, what the point of a grade really is, and some alternatives to traditional grading - such as contract grading, standards-based grading, and ungrading. We invite professors from all departments to have a discussion about what a classroom without grades might look like. Participants are encouraged to bring a list of assignments from their course for analysis.


Working with Graduating Students

Amy Ames (Career Services)
Andy Hogue (A&S Dean’s Office)
Dennis Horton (Religion)
Amy Rylander (Career Services)
Julia Daniel (English)

Tuesday, October 26
2:00-3:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Jones Library 200 (Dennis Campbell Innovative Learning Space)
Online: Zoom link will be sent to registrants
Register

As students reach the end of their undergraduate experience, they have particular needs and concerns. Instructors can do many things—in and out of class—to help prepare students for life after college. Join us for a panel discussion with faculty and career services staff exploring professionalization, critical thinking skills, preparation for graduate school, and other distinct considerations for students nearing graduation.


Learning in Love

Elizabeth Corey (Honors College)

Thursday, November 11
3:00-4:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Jones Library 200 (Dennis Campbell Innovative Learning Space)
Online: Zoom link will be sent to registrants
Register

Part of the contemporary problem in making a convincing case for the humanities is that their defenders, despite producing blue-ribbon reports about the current state of education, often do a shockingly bad job of explaining why they are important. The real source of a desire for liberal learning is not and has never been a sense of guilt or obligation, and its reasons cannot be expressed in bureaucratic manifestos. The authentic spring of liberal learning is simple: It is love. This love often originates in an uneasy sense of having missed something important and then -- even as one is unsure of what it is -- in desiring that something.


Reducing Textbook Costs: Paths for Student Success

Jacquelyn Duke (Biology)

Steve Gardner (Economics)

Jodien Johnson (Sociology)

Friady, November 19
3:00-4:00pm
This is a hybrid event.
In-person: Jones Library 200 (Dennis Campbell Innovative Learning Space)
Online: Zoom link will be sent to registrants
Register

Textbook selection is serious business. We look for the textbooks we believe most suitably support the course’s learning objectives, especially if they come with valuable ancillary materials. For many Baylor students, however, the cost of acquiring required textbooks often exceeds their financial means. Far too many start the semester without crucial resources or even go without for the entire class. Fortunately, this economic barrier is not insurmountable. In this seminar, we will hear from a panel of Baylor faculty who have successfully replaced expensive course materials with open textbooks and other zero- to low-cost alternatives.