Dec
2
2019
WACO, Texas (Dec. 2, 2019) – Americans travel farther on average to their worship places than they did a decade ago. But while those who belong to a congregation in their neighborhood attend more often, “worshipping local” does not make them feel closer to their neighbors or more satisfied with the neighborhood, according to a new study by researchers at Baylor University and Calvin University.
Feb
18
2019
WACO, Texas (Feb. 18, 2019) — Women are more likely than men to believe the Bible is literally true, but a recent Baylor University study finds this may have more to do with how people relate to God than it does gender. Both men and women who report high levels of closeness to God take the Bible more literally – and this confidence grows stronger as they seek closeness to God through prayer and Bible study.
Apr
23
2018
WACO, Texas (April 23, 2018) — Whites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities — but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations’ influence, a Baylor University study has found.
Feb
20
2018
WACO (Feb. 20, 2018) — Republicans who believe that God is highly engaged with humanity are like Democrats — more liberal — when it comes to social and economic justice issues, according to a Baylor University study.
Jan
16
2018
WACO, Texas (Jan. 16, 2018) — Internet use may decrease the likelihood of a person affiliating with a religious tradition or believing that only one religion is true, according to a Baylor University study.
Nov
27
2017
WACO, Texas (Nov. 27, 2017) — White male gun owners who have lost, or fear losing, their economic footing tend to feel morally and emotionally attached to their guns, according to a Baylor University study.
Sep
15
2017
Sept. 14, 2017
Many Trump supporters see God as an authoritative “Old Testament kind of God” rather than benevolent or distant, according to the latest findings from the Baylor Religion Survey. “They believe natural disasters can be punishments and they most likely believe miracles can happen because God intervenes in human affairs,” said Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology. Many also believe Trump’s election is a result of divine intervention. The survey also included findings about mental health and religion, religion and technology and religion and geography.
Sep
15
2017
Sept. 13, 2017
When determining how religion was associated with voter support for Donald Trump, none of the normal ways of measuring religiosity really predicted a vote for Trump except Christian nationalism, said sociologist Andrew Whitehead, Ph.D., a former researcher at Baylor and one of 15 professors who did analyses for the latest wave of the Baylor Religion Survey. While Trump’s win was largely due to a coalition that was overwhelmingly white and Christian, “It didn’t matter if you were evangelical or mainline (Christian), it didn’t matter if you went to church a lot or a little, what mattered was whether you think America is a Christian nation,” he said. The survey of more than 1,501 participants was done in the early months after Trump’s election.
Sep
14
2017
WACO, Texas (Sept. 14, 2017) — Despite the pervasive use of the Internet in everyday life, most Americans report they never use it to find religious or spiritual content, and most never use it to share religious views, according to the Baylor Religion Survey.
Sep
14
2017
Sept. 14, 2017
The Internet is used for many reasons in everyday life, but most Americans report they never use it to find religious or spiritual content — or to share their religious views, according to a recent Baylor University survey. But among those who do proselytize online, Evangelicals and Black Protestants are the most likely to do so, said Baylor researcher Paul McClure. Another finding of Baylor Religion Survey was that those with no religious affiliation are the most likely to feel addicted to technology. The survey, with 1,501 participants, was designed by Baylor scholars and administered by the Gallup Organization.
Sep
12
2017
Sept. 12, 2017
Blog about findings by Baylor University sociologists in the latest wave of the Baylor Religion Survey, which was presented recently at the Religion Newswriters Association conference. The national survey found that while evangelical whites overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump and shared much of what he was against, he did not champion the notion of a Christian America regularly. But Trump’s calls for making America great again created “a broad canvas that enabled those who had a religious vision of the country to project their own portrait of the country,” wrote Pittsburgh Post-Gazette religion writer Peter Smith. Paul Froese, Ph.D., professor of sociology and survey director, said that the notion that the nation’s origins were Christian “has this overarching idea that if you're not a Christian then you're not truly an American."
Sep
12
2017
Sept. 11, 2017
The latest findings from Baylor Religion Survey reveal that Americans are deeply fearful of each other — and conservative Christians are among the groups arousing suspicion. More than 36 percent of U.S. adults polled said conservative Christians want to limit their freedom. By comparison, 35 percent said Muslims are out to restrict their liberties, and 27 percent expressed such concerns about atheists. Regular church attenders overall are most likely to say atheists have inferior values, while those who attend rarely or never are most likely to point to conservative Christians as having inferior values. The survey was presented recently in Nashville at the Religion Newswriters Association conference by Baylor sociologists Paul Froese, Ph.D., Jerry Park, Ph.D., and Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D.
Sep
8
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Americans who voted for President Trump are often very religious, believe in God and hold traditional views about gender, according to the latest wave of Baylor Religion Survey, presented in Nashville Thursday at the national annual conference of Religion Newswriters Association. The survey also found that Trump supporters are more likely than other voters to see Muslims as threats to America and to view the country as a Christian one. Presenting the report were Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology; Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology; and Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology.
Sep
8
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
VIDEO: Trumpism is a new form of nationalism that merges pro-Christian beliefs with anti-Muslim, anti-feminism, anti-globalism and anti-government attitudes, according to new findings from Baylor Religion Survey, presented Thursday in Nashville at the Religion Newswriters Association conference.
Sep
8
2017
Sept. 8, 2017
VIDEO: New findings from Baylor Religion Survey show that "every religious indicator predicts voting for Trump except belonging to a black church or belonging to a non-Christian house of worship," said Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology. The survey was presented in Nashville on Thursday at the Religion Newswriters Association conference.
Sep
8
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Americans often criticize moral concerns and political interests of people who don't share their beliefs, according to new findings from Baylor Religion Survey. The findings were presented at the Religion Newswriters Association conference in Nashville on Thursday. Conservative Christians and religious "nones" fear each other, but it is more about politics then faith, the survey found.
Sep
7
2017
WACO, Texas (Sept. 7, 2017) — “Trumpism” — a new form of nationalism that merges pro-Christian rhetoric with anti-Islam, anti-feminist, anti-globalist and anti-government attitudes — and a fear of “others” emerged as prominent patterns among Americans in the latest findings of the Baylor Religion Survey.
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Many Americans fear other identity groups of different religions or political leanings, according to the latest analysis from the Baylor Religion Survey. It was presented by Baylor sociologists Paul Froese, Ph.D., Jerry Park, Ph.D., and Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D., to the Religion Newswriters Association in Nashville at its annual conference. Part of the study examined negative attitudes toward four groups – atheists, conservative Christians, Jews and Muslims – and found that Americans generally harbor fears and judgment about all four, whether that be seeing them as a physical threat or as having terrible values. Froese, survey director and professor of sociology, said that “We are finding more and more that party identity is a cultural identity as much as religion is.”
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Americans who voted for President Trump are often very religious, believe in God and hold traditional views about gender, according to the latest wave of Baylor Religion Survey, presented in Nashville Thursday at the national annual conference of Religion Newswriters Association. The survey also found that Trump supporters are more likely than other voters to see Muslims as threats to America and to view the country as a Christian one. Presenting the report were Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology; Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology; and Lindsay Wilkinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology.
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Technology does not scare Americans, nor does the fear of Hell or worries about getting into Heaven. But the fears and suspicions about those with different beliefs than their own very much concerns Americans, according to the latest wave of the Baylor Religion Survey. The report was presented Thursday in Nashville at the Religion Newswriters Association conference. Presenting the research were Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology; Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology; and Lindsay Wilkinson, assistant professor of sociology. For centuries, Catholics and Jewish people bore the brunt of a nation’s religious prejudices, but today, Muslims, atheists and conservative Christians are the most feared.
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
VIDEO: Nearly half of Americans believe they are heaven-bound, people who believe they are going to heaven are less likely to have depression or anxiety, and most Americans say they don’t share their religious beliefs online. Those are among the findings in the latest analysis from the Baylor Religion Survey. The report -- the latest analysis of “American Values, Mental Health and Using Technology in the Age of Trump” -- was presented at the Religion Newswriters Association’s annual conference in Nashville. Presenting it were Baylor sociologists Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology; Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociologist; and Lindsay Wilkinson, assistant professor of sociology.
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Americans who voted for President Donald Trump tend to call themselves very religious, think Muslims are a threat to the country and see the U.S. as a Christian nation, according to the latest wave of the Baylor Religion Survey, which included 1,501 respondents from across the country. The report was presented at the annual conference of Religion Newswriters Association, held Thursday in Nashville. Researchers also found that Trump voters tend to believe in an authoritative God and prefer men and women to adhere to traditional gender roles. Presenting the research were Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology; Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology; and Lindsay Wilkinson, assistant professor of sociology. The survey also found that nearly half of Americans are certain they will end up in heaven after they die.
Sep
7
2017
Sept. 7, 2017
Americans who support President Trump tend to rely on values tied to “pro-Christian rhetoric with anti-Islam, anti-feminist, anti-globalist and anti-government attitudes,” according to new national findings from the Baylor Religion Survey, presented Thursday in Nashville at the Religion Newswriters Association. Trump voters also tend to believe in an authoritative God, value gender traditionalism and oppose LGBT rights. Those who embrace Trump’s rhetoric may be skeptical of the study itself, said Paul Froese, Ph.D., survey director and professor of sociology. “If the people around you, who you trust and love, say, ‘Don’t believe in evolution,’ or ‘Don’t believe in global warming,’ it doesn’t matter if I can show you scientifically that these things have some basis,” Froese said. “It won’t resonate.”
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