Research 1 The department of Sociology is one of the most prolific departments at Baylor. Read the feature stories and press releases highlighting the faculty's work.

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Student image for splashStudents choose Baylor's sociology program for many reasons. Hear from students themselves how academic rigor, accessible faculty and research opportunities prepare them for career in the field or academia.
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Lifestyles After 50: A powerful way to beat depression
[6/9/2015]
June 8, 2015
Article about mental illness in celebrities and others cites the Wave III Baylor Religion Survey. Quoted is Paul Froese, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and part of the research team that studied the connection between mental health and spirituality. Froese said that respondents who have strong beliefs about their relationship with God reported "significantly better mental health." (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Religion News Service: How religion and high school peers shape when people marry
[5/22/2015]
May 21, 2015
Those who marry in their late teens or early 20s are less likely to finish their education and more likely to earn less money and divorce, and Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, has done research to find out why. His study showed that the religion of adolescents shaped their marriage decisions while controlling for other factors such as income, race, gender, age and geography. Uecker also found that adolescents who are Mormon or conservative Protestant are more likely to marry early than other religious traditions. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

WalletHub (Financial News and Advice): 2015’s Most Diverse Cities in America
[5/15/2015]
May 13, 2015
This article on rapid diversification of America examines economic class, ethno-racial and linguistic diversity in demographic profiles of the 230 most populated U.S. cities. In an “Ask the Experts” question-and-answer session, Charles Tolbert, Ph.D., professor and chair of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, weighs in on the pros and cons of living and working in a diverse city, the relationship between diversity and economic growth and what policy makers can do to harness diversity to spur innovation. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology faculty and research.)
(FULL STORY)

RepublicanAmerican: The God WOD
[4/28/2015]
April 26, 2015
Parishioners often make food for pastors to show their appreciation, with some of the goodies loaded with fat and calories. With long hours, work pressure and unhealthy meals, some 15 percent of clergy are obese, says Baylor sociologist Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate who led a study on clergy obesity. Ferguson, a former pastor, says pastors have some built-in measures they should use to fight obesity, among them observing a Sabbath one day a week, when they do no work, and turning to pastors for support when facing stress. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed the study to national media in January. She covers faculty and research in sociology.)
(FULL STORY)

The Fresno Bee: A clerical challenge: Keeping fit
[4/10/2015]
April 9, 2015
Spiritual leaders often have a hard time finding a balance between work and physical health. According to a research study led by Todd Ferguson, M.A. ’13, a sociology doctoral candidate at Baylor, more than one-third of clergy members are obese. The study found a direct correlation between high work hours/stress and obesity. Week-long sabbaticals were a proven way to decrease a clergy member’s risk of obesity, the study revealed. Ferguson is quoted.
(FULL STORY)

China Daily: Golden oldies have more sex if they make it past their 50th anniversary
[3/23/2015]
March 21, 2015
Married couples who make it past their golden wedding anniversary have a “slight rebound” in frequency of sexual activity, according to a study by sociologists at Baylor University, Louisiana State University and Florida State University. The permanency of the relationship, as well as the emotional investment, may contribute to that, researchers say. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this story to numerous national outlets. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Good Housekeeping: Sex life boost after 50 years of marriage
[3/12/2015]
March 11, 2015
Although a couple’s sex life generally tends to dwindle over time, there’s a slight boost in sex when a marriage reaches the 50th anniversary mark, according to a study by sociology researchers at Baylor University, Louisiana State University and Florida State University. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Healthy Women: Sex After 50: More Than Ever?
[3/6/2015]
March 5, 2015
New research by Baylor University, Louisiana State University and Florida State University found that a slight rebound in sexual activity occurs for couples whose marriages endure longer than half a century. Quoted are Samuel Stroope, Ph.D., former researcher with Baylor who now is an assistant professor of sociology at LSU, and co-author Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Patheos: One Step Forward, But Now What?
[3/5/2015]
March 4, 2015
Column by Jerry Park, Ph.D., associate professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences and an affiliate fellow in the Institute for Studies on Religion, claims that many Americans mistakenly believe that race relations improve naturally over the course of time, a characteristic that plagues many conversations about race relations. Park’s research interests include American race relations, religion, social identities, culture and civic engagement, with a focus on Asian Americans. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Herald-Tribune Health: Passionate Still, After All Those Years
[3/4/2015]
March 3, 2015
A modest rebound in sexual activity occurs for those whose marriages last longer than half a century, according to a study by researchers from LSU, Florida State University and Baylor University. Quoted is former Baylor researcher Samuel Stroope, now an assistant professor of sociology at LSU. Researcher Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was a study co-author. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story originally in the Feb. 23 edition of The New York Times. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Christianity Today: Why Protestant Pastors Need a Sabbath
[2/24/2015]
Feb. 23, 2015
More than a third of U.S. Protestant pastors are obese, with some of the reasons being that pastors are stressed and need to take a Sabbath, according to a study by Todd Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this research story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The New York Times: Married Sex Gets Better in the Golden Years
[2/24/2015]
Feb. 23, 2015
While people in the early years of marriage have sex more frequently, and their sexual activity tapers off over time, a modest rebound occurs for those whose marriages last longer than half a century, according to a study by researchers from Louisiana State University, Florida State University and Baylor University. Quoted is former Baylor researcher Samuel Stroope, now an assistant professor of sociology at LSU. Researcher Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, was a study co-author. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story and arranged interviews with the reporter. Goodrich covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Washington Times: 5 ways to help your friend who's struggling with faith
[2/19/2015]
Feb. 16, 2015
Article mentions research from Baylor University, which found that believing in and praying to God makes people feel happier and healthier. The study was done by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who is quoted in the article. “For many individuals, God is a major source of comfort and strength that makes the world seem less threatening and dangerous,” he said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research story to national media outlets in August 2014. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

The Health Cast: Golden Anniversaries May Bring an Added Special Glow
[2/19/2015]
Feb. 16, 2015
While sexual activity for married couples tapers off over time, a slight rebound occurs for those whose marriages endure longer than half a century, according to new research by Baylor University, Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Quoted are Samuel Stroope, Ph.D., former researcher with Baylor University who now is an assistant professor of sociology at LSU, and co-author Jeremy Uecker, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Fox News: Married? Your sex life will 'rebound' ... in 50 years
[2/17/2015]
Feb. 17, 2015
While most married couples have sex less often over time, sociologists who did a study of 1,656 married adults aged 57 to 85 have found there is a slight uptick in the frequency with which couples have sex after the half-century mark of marriage. The relationship’s permanence, with its accompanying experience and knowledge, may play a role. The study, by researchers from Baylor, Louisiana State University and Florida State University, was published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched and placed this story. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

Deseret News: 5 ways to help your friend who's struggling with faith
[2/17/2015]
Feb. 15, 2015
Article mentions research from Baylor University, which found that believing in and praying to God makes people feel happier and healthier. The study was done by Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, who is quoted in the article. “For many individuals, God is a major source of comfort and strength that makes the world seem less threatening and dangerous,” he said. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, pitched this research story to national media outlets in August 2014. She covers sociology research and faculty.)
(FULL STORY)

University Herald: Religion Could Help Sexual Victims Deal with Distrust
[2/13/2015]
Feb. 4, 2015
Religion can help college women who have been sexually victimized overcome emotional damage and regain trust, according to a Baylor University study titled “Religious Coping: The Role of Religion in Attenuating the Effect of Sexual Victimization of College Women on Trust.” Quoted is Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Black Christian News Network One: Baylor University Study Finds College Women Who Are Sexual Assault Victims Can Find Healing In Religious Groups
[2/12/2015]
Feb. 11, 2015
Theological beliefs and belonging to religious organizations can help college women overcome the emotional damage caused by sexual abuse, a recently published Baylor University study has found. Quoted is study author Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty. She pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Baptist News Global: College sexual assault victims healed by religious communities, chaplains and study say
[2/11/2015]
Feb. 11, 2015
Theological beliefs and belonging to religious organizations can help college women overcome the emotional damage caused by sexual abuse, a recently published Baylor University study has found. Quoted is study author Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and faculty. She pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)

Psych Central: Religion Can Help Women Cope With Sexual Assault
[2/10/2015]
Feb. 4, 2015
Religion can help college women who have been sexually victimized overcome emotional damage and regain trust, according to a Baylor University study titled “Religious Coping: The Role of Religion in Attenuating the Effect of Sexual Victimization of College Women on Trust.” Quoted is Jeffrey Tamburello, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences. (Terry Goodrich, assistant director of Baylor Media Communications, covers sociology research and pitched and placed this story.)
(FULL STORY)


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