Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Christianity Today: Why Protestant Pastors Need a Sabbath
[2/24/2015]
Feb. 23, 2015
More than a third of U.S. Protestant pastors are obese, with some of the reasons being that pastors are stressed and need to take a Sabbath, according to a study by Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this research story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The New York Times: Married Sex Gets Better in the Golden Years
[2/24/2015]
Feb. 23, 2015
While people in the early years of marriage have sex more frequently, and their sexual activity tapers off over time, a modest rebound occurs for those whose marriages last longer than half a century, according to a study by researchers from Louisiana State University, Florida State University and Baylor University. Quoted is former Baylor researcher Samuel Stroope, now an assistant professor of sociology at LSU. Researcher Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was a study co-author. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story and arranged interviews with the reporter. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Washington Times: 5 ways to help your friend who's struggling with faith
[2/19/2015]
Feb. 16, 2015
Article mentions research from Baylor University, which found that believing in and praying to God makes people feel happier and healthier. The study was done by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who is quoted in the article. “For many individuals, God is a major source of comfort and strength that makes the world seem less threatening and dangerous,” he said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research story to national media outlets in August 2014. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Health Cast: Golden Anniversaries May Bring an Added Special Glow
[2/19/2015]
Feb. 16, 2015
While sexual activity for married couples tapers off over time, a slight rebound occurs for those whose marriages endure longer than half a century, according to new research by Baylor University, Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Quoted are Samuel Stroope, Ph.D., former researcher with Baylor University who now is an assistant professor of sociology at LSU, and co-author Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Fox News: Married? Your sex life will 'rebound' ... in 50 years
[2/17/2015]
Feb. 17, 2015
While most married couples have sex less often over time, sociologists who did a study of 1,656 married adults aged 57 to 85 have found there is a slight uptick in the frequency with which couples have sex after the half-century mark of marriage. The relationship’s permanence, with its accompanying experience and knowledge, may play a role. The study, by researchers from Baylor, Louisiana State University and Florida State University, was published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Deseret News: 5 ways to help your friend who's struggling with faith
[2/17/2015]
Feb. 15, 2015
Article mentions research from Baylor University, which found that believing in and praying to God makes people feel happier and healthier. The study was done by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who is quoted in the article. “For many individuals, God is a major source of comfort and strength that makes the world seem less threatening and dangerous,” he said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research story to national media outlets in August 2014. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

University Herald: Religion Could Help Sexual Victims Deal with Distrust
[2/13/2015]
Feb. 4, 2015
Religion can help college women who have been sexually victimized overcome emotional damage and regain trust, according to a Baylor University study titled “Religious Coping: The Role of Religion in Attenuating the Effect of Sexual Victimization of College Women on Trust.” Quoted is Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Black Christian News Network One: Baylor University Study Finds College Women Who Are Sexual Assault Victims Can Find Healing In Religious Groups
[2/12/2015]
Feb. 11, 2015
Theological beliefs and belonging to religious organizations can help college women overcome the emotional damage caused by sexual abuse, a recently published Baylor University study has found. Quoted is study author Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty. She pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Baptist News Global: College sexual assault victims healed by religious communities, chaplains and study say
[2/11/2015]
Feb. 11, 2015
Theological beliefs and belonging to religious organizations can help college women overcome the emotional damage caused by sexual abuse, a recently published Baylor University study has found. Quoted is study author Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty. She pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Psych Central: Religion Can Help Women Cope With Sexual Assault
[2/10/2015]
Feb. 4, 2015
Religion can help college women who have been sexually victimized overcome emotional damage and regain trust, according to a Baylor University study titled “Religious Coping: The Role of Religion in Attenuating the Effect of Sexual Victimization of College Women on Trust.” Quoted is Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

The Alabama Baptist: Once among the healthiest of professions, clergy seeing spike in obesity
[1/27/2015]
Jan. 26, 2015
More than a third of American clergy members are obese, with stress long hours, low pay and lack of self-care being among the culprits, according to a Baylor University study. But the profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier — such as sabbaticals and theological support for one day a week off — if they can take advantage of them, according to lead researcher Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. The study was published in the journal Social Science Research. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Newsmax Health: Clergy Prone to Obesity: Study
[1/22/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Health.com: For Pastors, It's Easy to Pack on the Pounds
[1/21/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. HealthDay is a leading producer and syndicator of evidence-based health news. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Healthfinder.gov: For Pastors, It's Easy to Pack on the Pounds
[1/20/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. HealthDay is a leading producer and syndicator of evidence-based health news. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Medical News Today: Why more than a third of American clergy are overweight
[1/16/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Baptist Standard: Sabbath rest can help portly pastors fight fat, Baylor study shows
[1/16/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Philadelphia Inquirer: For Pastors, It's Easy to Pack on the Pounds
[1/16/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
Stress, long hours, low pay and lack of self-care are among the reasons that more than one third of pastors are overweight, according to a study by Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. Ferguson is quoted about mechanisms within the profession — among them taking a day off, sabbaticals and peer support groups — that can aid pastors if they take advantage of them. This story, originally published by HealthDay, has been republished nationwide. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

ABC News Radio: Obesity Epidemic Within Clergy Community
[1/16/2015]
Jan. 15, 2015
While pastors’ job is to take care of their congregations, many do not take enough care of their own health, which might explain why 30 percent are now considered obese, according to a study of pastors by Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Baylor University’s College of Arts & Sciences. Eating is a coping mechanism and Ferguson asked the participants to fill out a “distress index” that measured stress ranging from how often they felt lonely to the number of times they worked more than 46 hours a week. Pastors have built-in opportunities for better health within their profession if they take advantage of them — among them sabbaticals, one day off weekly that is mandated by many faith traditions and pastoral peer support. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

HealthDay: For Pastors, It's Easy to Pack on the Pounds
[1/15/2015]
Jan. 14, 2015
More than a third of American clergy are obese, according to a new study from Baylor University. Stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care are among the potential causes. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted is Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. HealthDay is a leading producer and syndicator of evidence-based health news. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers research and faculty in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

Portly Pastors Widespread, but Sabbaticals and Peer Support Can Help Fight Fat, Baylor Study Finds
[1/12/2015]
WACO, Texas (Jan. 12, 2015) — More than a third of American clergy members are obese, with stress, longer hours, being underpaid and lack of self-care among the reasons, according to a Baylor University study. But the pastoral profession has some built-in prevention methods that can help clergy be healthier if they take advantage of them.
(FULL STORY)

Washington Times: Study finds over a third of America’s clergy are obese due to stress, long hours
[1/12/2015]
Jan. 12, 2015
More than a third of American clergy members are obese, with stress, longer hours and being underpaid among the reasons, according to a Baylor study. But the profession has some built-in mechanisms that can help pastors be healthier if they take advantage of them. Quoted about the study, published in the journal “Social Science Research,” is lead researcher Todd W. Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Baylor Sociologist Earns Award from Gerontological Society of America for Her Research on Older Adults
[1/8/2015]

(FULL STORY)

The NWI Times (Munster, IN): Jobs: Local Benefits
[1/7/2015]
Dec. 28, 2014
A recent Baylor study published in the journal “Local Economy” found that employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employees. Employees at locally owned and operated firms were more likely to "have a sense of belonging to the organization," says Katie Halbesleben, the study's lead author and a doctoral student in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.(Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and pitched this research to national and regional media in November.)
(FULL STORY)

Baylor Sociologist Earns Award from Gerontological Society of America for Her Research on Older Adults
[1/7/2015]
WACO, Texas (Jan. 8, 2015) — Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of sociology in Baylor University’s College of Arts & Sciences, has won the 2014 Senior Service America Junior Scholar Award from the Gerontological Society of America.
(FULL STORY)

Benefitspro.com: Factors impacting employee loyalty and commitment
[12/22/2014]
Dec. 22, 2014
A recent Baylor student found that employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employees. For rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than does job satisfaction. "It's an interesting time because of the shift toward big business and globalization, but there are still practical values of small and local businesses, including benefits to the community and to the individual, such as less income inequality, less population turnover, lower crime and more committed workers," said Katie Halbesleben, a doctoral student in Baylor’s department of sociology and lead author of the study published in the journal “Local Economy.” (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers research and faculty in the department of sociology and pitched this research to national and regional media in November.)
(FULL STORY)


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