Workshops

Abdul Omari

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 316)

“Would you follow you?”

This workshop gives leaders the opportunity to focus on followers and how they, as leaders, can better provide for their followers using the “4 basic needs of a follower” and “identifying each person’s one big thing.” Using the 4 basic needs of a follower – trust, hope, compassion, and stability – coupled with “each person’s one big thing” participants explore where there are roadblocks to providing the 4 basic needs.

 

Stories That Transcend Generations (Panel)

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 143)

Join a Coffeehouse Chat featuring a panelist of matured couples vested in a legacy of service. Life is journey of service for each couple. Each couple’s day and year are scheduled of Intentional service actions that link the now with virtues, principles, strategies and tools of living that will foster an enriched journey during the good, the challenged and the most difficult periods. Participants will walk away inspired to overcome any doubt or uncertainty that will limit a celebration of life in its fullest.

 

Advisor Workshop

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 316)

 

Aletor Cole & Kristian Singh

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 124)

“Life After College”

This workshop is aimed at giving students the necessary resources to make a smooth transition from undergrad to life after college by equipping them with financial planning, ways to navigate through corporate America and how to network between social and business settings.

 
Archie Nettles

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 117)

“Just Keep Talking: Improving Your Public Skills One Conversation at a Time.”

Public speaking is considered to be one of the greatest fears for most individuals.

This workshop seeks to educate students on how to improve their public speaking skills and understand what causes fear, anxiety, and nervousness. Students will be able to apply what they have learned during the workshop by having the opportunity to do impromptu speeches.

 
Barbara Kufiadan & Alexis Baker

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 126)

“Socially Conscious Leadership”

In this workshop, we will be discussing the significance of being socially conscious while in positions of leadership. In our time together we will bring attention to different styles of activism. We will also discuss the ways in which current events affect us in our leadership roles and as students. Next, we will talk about types of self-care that you can engage in after experiencing race based trauma. Most importantly, we will give you advice on ways you can be resilient after times of racial trauma.

 

Saturday: 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 126)

“Give Me Your Black Card!!”


This is something every black person has heard or maybe even said. The idea
of a black card suggest that blackness is monolithic, and if you do not react, say or
act a certain way you are in jeopardy of getting your blackness taken away. In this
workshop, we will be discussing the idea of a black card, and where its roots lie.
Take a Black Card quiz that measures “blackness” and share your results!

 
Brittney Wardlaw

Saturday: 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 117)

"Title IX & Civil Rights: What’s the Big Deal About Title IX and are We Ever Going to Talk About Anything Else?"


The historical context on the timeline of Title IX—the well-known Education Amendment from its birth in 1972, until today.  We will walk through a brief history of how Title IX came to be so important and the messages communicated by both the government, as well as institutions of higher education.  There will also be time spent discussing some of the Civil Rights implication in higher education and the rights and opportunities afforded students today.  Participants will be given the opportunity to discuss what an institution can do to make all people, issues, and concerns feel supported at their institutions.

 
Bryant K. Smith

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

Marrs McLean Science Bldg (Room 303)

"The Manhood/Womanhood Test"


It's not enough to say that you are a man or a woman unless you are clear about the type of man and woman you are. Answering the seven questions in the manhood/womanhood test is the best way to find out who you are as well as what you bring to the table personally and professionally. This interactive and engaging workshop will help you see if you are ready to be a student, mate, employee or employer by helping you become a good man or woman. Attendees will be separated by gender and asked to answer the seven core questions of the manhood/womanhood test. The answers will provide the basis for examining the 5 case studies throughout the remainder of the workshop. The facilitator will use the answers given during the discussion phase to introduce critical thinking, personal development, student development and gender theories into the workshop. The workshop will end with the 10 indisputable truths of manhood and womanhood.

 

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 118)

“Love and Lead Black”

This is an interactive workshop on what it means to be a Black Student Leader.  It will challenge attendees to understand the power and responsibility they have as Black student leaders, help them understand what it means to advocate on behalf of the Black community, promote Black ideologies, practice Black love, and matriculate as a Black student. Attendees will take the "Hip Hop Leadership Inventory" which will give them their leadership style and help them identify strengths and weaknesses of each of the four styles.  This workshop is interactive, engaging and will leave each attendee with at least ten immediately actionable things they can do to improve themselves as Black student leaders. It will also provide attendees with theoretical, anecdotal and historical examples as a basis for loving themselves as Black people, working on behalf of Black people and taking care of themselves as Black people."

 

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 332)

"Open Forum"
 

CJ Pulliam

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 141)

“Back to Baesics!”

A fun and interactive workshop meant to get people talking about relationships! Are you dating or just talking? Have you ever been courted? Do you want to be? Should you even be sweating him? What’s the best way to deal with a friends with benefits situation? and we have barely scratched the surface! Come ready to keep it 8 more than 92 with ya boy and i'll do no less as we uncover what's up? Are you a bae, a boo, or a bestie? Find out at Back 2 Baesics!!

 
Crystal Oji

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

SUB (White Room)

“Mental Health Matters”

Oftentimes, the state of one’s own mental health is overlooked due to the lack of education on mental illnesses/ Mental health or because of the stigma society has placed on individuals with mental illness. In this workshop, I want to discuss the importance of mental health, the application of healthy coping skills and self-care to help alleviate the daily stressors we experience in life. In hopes to end the stigma that attaches shame to reaching out for help, I hope to encourage self reflection and honesty with self about the work that needs to be done to reach optimal mental health.

 
Davia Roberts

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 228)

“Silenced Stories”


Join this workshop to discuss ways to address mental health without fear or awkwardness. Discuss stigma in the Black community and how to identify warning signs for your friends and fellow students who are high achievers and appear to be the epitome of Black Excellence. This workshop is a reminder that Black Excellence is not free from mental illness. You can be successful and have a mental illness... but you don't have to deal with it alone.

 
Ebony Hall & Shelly Conboy-Brown

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm, 2:30-3:20 pm

Marrs McLean Science Bldg 302

"The Waking Process: #WakeUp #BeWoke #StayWoke"


Being #woke is being culturally competent. It is a process. In efforts to #wakeup one must increase self-awareness and avoid personal biases. In other words, one must realize they have been sleep for one to #bewoke and #StayWoke. Being woke is a conduit of addressing the detrimental impact of biased interactions. If future generations seek to expand their cultural competency, the awareness of self becomes critical. This workshop helps future leaders incorporate approaches, with a specific focus on ethnic consciousness and identity, as part of a culturally competent framework. Presenters will equip the audience with a necessary, yet rudimentary level of cultural competency that focuses primarily on diversity awareness.

 
Eddie Francis

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

Marrs McLean Science Bldg (Room GL60)

“Lectures to Livelihood”

Eddie Francis is a talent acquisition professional with a global award-winning recruitment firm and has worked with over 200 hiring managers in several industries. He now shares his experiences as the career segment contributor to the “Sunday Journal” talk show on WYLD-FM radio; and serves as a hiring expert for Jobipedia.org. Eddie also publishes the blog “Lectures to Livelihood” for college students and recent college graduates.

 
Egypt aka Devin T. Robinson

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm, 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Houston Room)

“Recreating Black Wall Street”

Filmmaker and author, Devin T. Robinson X “Egypt” takes audiences on a journey through history to define not only the “What happened” of Black Wall Street but the “How to” of Black Wall Street. Attendees will watch two thrilling new films he’s written and produced about Black Wall Street and using what he calls, “basic and simple” actions to build collective Black wealth, there will be an interactive discussion about his findings.

 
Erin Gaddis

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm

SUB (Fentress Room)

"Black Enough: Unity in the Black Community"

 
Froswa’ Booker-Drew

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 332)

"12 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started Leading Others"

As a leader, there are always things you wish someone had told you before you started to ascend the career ladder. In this workshop, discover tips from the experiences of Dr. Froswa' Booker-Drew that can help you become a more effective leader in both your professional and personal life.

 
Herb and Kennisha Moffett

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (White Room)

"Making Relationships Work: What's Your Story"


This workshop will bless conference attendees with the wisdom necessary to build lifelong relationships through the power of understanding one's own story.  This workshop excites us, tremendously, because our great relationship story began while we were students at Baylor University!

 
Janecia Love

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 107)

"Black Girl Magic"


Being a black girl can be hard enough with the pressures to be perfect everyday with sources such as social media, television and what society may suggest. But what about the pressures and stereotypes we might face in the work field? We’ve always been taught that we’ll always have to work twice as hard no matter what industry were in but what about balancing your personal image, emotions, workload, relationships on top of keeping it all together? Seems impossible right? With a little bit of faith and determination there’s nothing you can’t conquer. That’s what black girl magic is all about right ;)

 
Jasmine Pulce

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 302)

"LGBTQIA Inclusion in Black Student Affinity Groups"


Oftentimes, queer and trans students of color feel as though they can’t bring their “whole selves” to racialized spaces, i.e. Black affinity group meetings. More specifically, Black queer and trans students feel as though the Black community doesn’t accept them or understand them. To that end, as leaders of Black affinity groups, it is imperative that you create spaces in which all Black students feel welcome. In this workshop, participants will gain knowledge about the experiences of and identities within the LGBTQIA community.
Through an interactive lecture and activity, participants will also learn best practices for LGBTQIA inclusion in Black affinity groups.

 
Jay Todd

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am, 2:00-2:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 203)

"The Black P.T.S.D: Multiple Meanings Making Mental Health Matter" parts 1 and 2

There are a great deal of things that affect us mentally as black young adults, but they do not define us. There are multiple variables that have a direct impact on us from, how society is, or things that may have been passed down from generationally. This is about growth & self-reflection with the use of positive psychology/energy. This workshop is not for the weak hearted. This is not only to help us focus more on our mental health, but to help us grow while feeling and thinking better.

 
Jaylon Thomas & Kalen Russell

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 141)

"Black and Blue: Moving Forward"

With the increase of social justice street protests in the United States, Black students are being placed in situations of uncertainty which they are not fully equiped to navigate; therefore, many endure unnecessary harassment or harm at the hands of law enforcement. In our workshop, "Black and Blue: Moving Forward", students will participate in a focus group where they will be tasked with creating counter-
narratives that will aid them in finding ways to express their feelings about law enforcement, deconstruct the social norms of modern policing, examine their social responses to perceived police bias and create effective coping mechanisms through expression in hopes of validating their experiences.

 
Jemia Young

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 429)

"Ladies, Now Let's Get in Formation"

Women leaders bring their whole selves to their careers. We are complex individuals, and that's what positions women for leadership. However there is a confidence gap when it comes to men versus women. Why are we not practicing the bravery men do in the workplace?

 
Jerica Wortham

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Foster 302

"Artists: Stay Hungry, But Don’t Starve!"

Are you a creative that has stopped creating? Do you want to move from “starving artist” to walking
abundantly in your God given talents? Do you have a desire to find a way to monetize your gifts to be
both purposeful and profitable. Join me as I introduce the S.P.E.A.K. Method to propel you from dreaming to DOING.
Nothing is action but action.

 
Johnny “Slin-K” Brownlee

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Beckham Room)

"It's a Conference Not a Carnival"

Is a spinoff of the Book and workshop Getting In Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations. We seek to reverse this trend and thought process of administration not seeing the value of conferences and students not focusing on the right aspects of conference, by teaching students to treat conference as a business trip; teaching them how to masterfully work the conference so that they focus on the right
things, develop and can be trusted and encouraged to go to conferences. As students attending a conference is a privilege, not a birthright.

 

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 318)

"Getting in Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations"

Across the nation, our student organizations are struggling and student governments are struggling. Many seem to be on their last leg, past their prime, etc. Organizations don’t have the activism and sacrifice of students from the 60’s and 70’s, drive of the 80’s, the urgency of the 90’s or money and participation of organizations from the early 2000’s. We seek to see if it’s a generational issue, leadership issue or are other factors the problem. We examine 6 sinister problems that are costing student organizations funding, stability, sustainability, etc. We’re often taught how to be good leaders, but never how to run good organizations, revive them or save them from peril.

 

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 318)

"Breaking the Chains, Death to Willie Lynch"

Is part 1 of a 3 part lecture series, a black history / black awareness workshop, that
takes a strong look at the history that slavery and colonialism had and currently has on the lives of Africans, African Americans, Caribbean’s and Latinos. We look at all of the obstacles to our Unity, Progress, and Prosperity both home and abroad. We read and dissect, both the original letter and the new and largely unheard of New Willie Lynch Letter, to find answers to how we can solve our own problems within our community and countries of origin. Even though the Letter has been called a hoax, there is no denying the truth that can be found in it, and it being a possible hoax, has not stopped racist organizations from teaching and carrying out the mission of the letter.

 
Justice Davis & Justine Floyd

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Cowden Room)

"Interviewing: Secure the Bag"

Secure the bag alert!!!  We all want the bag, but how do we get it? Looking for an internship or full-time employment?  Let Hormel Foods give you some major keys. Bring a current resume and join us as we drop knowledge on how to put your
best foot forward when interviewing. “Stay focused and secure your bag because they want you to fail and they don’t want us
to win.” – DJ Khaled

 

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm, 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Cowden Room)

"Color Brave: Professionally Unapologetic"

Have you ever asked yourself what it would be like to be “WOKE” and unapologetic in the workplace? Do you fear the idea of having to assimilate into popular culture as you
transition from college into the “real world?” If the answer is yes, then this workshop is for you. As young Black employees working in corporate, we know what it is like to challenge the rhetoric of a diverse workplace and understand what a true inclusive culture looks like. From “don’t touch my hair” to “E-bonics”, we will discuss topics that will have you at the edge of your seat. If you are interested in job opportunities, bring
your resume!

 
Kerry Burkley

Saturday: 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 226)

“Engaging Our World beyond Trauma”

This presentation will elaborate on the condition of crimes against persons and children.  Attendees will learn about investigative systems engaging crime victimized families and consider ways to form collaborations with professionals to help strengthen community towards healing and justice.

 
Kiah Chism

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 329)

"Stop Begging: A Means To True Empowerment"


Until Black people learn to stop begging, there will never be a revolution worth televising. This workshop will empower it’s attendees to let go of blame while recognizing systematic traumas, create new mental pathways to succeed, and skills that’ll help them walk in their calling within the next 24 hours.

 
Kima Russell

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 102)

"Who Am I?"

Who we are is everything; the definition of that can be greatly determined by gender, socio-economic status, religion, and many other life experiential factors. The question is, do we have to remain who we are? This takes a serious desire, and ability, to examine one’s self and explore the depths of this. My goal is to, through my life experiences and the way I express those experiences through art, help people find their true self.

 
Kriskumar Singh

Friday: 1:25-2:15pm

SUB (Beckham Room)

"For Allies: Being An Ally in Black Spaces"

I would like to facilitate this space for allies to better ourselves and each other. Of course this workshop is open to everyone, however the focus is on allyship, therefore a majority of the conversation will be geared toward this identity.
Topics will include 1) discussing allyship as a journey and not a destination, 2) understanding the concept of Time-Place-Manner, and 3) leaving the stories but taking the knowledge away from the workshop.

 
Lauren Whiteman & Stevie Johnson

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 332)

"Rhymes and Reason Presents: The #LiberationTape"

a hip-hop discussion that focuses on the lived experiences of Black college students.  Students in the session will create a music playlist that encapsulates how they have or will liberate themselves from institutional, social, racial and economic demands of college, while discussing how to use their lived experiences to help bring about liberation on their campuses and in their communities.

 
Malcolm London

Saturday: 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 124)

“Artivism”

The arts are a powerful tool in leading and inspiring youth culture toward social activism. With extensive experience educating and amplifying the voices of Chicago’s youth, Malcolm London’s work began in the role of the student through the youth poetry scene and has evolved into that of an educator. This interactive session and spoken-word performance will share insights into how the intersections of race, class, and gender have informed his work spanning community arts organizations and social movements. Come join the artist, educator, and activist as he performs original poetry, music and facilitates a conversation on how one can use their talents as a catalyst for social change.

 
Mark A. Christie

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 331)

"Kingdompreneurship"


This workshop will be a discussion about how to make money by making meaning. We will explore discovering the enterprise that’s already inside of you. We will identify the essential systems for any successful enterprise. Then we will reveal the areas of opportunity for this generation “a unique asset allocation model”.

 
Natalie Felton

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (White Room)

"Black in the Peace Corps"

 
Myron Butler

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

Marrs McLean Science Bldg (Room GL60)

“Lessons Learned: An Insider's View on the Music Industry”

 
Nekpen Osuan

Friday: 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Fentress Room)

"Learning From Failure"

Personal and professional leadership setbacks are inevitable. At any stage of life, the ability to learn from your setbacks is critical. As leaders, the pressures of success, complex group member personalities and competing obligations can often overwhelm our perspective. Any leader can find themselves at the consequences of poor decisions, moral compromise, or simply a bad decision. This workshop offers best practices to learn how to identify a leadership setback, how to gain insight on the lesson to be learned from failure, and how to heal to move forward in your leadership journey.

 
Olayinka Obasanya

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

SUB (Claypool Room)

 

Saturday: 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 303)

"Is Christianity a White Man's Religion?"


This seminar will look to bring insight from a historical, social, and spiritual angle on the questions that are plaguing the mind of many black people in America. Is Christianity A White Man’s religion? Was Christianity purposed as a means to control
black people? Is the black church even relevant today? Join us as we discuss and dig deep into these questions.

 

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 303)

#RelationshipGoals101

#RelationshipGoals is a popular hashtag seen on social media. However as many know, #RelationshipGoals aren’t always what they seem. What are relationship goals according to social media and how do we strive for/attain healthy relationship goals that are free from toxicity!

 
Oliver Telusma

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

SUB (Lipscomb Room)

"Evaluating Transformationoal Politics in the American South: Organizing and Political Leadership Since the 1950s"

Attendees will not only engage in dialogue on both the importance of organizing in the South today and
political and organizational implications of the Southern Bloc and Nixon's Southern Strategy on organizing and federal politics today; but also give students the tools on how to effectively fundraise, organize and lead in a decolonized manner in the South.

 
Paakow Essandoh

Saturday: 2:00-2:50 pm, 3:00-3:50 pm

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 126)

"Your Vibe Attracts Your Tribe"

A defining quality in a leader is whether or not you’re able to build your tribe and connect a group of people to one single idea. I plan on going over networking, the importance and strengths of bond building, how to truly cultivate a community, and how all is necessary to grow a lasting business endeavor.

 
Ralph Watson

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Baines Room)

ManHood: A conversation for Black Men


ManHood will be a courageous conversation amongst of  men attending the conference. In this workshop we will examine the stereotypes of Black men in society also gather information as a collective on changes that can be implemented that will directly help this group of men.

 
Rasheed Ali Cromwell

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 102)

"The Gift & The Curse: Young, Talented, & Overextended (Part I and Part II) TM"

Stressed out? Too tired to make it to that next meeting? Is it the same small group of people doing all the work on your campus? Well this powerful session is for you! It is time for you to break this vicious cycle with the cure for the curse! This high-energy exchange is a unique blend of energy and time management, personal and professional prioritizing, leadership delegation/training, as well as best methods and strategies. These elements are necessary, because leaders often spend all their time advancing organizations without pouring into themselves. It is critical for both new and seasoned leaders to start by minimizing obligations and maximizing performance.

Saturday: 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 102)

“All We Do Is Step, Stroll and Hop?!: What is a Black Greek-Letter Organization? (Part I and Part II)”

(open to both Greek and non-Greek members)

The movie Burning Sands and Step Sister have changed the land scape of D9 in 2018.  Despite this popular media presence, the general public still knows very little about the historical significance and major contributions that these organizations and its members have made throughout the world.  All We Do is Step and Stroll?! is a very interactive and engaging presentation that ultimately answers the question: “What is a Black Greek" To illustrate the evolution of these organizations, the program creatively incorporates and blends videos, African-American History, audience participation and demonstrations of African traditions and customs, as well as highlights the mass media’s influences through pop culture.  The facilitator also shares the relationships between Black and multicultural Greek-letter organizations, BSA/BSU and other peer groups and how they can work together to have a stronger impact on the community

 
Robert Darden

Friday: 3:35-4:25 pm

Marrs McLean Science Bldg (Room 302)

"Hold On! From Freedom Songs to #BlackLivesMatter"


Darden is the founder of the Black Gospel Music Restoration, the world's largest initiative to acquire, digitize and catalog America's fast-vanishing legacy of gospel music vinyl. The BGMRP provides the gospel music for the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History & Culture and is currently working with the museum on an exhibit on the impact of Black Preaching in America for the 2020 exhibition season.

 
Romeal Dorasay

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Houston Room)

“By Invitation Only”

Who do we allow in our lives? Are they there to help or hurt us? This workshop is designed to address the relationships that we allow ourselves to get involved in. The decision to allow people to come into our lives by invitation can turn our lives upside down in a positive or more often a negative way. In this workshop we will discuss every aspect of relationships such as personal, professional, or intimate. We will review the hurts, challenges, and disappointments of these relationships.

 

Friday: 3:35-4:25 pm

Marrs McLean Science Bldg 303

"Breaking the Cycle"


Cycles are meant to be broken. It is time for us, as the Black Community and as Young
Leaders, to Break Cycles of Violence and negative influences from hindering the process of Black Youth. Join us as we examine the family dynamics of generational curses and explain the problems that may happen within "the four walls of a home" and how they branch outside the home.

 

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business Room 303

"Tricked, Trapped, and Trifling!!!!"

 
Ryan Reed

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25pm

SUB (Claypool Room)

“Banking on Your Future”

In this workshop, we will explore the area of personal finance which will shed light on the importance of financial literacy.  The topics for discussion will be budgeting, revenues (income), expenses, savings, and spending habits.  The objective of this workshop is to provide insight on how to successfully manage personal finances while setting up financial security for the future.  Our goal is to have an interactive course that will provoke discussion amongst all persons present.

 
Sabrina Coleman

Saturday: 10:00-10:50 am, 11:00-11:50 am

Paul L. Foster Campus for Business (Room 329)

"Backpacks to Briefcases"

According to a study published by Time, Money magazine, one out of every four workers with a bachelor’s degree is overqualified for their job. This essentially means that employees are not maximizing their potential to receive opportunities which meets their credentials. This workshop will teach attendees how to build a professional brand around themselves with a targeted career goal in mind
in order to attract premium business opportunities.  

 
Sean Baker

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Fentress Room)

“Inclusive Leadership”

Inclusive Leadership and Global Mindset

At EY, inclusive leadership is pivotal to the way we do work.  It’ll also impact you, too, no matter where you head after college or what you do.  After graduation, whether you will take a position in government, in finance or accounting, or for a non-profit, we live in a borderless world and inclusive leadership is an essential skill.  Those who have a global mindset and lead inclusively will have the biggest impact – and the most success.  Join us for this great and interactive session.

 
Sopha Rush

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Lipscomb Room)

“Your Gifts, Your Call”

This workshop will include the tools needed to discover the spiritual gifts and calling over your life. We will walk through what it means to walk boldly in your purpose and what it means to truly understand your calling that God has over your life. We will have the opportunity to discuss the challenges and fears one may have when pursuing after their God given dreams and how you can have the confidence to use whatever gifts you may have.

 

T'Erica Hudson

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

SUB (Fentress Room) 

“Campus Leadership”

In this interactive presentation, student organizations will gain an understanding of why “Black” Student Leadership matter on college campuses. Similar to the Black Lives Matter Movement it is essential to unpack and unfold the strategies, style and substance of Black Leadership through campus organizations, elected positions and/or appointments. This presentation/workshop will highlight the strategies on how to effectively run for office(s) and how to fulfill/ sustain campus leadership positions as a student of color.

 

Tai M. Brown & Tierra Barber

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

Marrs McLane Science Bldg GL53

“Leave it Better than You Found it: The Lost Art of Accountability”

In our relationships with people, places, and things, we tend to overlook the importance of what is expected of us. The success of those relationships depends on our level of accountability and our willingness to adjust accordingly.

This presentation explores the value in understanding and fulfilling expectations within the roles we play in life.

 

Tish Norman

Friday: 2:30-3:20 pm, 3:35-4:25 pm

SUB (Barfield Room)

"Memory and The Black Sorority: An Intersectional Cultural Analysis of the Role of Imagery in Black Fraternalism"

The key to improving relations among Black Greeks is awareness. This session enlightens audiences on Black Greek life experiences from post-World War II through to the 1990s, leading up to present day, covering topics from the emergence of BGLOs, their subsequent expansion, and extraordinary cultural displays and performances on campus to hip hop culture of the millennium.   
Tish’s prolific presentation and conference favorite is visually-driven, by featuring archival images, drawn from various collegiate and personal collections, which documents the experiences of Black Greek-letter sororities from the mid to the latter half of the 20th century.

 
Tonya Rapley

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Lipscomb Room)

“My Fab Finance”

 

Friday: 1:25-2:15 pm

SUB (Baines Room)

“My Fab Finance”

 
Too Black

Friday:10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Claypool Room)

"Art Impacts"


Art Impacts the way we see the world from all angles. It helps us gauge our perception of social issues in facets that other disciplines simply cannot do. Art is also a form of propaganda that often relays social
messages. History has unfortunately shown art (film, literature, television) has been used to advance hegemonic ideas that negatively affect marginalized populations. It has also been used as counter-propaganda to challenge hegemonic notions for liberatory purposes. This workshop will focus on the propaganda that exists within modern day art.

 
Trevor Thompson

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Baines Room)

“Pinball Machines, Tomatoes, and Neurogenesis: A Quick Guide To Being A Good Student”

In this workshop I will discuss some of the biological and behavioral foundations of being a good student. Specifically, my workshop discusses what foods to eat, actions to perform, and behaviors to adhere to that increases a student's natural academic potential. Studying is not random or difficult; there is a tried and true method of success that involves different cycles of focus and rest to improve retention. Moreover, there are biological mechanisms we can use to help us solve complex problems. If executed consistently, these things will increase the natural learning ability of a student over time, and therefore, their academic performance

 

"Mental Health & The Black Community" (Panel)

Friday: 10:10-11:00 am

SUB (Beckham Room)