Brandon Martinez
Aaron Franzen


E-mail: Brandon Martinez

Research Assistant
Sociology of Religion
Ph.D. student, ABD, Expected Graduation in May 2015
M.A., Sociology, Baylor University, 2012
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, 2009
B.A., Religion and Sociology, Texas Christian University, 2005


Curriculum Vitae

Department of Sociology
P.O. Box 97326
Waco, TX 76798
(254) 710-7073

Brandon Martinez’s research interests are in race and ethnicity, the sociology of religion, discrimination, inequality, and political sociology. His dissertation examines how the intersection of race and religion influence the social world. He has published in peer-reviewed journals including the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion and Social Science Quarterly.  His current research includes racial stratification within congregations and political divides within American evangelicalism.

Peer Reviewed Publications:

Forthcoming. Samuel Stroope, Brandon C. Martinez, Karl Eschbach, M. Kristen Peek, and Kyriakos S. Markides. "Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking among Older Mexican American Men: Results from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly." Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

Forthcoming. Lydia Bean and Brandon C. Martinez. “Sunday School Teacher, Culture Warrior: The Politics of Lay Leaders in Three Religious Traditions.” Social Science Quarterly.  doi: 10.1111/ssqu.12080  Online Appendix

Forthcoming. Lydia Bean and Brandon C. Martinez. “Evangelical Ambivalence towards Gays and Lesbians.” Sociology of Religion.

2014 Jerry Z. Park and Brandon C. Martinez. “Young Elite Asian Americans and the Model Minority Stereotype: The Nativity Effect.” Studies on Asia, Series IV, Volume 4 (1): 78-107.

2013 Brandon C. Martinez and Kevin D. Dougherty. “Race, Belonging and Participation in Religious Congregations.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 52 (4): 713-732.

2013 Brandon C. Martinez. “Is Evil Good for Religion? The Correlation between the Belief in Supernatural Evil and Religious Commitment.” Review of Religious Research 55 (3):319-338.