Ring Events & Resources

FAQs about Sic ’Em Stand Ins

1. What kind of photo is best for the cutout?
2. Will the cutout stay in McLane Stadium all season?
3. If I make multiple gifts and submit a different photo for each member of my family, will they be placed together in the stadium?

Official Baylor Ring FAQs

1. How many completed credit hours do I need to order my Official Baylor Ring?
2. Do all my credit hours have to be Baylor credit hours?
3. How do I order my Official Baylor Ring?
4. I have an Official Baylor Ring Savings Plan. How do I apply those funds when ordering my ring online?
5. What payment options are available?
6. When will I receive my Official Baylor Ring?
7. What if I can't pick up my ring on November 21, or what if Ring Round Up is cancelled due to shelter-in-place mandates?

Virtual Town Hall FAQs

1. What goals and intentional efforts do the Regents and Baylor leadership have to add more diversity in thought, background and ethnicity within their groups and within the faculty and staff at Baylor to better serve a more diverse student body?
2. What are the expected outcomes and deliverables of the Commission, and when can we expect these outcomes?
3. What would seeking repentance and forgiveness for past sins among founders or early leaders look like?
4. What can Baylor do to address the racism students of color face from their peers or others on campus, what does Baylor's reporting & response process look like, and does an outside firm review these cases?
5. As a white Baylor alum, what can I do to support anti-racism within the Baylor family?
6. What programs and resources are available to the Baylor faculty, staff, and students to enhance awareness of cultural diversity and anti-racism?
7. What is the makeup of the commission, are they representative, and do they have decision making authority?
8. How does Baylor plan to address the myriad of recent claims on social media sites of recent incidences of racism on campus by students, faculty, and/or staff?
9. What specific training will faculty and staff have access to that will enhance progress on cultural awareness, implicit bias, and anti-racism?
10. Does Baylor have data to showcase its progress on diversity of students, faculty, and staff as well as outcomes for students of color?
11. Does Baylor allow student protests and if so, how does the University require they be organized. How do they plan to handle an unorganized/non-sanctioned protest?




FAQs about Sic ’Em Stand Ins

1. What kind of photo is best for the cutout?

Sic 'Em Stand Ins use a fan headshot placed into a cutout format. Photos taken from the front that clearly show your face will make the most successful cutout. Please be sure to include space around your head and shoulders. Photos must be submitted at time of order and must be high resolution JPEG format (over 1MB in size). Include only 1 person in each photo and take the photo in front of a plain, white background if at all possible.

By participating in Baylor's Sic 'Em Stand Ins, please keep in mind these things:

  1. You assign Baylor University all rights to use the images for creating a fan cutout and placing it in McLane Stadium, which includes the possibility of appearing in video, photography or other visual productions. You also acknowledge that Baylor University does not guarantee the cutout will be visible to those in the Stadium or via television or any other media.
  2. You acknowledge that Baylor has the right to refuse any photo submitted for a fan cutout for any reason, may alter any photo submitted to make it fit onto the cutout form, and that participants have no right of approval on the cutout.
  3. You represent that you are 18 years old or older and own the rights to any photos you submit on your own behalf or on the behalf of others. Further, you represent that you are the parent or legal guardian of all minors on whose behalf you submit photography and grant rights to Baylor.
  4. You agree to submit photography that contains no commercial advertisements including slogans, websites, or phone numbers, and no images containing political messages, obscene or threatening references.

2. Will the cutout stay in McLane Stadium all season?
Yes, your Sic 'Em Stand In will be used at each home game that remains after you make your gift and upload your photo. To be included in the Stadium, you must complete your transaction one week prior to the home game. Deadlines can be found on the secure ordering site.

3. If I make multiple gifts and submit a different photo for each member of my family, will they be placed together in the stadium?
We will do our best to keep family groups together when placing the cutouts in the stadium, but cannot guarantee that will be possible. Completing all of your transactions in one order will provide the best chance for keeping your group together.

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Official Baylor Ring FAQs

1. How many completed credit hours do I need to order my Official Baylor Ring?
All undergraduates must have 75 completed hours toward their degree to be eligible to purchase a class ring. All graduate students must have 18 completed hours toward their degree to be eligible to purchase an Official Baylor Ring. All hours currently in progress will not be counted toward the total hour count.

2. Do all my credit hours have to be Baylor credit hours?
All hours that count toward your degree - whether earned at Baylor or transferred in - will count toward the 75 completed hours needed to order your ring.

3. How do I order my Official Baylor Ring?

Because of social distancing requirements associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, all ring orders must be placed online this fall. Visit Balfour4Me.com/Baylor to build your Official Baylor Ring! Your ring will be shipped to Baylor to be included in the BeaRing the Night tradition on Friday, November 20, 2020.

4. I have an Official Baylor Ring Savings Plan. How do I apply those funds when ordering my ring online?
On the final payment screen, there will be an option to check a box to apply your ring savings plan. If you do not check this box, your ring savings plan will not be applied to your order.

5. What payment options are available?
In addition to credit card and Pay Pal payment options, Balfour4Me.com/Baylor offers a three-month payment plan to provide more flexibility. To apply a payment plan to your purchase, select the payment plan option on the final payment screen as you complete your online purchase.

6. When will I receive my Official Baylor Ring?

Students - You will be able to pick up your ring at our Official Baylor Ring Round Up event on Saturday, November 21, 2020 (campus location TBA). Our Official Baylor Ring photographer will be onsite to take a photo of you with your ring that will be used during our Virtual Official Baylor Ring Ceremony on December 19, 2020.

Alumni - Your rings will be shipped directly to you. You are welcome to participate in any future Official Baylor Ring Ceremony. Please contact us at OfficialBaylorRing@baylor.edu to coordinate participation in advance.

7. What if I can't pick up my ring on November 21, or what if Ring Round Up is cancelled due to shelter-in-place mandates?
Rings that are not picked up on November 21 will be shipped to you at the address you provided when you placed your order. We ask that you send us a photo of you with your Official Baylor Ring so we may include it in the Virtual Official Baylor Ring Ceremony on December 19, 2020. Send your photos to OfficialBaylorRing@baylor.edu.

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Virtual Town Hall FAQs

1. What goals and intentional efforts do the Regents and Baylor leadership have to add more diversity in thought, background and ethnicity within their groups and within the faculty and staff at Baylor to better serve a more diverse student body?

The size of the 2020-2021 Baylor Board of Regents stands at 34 Regents. Five of the seven new Regents are female, as is 44% of the entire Board. Six Regents, representing 18% of the Board, have diverse ethnic backgrounds, up from one just four years ago. This is the result of a focused effort on governance changes adopted in February 2017 in which the Board made diversity a stated priority in selecting future Regents, with an emphasis on increasing racial and ethnic diversity, as well as bringing in accomplished people of various professional backgrounds from the arts, sciences, technology, communications and higher education. The Board of Regents is comprised a group of dedicated volunteers who all have in common a genuine love and care for Baylor and bring to the Board a variety of backgrounds, ideas and perspectives to their service on the Board.

President Livingstone has recognized the need to coordinate and institutionalize the important work and continued conversations related to race and injustices, as well as include diverse backgrounds and viewpoints within the president's senior leadership team. On June 18, Malcolm Foley was appointed as special advisor to the president for equity and campus engagement and as a member of the President's Council. Serving in a joint role as director of the Black church studies program at Baylor's Truett Seminary, Foley will facilitate engagement and interaction with and among the many diverse members of the Baylor campus community and work collaboratively to develop initiatives designed to foster a welcoming and inclusive campus for all. Foley previously served as a Student Regent for Baylor and is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Religion studying the history of Christianity. He also serves as a member of the Commission on Historic Campus Representations.

Baylor continues to make progress in the recruitment and retention of faculty of color:

  • This past year, Baylor's faculty of color stood at 16.6%. For comparison, a decade ago our faculty diversity percentage was at 12%.
  • Since 2015, Baylor has increased its African-American/Black faculty by 85% (91% if include multiracial African-American/Black faculty), Hispanic faculty by 60%, and Asian faculty by 33%.

In terms of recent major initiatives:

  • Launched the Faculty Recruiting Enhancement Grant program supporting academic departments that propose innovative and creative search techniques demonstrating active recruiting strategies and interdisciplinary conceptions of faculty roles. This program encourages higher levels of creativity than traditional searches utilize and avoids artificial barriers to finding future faculty for Baylor University.
  • Instituted required diversity training beginning in fall 2020 for all current students, faculty and staff on an annual basis. The University already requires diversity training for incoming students as well as for new faculty and staff - in addition to faculty search committees and student leadership - but this training now will occur on an annual basis for all current students, faculty and staff.
  • Created a virtual Baylor Conversation Series this summer on Christians' responsibilities - especially at a Christian university with a community called to offer the grace and peace of Christ to all of God's people - to elevate conversations on race, peacemaking and racial conciliation. President Livingstone and a panel of distinguished Baylor faculty held their first discussion June 24 and follow-up discussion on July 8, with the video of both sessions available online on the President's website. Additional events are being planned for the fall.
  • Created the Trailblazer Scholars Program, a scholarship program designed to recognize the importance of fostering diversity and mutual respect at Baylor. The University committed $5 million to launch the program, with additional fundraising efforts to follow. The program is anticipated to serve a cohort of 80 students through scholarship support once fully launched.

2. What are the expected outcomes and deliverables of the Commission, and when can we expect these outcomes?

The Commission was established in response to a June 26, 2020, Board resolution openly acknowledging and recognizing the University's historic connections to slavery from its chartering on Feb. 1, 1845, and during its first decades of operation as an institution of higher education.

Through the following specific charges, the Commission will develop of a set of observations for consideration by the Board of Regents and Administration about how to best communicate and reflect the complete history of Baylor University for current and future generations.

Specifically, the Commission will:

  • Review the complete historical record and context of the University and its founders and early leaders, including historical connections to slavery and racial injustice.
  • Propose a plan for documenting and communicating the complete history of Baylor and its founders and early leaders, including historical connections to slavery and racial injustice.
  • Evaluate all statues, monuments, buildings and other aspects of campus within this complete historical context and in reference to the original intentions behind their physical location, placement and naming and provide observations for consideration.
  • Prepare a final report to be provided to the Board of Regents and the President no later than Dec. 20, 2020.

It is anticipated that the Commission co-chairs will provide a status report to the Baylor Family in late October.

As a University, it is part of our obligation to understand Baylor's history and its connection to our present. Board Chair Mark Rountree and the President have been clear that the Commission is not charged with changing Baylor's history. Changing the name of Baylor University is not part of the process. This effort is focused on telling the complete history of Baylor.

3. What would seeking repentance and forgiveness for past sins among founders or early leaders look like?

First and foremost, will be to gain a complete understanding of Baylor's history and then determining ways in which it can be shared and communicated both within and outside the Baylor Family. We intend to allow the Commission on Historic Campus Representations to complete its work and deliver a final report before determining next steps regarding Baylor's historic past.

4. What can Baylor do to address the racism students of color face from their peers or others on campus, what does Baylor's reporting & response process look like, and does an outside firm review these cases?

Baylor is committed to treating all students, faculty and staff with respect and dignity, promoting equal opportunities and prohibiting discriminatory practices, including unlawful discrimination. Any issue or incident that violates the University's Civil Rights policy or other policies must be reported through the Report It website at www.baylor.edu/reportit or in conjunction with Baylor's Equity Office.

Established in 2018 the Equity Office supports Baylor University's goal of becoming an inclusive and equitable campus. The Equity Office provides an equitable environment for students, faculty, and staff and works to achieve this with compassion, understanding, and fairness to all parties involved. The Equity Office handles matters concerning equal opportunity, affirmative action, civil rights, and related training. Searches are underway - even in the midst of a University-wide hiring freeze - to ensure that the Equity Office is fully staffed. With these searches continued, external experts have been engaged to ensure all incidents are investigated and remain on retainer as part of the Equity Office's day-to-day operations.

Click here for reporting information.

Baylor University Personnel Policies regarding equity and civil rights:

Complaints may be initiated through the following options:

5. As a white Baylor alum, what can I do to support anti-racism within the Baylor family?

First and foremost, we are all part of the Baylor Family and part of the beautiful mosaic of God's creation. As Christians, we are called to love and respect. Recognizing one another as created in the image of God requires treating each other with great dignity. As a University, we have pledged to tackle these difficult conversations regarding race and social justice backed by actionable steps.

You can learn from, engage and support Black and Latinx alumni groups, such as the Baylor Black Alumni Alliance and Baylor Alumni Latino Group, which host events and conversations bringing together diverse alumni.

Participate in upcoming Baylor Conversation Series events online and watch past conversations with President Livingstone and a panel of distinguished Baylor faculty guests, Dr. Mia Moody-Ramirez, Dr. Greg Garrett and Malcom Foley:

In addition, if you missed the Virtual Town Hall on July 13, 2020, hosted by the Baylor Black Alumni Alliance and Baylor Alumni Latino Group, the conversation is available in the video above on this webpage. Moderated by Mia Moody-Ramirez, Ph.D. (MS '98, MA '01), professor and chair of Journalism, Public Relations and New Media, the discussion featured panelists:

  • U.S. Congressman Colin Allred (BA '05)
  • Linda A. Livingstone, Ph.D., President, Baylor University
  • René Maciel (MS '91), Baylor Board of Regents and Missions Pastor, First Baptist Woodway
  • Michael McFarland, Ph.D. (BBA '93, EdD '05), Baylor Board of Regents and Superintendent, Crowley ISD
  • During the conversation, President Livingstone announced the launch of the Trailblazer Scholars Program at Baylor, a new initiative that acknowledges the need to live out the University's commitment to a vibrant, diverse campus community and is a tangible step to support our students of color and the significant contributions they make to the Baylor Family. Alumni can help support Baylor's students by making a gift to Trailblazer Scholarships, as well as support other student scholarships such as the Dr. Vivienne Malone-Mayes Baylor Black Alumni Club Endowed Scholarship Fund or the Latino Alumni Group Scholarship Fund.

    6. What programs and resources are available to the Baylor faculty, staff, and students to enhance awareness of cultural diversity and anti-racism?

    • Required diversity training for all current students, faculty and staff, which we plan to roll out this fall. The University already requires diversity training for incoming students as well as for new faculty and staff - in addition to faculty search committees and student leadership - but this training now will occur on an annual basis for all current students, faculty and staff. To make this online training effective, we will leverage the continual training offered by our Equity Office and other groups that occurs throughout the academic year.
    • Racial Equity Institute: Numerous members of Baylor's campus leadership team have had the opportunity to participate alongside other Waco leaders in sessions provided by the Racial Equity Institute, which helps organizations and communities grow their understanding and analysis of structural racism and its cultural and historic roots. Additionally, plans are in progress to host several REI Groundwater sessions this fall for the President's Council, deans and other campus leaders throughout the University.
    • Classrooms: Students are learning more about diversity in campus-wide events, courses and organizations. As part of the revised core curriculum in the College of Arts & Sciences, Baylor faculty are encouraged to choose texts, lecture materials and projects to discuss and help students understand the intersections of race, gender, religion, class and culture.
    • List of Faculty/Staff and Student Equity Resources: including community resources, affinity groups on campus, student resources and campus organizations.
    • Robust campus programming throughout the academic year that celebrates the diversity of the Baylor Family and provides learning opportunities regarding different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. Major educational campaigns are centered around Martin Luther King Day, Black History Month, Hispanic Heritage Month and Asian-Pacific Heritage Month.
    • Baylor Multicultural Affairs' list of suggested Anti-Racism Resources: including books, movies and podcasts
    • Baylor Conversation Series: In this online series, President Livingstone and a panel of distinguished Baylor faculty guests, Dr. Mia Moody-Ramirez, Dr. Greg Garrett and Malcom Foley, explore how, as a Christian university with a community called to offer the grace and peace of Christ to all of God's people, we should lean into the current events, build upon our actions to date and elevate the difficult, uncomfortable but important conversations - with actionable steps - regarding race, privilege, violence and conciliation in America.

    7. What is the makeup of the commission, are they representative, and do they have decision making authority?

    The 26 appointed members of the Commission on Historic Campus Representations include voices from across the University, including students, faculty, staff and alumni. The ethnic/racial breakdown of the Commission is:

    • 14 Black members
    • 2 Hispanic members
    • 1 Asian member
    • 9 white members

    The Commission on Historic Campus Representations is co-chaired by the following, with Baylor University degrees indicated:

    • Alicia D.H. Monroe, M.D., Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Baylor College of Medicine, and member, Baylor Board of Regents
    • Gary Mortenson, D.M.A., Professor and Dean, Baylor University School of Music
    • Walter Abercrombie (B.S. '82, M.S.Ed. '92), Associate Athletics Director for Baylor "B" Association

    Members of the Commission, who represent students, faculty, staff and alumni, include:

    • Katie Adair (Doctoral Candidate), President, Graduate Student Association
    • Joel Allison (B.A. '70), retired President and CEO, Baylor Scott & White Health, and former Chair, Baylor Board of Regents
    • Jayson Baldridge, Senior, Student-Athlete, Track & Field
    • Lexy Bogney, Junior, Secretary and Community Coordination Chair, Baylor NAACP
    • Michael A. Evans Sr. (D.Min. '09), Senior Pastor, Bethlehem Baptist Church, Mansfield, Texas; member, Baylor Board of Regents; and President, Baptist General Convention of Texas
    • Malcolm Foley (Ph.D. Candidate), Special Advisor to the President for Equity and Campus Engagement
    • Cheryl Gochis (B.A. '91, M.A. '94), Vice President, Human Resources/Chief Human Resources Officer
    • Dominque Hill, Director of Wellness and Past-President, Black Faculty and Staff Association
    • Sutton Houser, Senior, Student Body President
    • Trent Hughes (B.A. '98), Vice President of Sales, Curazene, and Vice President, Baylor Alumni Board of Advocates
    • Sher Isada, Junior, University Scholar, and Student Regent
    • Alan Lefever (B.A. '84), Director, Texas Baptist Historical Collection, and member, Baylor Alumni Board of Advocates
    • Sandra Lené, Associate Vice President, Operations and Financial Services, Advancement
    • Mark Lovvorn (B.B.A. '76, B.Acc. '77), Chairman and CEO Providence Bancshares Corp., Dallas, Texas, and member, Baylor Board of Regents
    • Michael McFarland (B.B.A. '93, Ed.D. '05), Superintendent of Schools, Crowley Independent School District, and member, Baylor Board of Regents
    • Bill Neilson, M.D. (B.A. '76), retired Associate Dean, Honors College and Clinical Professor, Medical Humanities
    • Michael Parrish, Ph.D. (B.A. '74, M.A. '76), Linden G. Bowers Professor of American History
    • Coretta Pittman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English and Chair-Elect, Faculty Senate
    • Mia Moody-Ramirez, Ph.D. (M.S.Ed. '98, M.A. '01), Professor and Chair, Journalism, Public Relations and New Media
    • Marcus Sedberry, Senior Associate Athletics Director for Student-Athlete Development
    • Tyrha Lindsey-Warren, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Marketing
    • Doug Weaver, Ph.D., Professor of Religion, Undergraduate Program Director and Director of Church-State Studies
    • Mya Ellington-Williams, Senior, member, Black Student Union

    Ex-Officio Commission Members

  • Kristy Orr (J.D. '03), Baylor University Board Professional
  • Todd Copeland, Ph.D. (B.A. '90), Director, Advancement Marketing
  • Karen Kemp (B.B.A. '84, M.B.A. '85), Associate Vice President, University Marketing and Brand Strategy

The Commission is an advisory committee charged with developing a set of observations for consideration by the Board of Regents and Administration about how to best communicate and reflect the complete history of Baylor University for current and future generations.

Specifically, the Commission will:

  1. Review the complete historical record and context of the University and its founders and early leaders, including historical connections to slavery and racial injustice.
  2. Propose a plan for documenting and communicating the complete history of Baylor and its founders and early leaders, including historical connections to slavery and racial injustice.
  3. Evaluate all statues, monuments, buildings and other aspects of campus within this complete historical context and in reference to the original intentions behind their physical location, placement and naming and provide observations for consideration.
  4. Prepare a final report to be provided to the Board of Regents and the President no later than Dec. 20, 2020.

8. How does Baylor plan to address the myriad of recent claims on social media sites of recent incidences of racism on campus by students, faculty, and/or staff?

President Livingstone recently posted the following response to the @DearBaylor Instagram, where many of these difficult stories have been shared by members of the Baylor Family:

"I have read every single one of the heartbreaking stories posted @DearBaylor, reflecting incidents of racism at Baylor that date back many years. These stories cut against the core of who we ought to be as Christians and the caring community for which Baylor strives to be.

"As Christians, we are called to love and respect. Recognizing one another as created in the image of God requires treating each other with great dignity, and @DearBaylor gives us sobering examples of our family being denied that dignity.

"As a University, we have pledged to tackle these difficult conversations regarding race and social justice backed by actionable steps, beginning with the immediate actions shared earlier in June. In addition to @DearBaylor, we have heard from the Baylor Chapter of the NAACP, the Black Student Coalition, the LatinX Coalition and Coalition of Asian Students. We plan to communicate further plans with the campus community next Wednesday, August 19, prior to the start of the fall semester.

"We appreciate the many contributions of our students, faculty, staff and alumni of color. You are an important part of the Baylor Family."

The University takes all allegations of this nature seriously and reviews and investigates claims made to the University through its reporting systems, including www.baylor.edu/reportit. Baylor is committed to maintaining an environment in which all students and employees are treated with respect and dignity, equal opportunities are promoted, and discriminatory practices, including unlawful discrimination are prohibited. The Equity Office handles matters concerning equal opportunity, affirmative action, and civil rights.

Baylor University Personnel Policies regarding equity and civil rights:

Complaints may be initiated through the following options:

9. What specific training will faculty and staff have access to that will enhance progress on cultural awareness, implicit bias, and anti-racism?

  • Required diversity training for all current students, faculty and staff, which we plan to roll out this fall. The University already requires diversity training for incoming students as well as for new faculty and staff - in addition to faculty search committees and student leadership - but this training now will occur on an annual basis for all current students, faculty and staff. To make this online training effective, we will leverage the continual training offered by our Equity Office and other groups that occurs throughout the academic year.
  • Racial Equity Institute: Numerous members of Baylor's campus leadership team have had the opportunity to participate alongside other Waco leaders in sessions provided by the Racial Equity Institute, which helps organizations and communities grow their understanding and analysis of structural racism and its cultural and historic roots. Additionally, plans are in progress to host several REI Groundwater sessions this fall for the President's Council, deans and other campus leaders throughout the University.
  • Regular programs offered through the Equity Office: In our commitment to continuously educate our campus community on topics of equal opportunity, discrimination, affirmative action and federal and state mandated requirements, the Equity Office offers various trainings and workshops throughout the academic year. Current Trainings Offered (registration available in the Ignite LEARN module):
    • Inclusion & Diversity 101: Building an Inclusive Workplace Community: Authenticity. Awareness. Appreciation.
    • If You're Breathing, You're Biased
    • RACE: Reconciling a Culture of InEquities

10. Does Baylor have data to showcase its progress on diversity of students, faculty, and staff as well as outcomes for students of color?

Since 2002, the overall racial and ethnic diversity of our faculty has grown from 6.4% to 16.5%. Since 2015, Baylor has increased its African-American/Black faculty by 85% (91% if include multiracial African-American/Black faculty), Hispanic faculty by 60%, and Asian faculty by 33%.

Once hired, the University provides vital support to retain these faculty scholars and help them reach their aspirations as members of our outstanding faculty. We believe representation matters, and we understand we have much more progress to make. The bottom line is we are committed to building a faculty that also reflects our diverse student body.

In terms of students, 36.9% (or 6,653) of Baylor's 18,033 students identified themselves as part of an ethnic minority group for the Fall 2019 semester (data for Fall 2020 will not be available until after the 12th class day). For Fall 2019, student enrollment was as follows:

African American/Black: 1,161
Alaskan Native/Amer. Indian: 75
Asian: 1,849
Hispanic: 2,744
Pacific Islander: 16
White: 11,060
Multiracial: 808
Not Specified/Unknown: 320
Total: 18,033

Five years ago (2015), Baylor's minority student percentage stood at 34.4% (5,772 students), while 10 years ago (2010) the number was 32.0% (4,769 students).

11. Does Baylor allow student protests and if so, how does the University require they be organized. How do they plan to handle an unorganized/non-sanctioned protest?

Baylor University and its Department of Student Activities values open dialogue and the exchange of ideas in a manner that is consistent with the University's mission for the purposes of education. Within this context, a recognized student organization may engage in expressive activity as long as the activity maintains the dignity of and is consistent with the mission of the University and does not infringe on the rights of others.

Student Activities' Expressive Events process and expectations are outlined on p. 27 of the Student Organization Policies and Procedures Guide. The University's policy on demonstrations is available online here. Note that modifications for the policy are currently underway that include encouraging expressive activities to be planned outdoors with social distancing guidelines in mind and the University’s face covering requirement to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Additionally, any recognized student organization planning to engage in expressive activity must adhere to the spirit of these expectations:

  • Student organization expressive activity must be registered with the Department of Student Activities through the online Event Registration form within the Connect system 24 hours in advance and follow all guidelines as requested by Student Activities in the event approval notice. The Director of Student Activities, or his/her designee, will serve to coordinate university resources to support the event in accordance with university protocol.
  • Only members of the Baylor University community may organize, lead, or participate in expressive activity on campus; therefore, students, faculty members, and staff are encouraged to have their Baylor University ID card in their possession to verify their ability to participate.
  • Activities must not violate local, state, or federal laws, or university policy and activities must not disrupt Baylor University functions or impede access to or use of campus facilities. Similarly, chanting or sustained, repeated noise which substantially interferes with communication during a planned activity is not permitted.
  • Participants may not employ amplified sound in their activities in order to avoid significant disruption of university functions.
  • Participants are prohibited from using open flames/torches.
  • Signage, leaflets, or other distributable or displayable materials will be reviewed prior to expressive activity for approval. Signage should be constructed of soft materials such as cardboard or cloth and should not be attached to rigid sticks or poles.
  • The University reserves the right to control time, place, message, and manner of the expressive activity.
  • Commercial activity is outside the scope of expressive activity and must adhere to established solicitation policies.
  • The Department of Student Activities and/or designated university personnel may intervene as appropriate for violations through expressive activity.

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Give Light is a $1.1 billion comprehensive campaign for the future of Baylor University. The campaign undergirds Illuminate, the University's Academic Strategic Plan, and will impact every aspect of campus life, from academics and athletics to student life and global engagement.