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NetTracker/Web Terminology

 

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Banner Ad (Advertisement)—Banner ads are graphic images located on Web pages that contain advertising copy inviting users to click the banner ad to go to the advertiser's Web site.

Browser—Also known as a Web browser. Software that is used to view Web pages located on the Internet or an intranet. Two popular browsers are Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator.

Cache Bandwidth Ratio—The percentage of bandwidth (in megabytes) that was cached by your proxy server or firewall. (Cached Bandwidth - Total Bandwidth)x 100 = Cache Bandwidth Ratio.

Cache Hit Ratio—The percentage of hits that were cached by your proxy server or firewall. (Cached Hits _ Total Hits) x 100 = Cache Hit Ratio.

Clickthrough—An event in which a Web site visitor clicks a banner ad, thus exiting the Web site to visit the Web site that is linked to the banner ad.

Clickthrough Rate—The percentage of banner ad impressions (views) that the viewer clicked (clickthroughs). (Clickthroughs - Impressions) x 100 = Clickthrough Rate.

Clip—A single file on a streaming media server.

Cookie—A small amount of information sent by a Web server and stored in a browser to identify the visitor for a visit or longer.

Department—A group of hosts or users that have been identified as belonging to the same group (such as the Finance Department on a corporate intranet).

Didn't Stay—The visit or session length that results from a visitor or user viewing or downloading only one file.

Domain—A group of network addresses that are in some way related. Each domain has a suffix that indicates to which top-level domain it belongs. There are only a limited number of top-level domains. Examples include com (commercial business), edu (educational institutions), net (network organizations), org (organizations, nonprofit), gov (government agencies) and mil (military).

Download—A request by a user to transfer a file from the FTP server or streaming media server to the user (client).

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Ending Clip—The last clip that a visitor downloaded before ending a session.

Ending Page—The last page Mat a proxy server or firewall user viewed before ending a session.

Entry Page—The first page that a visitor viewed during a visit to a Web site. Although the entry page is often the same as a Web site's home page, in many cases visitors enter a Web site on different pages due to different links from other Web sites.

Error—A combination of a file (usually a page or clip) and an error message that appears when a visitor attempts to view or download it. Often errors occur because of broken links (links to pages that do not exist anymore) or when an unauthorized visitor attempts to access restricted pages (for example, if the visitor does not have a password to access the page).

Error Hit—A hit to a Web site that results in an error. An example of an error hit would be a hit to a page that resulted in an error message such as "file not found."

Exit Page—The last page that a visitor viewed before exiting a Web site.

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Hit—A single request to a Web server. Thus, a single HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) document containing multiple images (.JPG, GIF, etc.) would be counted as multiple hits to a Web site. In addition, erroneous requests to transfer files are also counted as hits.

Host—A computer that is connected to the Internet. A host can be represented by a host name (for example, machinel.sane.com) and by an IP (Internet Protocol) address on the Internet (for example, 194.122.251.1).

Impression—A view of a banner ad located on a Web page. Keyword A word or group of words that a visitor entered into a search engine or directory in order to search for Web sites containing information related to these words.

Local Keyword—A word or group of words that a visitor entered into a local search engine (on the local Web site, versus on a search engine such as Yahoo) to search for information on the Web site related to these words.

New Visit—A visit by a visitor who has never been to your site before. Once a visitor has visited your site, all future visits are repeat visits. For example, if a visitor visits your site once in January, again in January and twice in February, the second visit in January and both visits in February are considered repeat visits. No visitor can ever have more than one new visit.

New Visitor— A visitor visiting your site for the first time.

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Overall Profile—A collection of reports that compare or combine statistics from all the profiles of a single type (Web server, proxy server/firewall, FTP server, streaming media server).

Page—Any requested file except those on the Excluded Pages list. For example, a page could be an HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) document, an image, a lava applet, etc.(For details on Excluded Pages, see "Excluding Pages, Files, or Clips from the Reports".)

Parameter—An item of information-such as a visitor identification or product name-that is passed to a Web server by a user or another program.

Path—A group of 2-10 consecutive pages viewed by a Web site visitor. (You define the number of pages on the General Options page in the profile options or when creating a custom Path Summary.)

Platform—A specific operating system (such as Windows 2000, Mac OS X, etc.).

Player—Software that is used to listen to or view streaming media clips located on the Internet or an intranet. RealPlayer and Quicklime Player are examples of players.

Profile—A collection of reports that analyze the same Web site, proxy server, firewall, FTP server, or streaming media server.

Referrer—A site or page that links to another page. Many times the link takes visitors to a page that is on an entirely different Web site. This is the case when a user is referred to a Web site from a search engine such as Yahoo. Sometimes users are referred to a page within the same Web site by another page in the Web site (such as the home page).

Repeat Visit—A visit by a visitor who has been to your site at least once before. Once a visitor has visited your site once, all future visits are repeat visits. For example, if a visitor visits your site once in January, again in January, and twice in February, the second visit in January and both visits in February are considered Repeat Visits.

Repeat Visitor—A visitor who has been to your site at least once before.

Report—A summary, breakdown, or dashboard. Reports present the data in the profile.

Robot—A nonhuman agent that visits Web sites for any purpose. For example, a robot could check pages for updates or check to make sure a site is still on the Internet.

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Session (Proxy Server/Firewall Profiles)—A series of consecutive views of one or more Web sites by the same user. If the user does not view a new Web page in the specified period of time (the default is 30 minutes), the next page viewed by that user is considered the start of a new session.

Session (FTP Server Profiles and Streaming Media Server Profiles)—A series of consecutive downloads from an FTP server or streaming media server by the same user or visitor. If the user does not download another file in the specified period of time (the default is 30 minutes), the next file downloaded by that user is considered the start of a new session.

Session Duration (FTP Server Profiles and Streaming Media Server Profiles)—The length of time a user spends downloading files from an FTP server or streaming media server during a session. For analysis and presentation purposes, session durations are broken into categories such as "Didn't Stay," "Less than 1 minute," "'1-2 minutes," etc.

Session Duration (Proxy Server/Firewall Profiles)—The length of time a specific user spends accessing the Internet through a proxy server or firewall during a session. For analysis and presentation purposes, session durations are broken into categories such as "Didn't Stay," "Less than 1 minute," "1-2 minutes," etc.

Short Profile Name—The one-word name for the profile. This is the word that appears in parentheses in the list of available profiles at the Profile Manager. If you created the profile during installation, the short profile name is reports.

Site—Also known as a Web site. A location on the Internet or an intranet.

Spider—A nonhuman agent that visits Web sites in order to index the Web sites for the agent's search engine or directory.

Starting Clip—The first clip that a visitor downloaded from a streaming media server during a session. Starting Page. The first page that a user viewed during a session through a proxy server or firewall.

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Traversal—An individual journey by a Web site visitor that follows a specific path.

Unique Error—A distinct combination of a request and error message. If multiple visitors receive the same error
message while making the same request, it is only one unique error.

Unique Visitor—A distinct visitor to a Web site. Regardless of how many times you visit a Web site, you are only one unique visitor.

User—A visitor that accessed a Web site, FTP server, proxy server, or firewall by entering a proper user name and password.

Unique Error—A distinct combination of a request and error message. If multiple visitors receive the same error
message while making the same request, it is only one unique error.

View—A hit to a Web page, excluding error hits and hits to user-defined files such as inline images (.JPG, GIF, etc.), Java applets, and specific redirects.

Visit—A series of consecutive views of a Web site by the same visitor. If the visitor does not view a new Web page in the specified period of time (the default is 30 minutes), the next page viewed by that visitor is considered the start of a new visit.

Visit Duration—The length of time a specific visitor spends on a Web site during a visit. For analysis and presentation purposes, visit durations are broken down into categories such as "Didn't Stay," "Less than 1 minute," "1-2 minutes'; etc.

Visitor—A person or agent who views content on a Web site or downloads content from an FTP server or a streaming media server. For sites that require a user name and password to log in, a visitor is defined by the user name. For sites that use cookies, a visitor is defined by the cookie transmitted by the visitor's browser. If no cookie or user name is transmitted, NetTracker uses a combination of a host name/IP address and a user agent. (For details on configuring NetTracker to use cookies or authenticated user names, see "Changing How NetTracker Sessionizes Traffic".)

Visitor Retention—Whether or not visitors come back to your Web site after their initial visit and how many times they return. NetTracker reports visitor retention by showing the number of visitors who have made specified numbers of visits (for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5-6, 7-9).

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