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The Baylor Impact is published quarterly by the Baylor School of Education.

The Baylor Impact
School of Education
Baylor University
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Cyber Bullying (w x h, 0 KB)Program Research: Global Cyber-Bullying in the 21st Century

Bullies have gone high tech and become gender equal. Research  shows that cyber-bullies in Japan are predominantly females  between the ages of 12 and 17 who use the Internet and cell phones to send email, text messages and digital pictures that are  designed to create psychological stress for another individual. 

Findings from Baylor’s Tony L. Talbert and Ikuko Aoyama indicate  today’s cyber-bullying teen activities fit into one or more sociocultural  categories such as flaming, harassment, cyber-stalking,  denigration, masquerading, outing, trickery and exclusion. Talbert,  associate professor of social studies education and qualitative  researcher in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction,  and Aoyama, Japanese international student and educational  psychology doctoral candidate, traveled to Tokyo, Japan, in May 2008 to collect ethnographic interview and observation data from  middle and high school students in Japanese public schools.

“In Japan, Canada, Australia and Europe there seems to be some  attention to cyber-bullying, but not in the United States,” Talbert  says. Funded through the BaylorUniversity Research Council  and a School of Education research sabbatical, the present study  gathered data through an online survey and semi-structured  interviews. The analysis of more than 100 responses describes the  breadth and depth of cyber-bullying among public high school and  middle school students in Tokyo and surrounding areas in Japan. 

Talbert and Aoyama reported their preliminary findings at the Fifth  International Conference on Social Justice and Teacher Education  at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Additional survey and interview  data from U.S. public school students will be collected and analyzed  during fall 2008. 

“Cyber-bullying is a growing problem internationally and while there  have been many studies on traditional bullying, there have been few  studies on cyber-bullying in the United States,” Aoyama notes. 

Combined with the Japanese student data, the present research  will generate additional external grant proposals and research  journal manuscripts recommending cyber-bullying prevention and  intervention strategies for teachers, parents, administrators, policymakers,  and students attending public schools in Japan and the  United States. 



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