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Top News
•  The Stellar Origins of Your Toothpaste
•  The world of physics in 2015
•  NASA Rover Finds Mysterious Methane Emissions on Mars
•  Researchers use real data rather than theory to measure the cosmos
•  Superconductivity record breaks under pressure
•  New Dark Matter Detector Will Be 100 Times More Sensitive to Dark Matter
•  Researchers report possible dark matter signal
•  Quantum Teleportation Reaches Farthest Distance Yet
•  Mars Rover Finds Stronger Potential for Life
•  Quantum computer quest
•  See it, touch it, feel it: Team develops invisible 3-D haptic shape
•  European probe shoots down dark-matter claims
•  Gravity may have saved the universe after the Big Bang
•  How to estimate the magnetic field of an exoplanet
•  Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics
•  GPS satellites might be able to detect elusive dark matter
•  Frigid matter powers first quantum circuits
•  Dark Matter's New Wrinkle: It May Behave Like Wavy Fluid
•  Dark Matter Black Holes Could Be Destroying Stars at the Milky Way’s Center
•  Why a Physics Revolution Might Be on Its Way
•  European satellite could discover thousands of planets in Earth's galaxy
•  String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics
•  New Experiment Aims to Crack Neutrino Mass Mystery
•  Universe may face a darker future
•  Ultracold disappearing act: 'Matter waves' move through one another but never share space
•  Evidence Builds for Dark Matter Explosions at the Milky Way’s Core
•  Can the wave function of an electron be divided and trapped?
•  Chilly Record! Coldest Object on Earth Created in Lab
•  Astronomers Capture First-Ever Image Of A Nova’s Exploding Fireball Stage
•  A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones
•  Historic quantum software is run for the first time
•  3-D map of the adolescent universe
•  Physicists see potential dark matter from the Sun
•  Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
•  Desktop sonic black hole emits Hawking radiation
•  Two new strange and charming particles appear at LHC
•  Texas border town to become next Cape Canaveral
•  New Particle Is Both Matter and Antimatter
•  Deep Space, Branching Molecules, and Life’s Origins?
•  Quantum bits get their first compression
•  Higgs Boson to the World Wide Web: 7 Big Discoveries Made at CERN
•  'Space Bubbles' May Have Doomed Key Afghan War Mission
•  Is Our Universe Really 'Slip Slidin Away'?
•  Quantum Entanglement Creates New State of Matter
•  Photons weave their way through a triple slit
•  Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory
•  Cosmic inflation: BICEP 'underestimated' dust problem
•  Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets
•  Synopsis: More Dark Matter Hints from Cosmic Rays?
•  Surprise! Monster Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy
•  Stalking the Shadow Universe
•  Scattered neutrons could mimic DAMA-LIBRA's 'dark matter' modulation
•  Stalking the Shadow Universe
•  Universe Shouldn't Be Here, According to Higgs Physics
•  Nearby Alien Planet May Be Capable of Supporting Life
•  The First Indirect Detection of Dark Matter
•  Higgs Boson Confirms Reigning Physics Model Yet Again
•  Dark Matter Mystery Deepens
•  Gravitational-wave team admits findings could amount to dust
•  Plasmonic waveguide stops light in its tracks
•  Large Hadron Collider Discovers 'Very Exotic Matter' That Challenges Traditional Physics
•  Physicists link neutron stars to earthbound alloys
•  New material offers angular control over light
•  Lasers to Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox?
•  Big Bang Discovery Opens Doors to the "Multiverse"
•  Big Bang breakthrough announced; gravitational waves detected
•  Paradox Solved? How Information Can Escape from a Black Hole
•  Weird 'Entangled' Light Gives Microscope Sharper Images
•  Population of Known Alien Planets Nearly Doubles as NASA Discovers 715 New Worlds
•  Quantum Dropleton: Weird New Particle Acts Like Liquid
•  Fresh hint of dark matter seen in neutrino search
•  Baby universe rumbled with thunder of Higgs bubbles
•  Dark-Matter Detector to Begin Operations Soon in China
•  Laser Facility Blasts Way to Fusion First
•  No Black Holes Exist, Says Stephen Hawking--At Least Not Like We Think
•  Quasar shines a bright light on cosmic web
•  Deepest galaxy cluster ever pictured by Hubble
•  Scientists can levitate stuff and make it fly around using sound
•  Electron Appears Spherical, Squashing Hopes for New Physics Theories
•  Pulverized Asteroid around Distant Star Was Full of Water
•  Higgs and Englert Are Awarded Nobel Prize in Physics
•  'Higgsogenesis' proposed to explain dark matter
•  A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics
•  Supervolcanoes Rocked Early Mars
•  Hunting quantum gravity in the big bang's echoes
•  Fusion Experiments Inch Closer To Break-Even Goal
•  Curiosity Rover Makes Big Water Discovery in Mars Dirt, a 'Wow Moment'
•  With Earth spinning more slowly, time isn't flying as fast as before
•  Earth Had Oxygen Much Earlier Than Thought
•  Is the universe saddle shaped?
•  Beam Me Up: Bits of Information Teleported Across Computer Chip
•  Doomsday and disembodied brains? Tiny particle rules universe's fate
•  The Drake Equation Revisited
•  First Human Mind-Meld Created
•  Highly sensitive skin-like sensor lights up at touch
•  NASA's WISE telescope poised for second life as asteroid hunter
•  Cosmic Rays May Reveal Damage to Fukushima's Nuclear Reactors
•  Hunt for Intelligent Aliens Focuses on Faint Laser Flashes
•  Sluggish Surprise Found Deep Inside Earth
•  Star Trek Tricorder About to Come True for Medicine

The Stellar Origins of Your Toothpaste
[12/22/2014]
It may only take brushing your teeth to help you feel connected to the cosmos. New research suggests that fluorine, an element in toothpaste, may have been forged billions of years ago inside stars that are now long dead. Fluorine is commonly found in products like toothpaste, refrigerants and pharmaceuticals, and it's the 13th most abundant element on Earth. Astronomers already knew that most elements have a stellar origin, but multiple theories speculate on the birth of cosmic fluorine.The new study suggests that red giant stars may be the main creators of fluorine, and the element likely originated in the high pressure cores of these sun-like stars.
(FULL STORY)

The world of physics in 2015
[12/18/2014]
The science story of 2014, which Physics World picked as its Breakthrough of the Year, simply had to be the successful landing of a man-made probe onto a comet, for the first time. Philae dropped on to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko in November after a 10-year journey aboard the Rosetta craft – triggering scenes of wild jubilation among scientists and engineers at the European Space Agency (ESA), who had lived through a nail-biting final hour as they waited for radio signals to travel the 511 million kilometres from the comet to Earth after its scheduled landing time. Data from the mission are likely to keep astronomers busy for years to come, including signs that water on Earth came not from comets, as was previously thought, but from asteroids. In fact, 2014 was quite a year for space science, with India putting its Mangalyaan craft in orbit around Mars for the first time and Japan launching the country's second asteroid sample-return mission, Hayabusa 2. Further new findings also came in from the Planck mission, confirming the standard model of cosmology and further constraining what dark matter could be. But what of 2105? What will be the key events in physics and who will have taken the accolades in 12 months' time?
(FULL STORY)

NASA Rover Finds Mysterious Methane Emissions on Mars
[12/16/2014]
Is there life on Mars? The answer may be blowing in the wind. NASA’s Curiosity rover has detected fluctuating traces of methane – a possible sign of life – in the thin, cold air of the Martian atmosphere, researchers announced today at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Across Mars and within Gale Crater, where Curiosity is slowly climbing a spire of sedimentary rock called Mount Sharp, the methane exists at a background concentration of slightly less than one part per billion by volume in the atmosphere (ppb). However, for reasons unknown, four times across a period of two months the rover measured much higher methane abundances, at about ten times the background level. Further in-situ studies of the methane emissions could help pin down whether Mars has life, now or in its deep past, though it is unclear when or if those studies will ever take place. The findings are published in the journal Science.
(FULL STORY)

Researchers use real data rather than theory to measure the cosmos
[12/15/2014]
For the first time researchers have measured large distances in the Universe using data, rather than calculations related to general relativity. A research team from Imperial College London and the University of Barcelona has used data from astronomical surveys to measure a standard distance that is central to our understanding of the expansion of the universe. Previously the size of this 'standard ruler' has only been predicted from theoretical models that rely on general relativity to explain gravity at large scales. The new study is the first to measure it using observed data. A standard ruler is an object which consistently has the same physical size so that a comparison of its actual size to its size in the sky will provide a measurement of its distance to earth.
(FULL STORY)

Superconductivity record breaks under pressure
[12/12/2014]
For nearly 30 years, the search for a room-temperature superconductor has focused on exotic materials known as cuprates, which can carry currents without losing energy as heat at temperatures up to 164 Kelvin, or –109 ˚C. But scientists say that they have trumped that record using the common molecule hydrogen sulphide1. When they subjected a tiny sample of that material to pressures close to those inside Earth’s core, the researchers say that it was superconductive at 190 K (–83 ˚C)."If the result is reproduced, it will be quite shocking," says Robert Cava, a solid-state chemist at Princeton University in New Jersey. "It would be a historic discovery."

According to the established theory of superconductivity — dubbed BCS theory after the surnames of its creators, John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and Robert Schrieffer — vibrations in a crystal's atoms can lead electrons to form ‘Cooper pairs’ that can flow through the crystal without resistance. BCS theory was developed in the 1950s, but most physicists believe that it cannot explain superconductivity in cuprates, which was discovered in 1986, or in iron pnictides2, found in 2006.
(FULL STORY)

New Dark Matter Detector Will Be 100 Times More Sensitive to Dark Matter
[12/11/2014]
A team of scientists is building a super sized version of the dark matter detector Lux, called Lux-Zeplin, which will be roughly 100 times more sensitive to dark matter than its predecessor. “What really impressed me was the trip down,” said astrophysicist James Buckley, PhD, speaking of the vertical mile he traveled to get to the site of an underground dark-matter experiment. “You can see you’re moving at a pretty good clip, which, by the way, is three times slower than the cage used to drop when it was a mine. It took us 10 minutes to get down a mile. You just watch the earth flashing by and every once in a while you go past a boarded up tunnel.” The mine is the Homestake Mine, a played-out gold mine in Lead, South Dakota, that has been converted into a warren of underground chambers housing physics experiments that need to be shielded from cosmic radiation.One of these experiments is the Lux detector, designed to detect WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). WIMPs are hypothetical subatomic particles thought to make up dark matter in much the same way that electrons and quarks make up ordinary matter. But compared to other particles, WIMPs are elusive and interact only rarely with ordinary matter, and so far Lux hasn’t found any.
(FULL STORY)

Researchers report possible dark matter signal
[12/11/2014]
Researchers with the European Space Agency say they've detected a strange spike in X-rays coming from two cosmic locations -- the Andromeda Galaxy and the Perseus Cluster. The astronomers think the strange emissions could be the signal of dark matter. If confirmed, it would be first direct evidence of dark matter. Astronomers are confident dark matter exists, but it remains purely hypothetical. Still without it, everything scientists know about the universe falls apart -- their calculations for and modeling of various celestial behaviors wouldn't make any sense. It's estimated that as much as 80 percent of the universe is composed of dark matter -- exerting gravitational forces on its surroundings. Because dark matter neither emits nor absorbs light, it's nearly impossible to observe.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum Teleportation Reaches Farthest Distance Yet
[12/8/2014]
A new distance record has been set in the strange world of quantum teleportation. In a recent experiment, the quantum state (the direction it was spinning) of a light particle instantly traveled 15.5 miles (25 kilometers) across an optical fiber, becoming the farthest successful quantum teleportation feat yet. Advances in quantum teleportation could lead to better Internet and communication security, and get scientists closer to developing quantum computers.
(FULL STORY)

Mars Rover Finds Stronger Potential for Life
[12/8/2014]
For lifeless chemical compounds to organize themselves into something alive, scientists generally agree, three sets of things must be present:
â-  Standing water and an energy source.
â-  Five basic elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, phosphorus and nitrogen.
â-  And time, lots of time.
In its search for environments where life might have started on Mars, the Curiosity rover has found the standing water, the energy and the key elements with the right atomic charges. As a result, scientists have concluded that at least some of the planet must have been habitable long ago. But the period when all conditions were right was counted in hundreds to thousands of years, a very small opening by origin-of-life standards.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE

Some scientists think Gale Crater was once fully buried with sediment and that winds excavated most of it, leaving an 18,000-foot mountain in the middle. (The colors represent different elevations.)Curiosity Rover’s Quest for Clues on MarsDEC. 8, 2014
A painting of early Mars, showing shallow seas across the northern lowlands and weather systems drifting in a denser atmosphere than today's.Looking to Mars to Help Understand Changing ClimatesDEC. 8, 2014
Something to Say About Mars Clockwise from top left: Carl Sagan, President Obama, President Ronald Reagan, Wanda Sykes, Buzz Aldrin, Elon Musk, Orson Welles, Maya Angelou, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Elton John. In the center is a view of a sandstorm on the Martian surface.Mars, ObservedDEC. 8, 2014
First Person: Covering Mars Opened a New WorldDEC. 8, 2014
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity obtained this image using its Left Navigation Camera on the rover's 832 Martian day, called a Sol. Explore Mars for YourselfDEC. 9, 2014
interactive Mars Curiosity Rover TrackerAUG. 5, 2013
That has now changed. John P. Grotzinger of Caltech, the project scientist for the mission, reported at a news conference on Monday that the rover’s yearlong trek to Mount Sharp provided strong new evidence that Gale Crater had large lakes, rivers and deltas, on and off, for millions to tens of millions of years. The geology shows that even when the surface water dried up, plenty of water would have remained underground, he said.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum computer quest
[12/3/2014]
When asked what he likes best about working for Google, physicist John Martinis does not mention the famous massage chairs in the hallways, or the free snacks available just about anywhere at the company's campus in Mountain View, California. Instead, he marvels at Google's tolerance of failure in pursuit of a visionary goal. “If every project they try works,” he says, “they think they aren't trying hard enough.” Martinis reckons that he is going to need that kind of patience. In September, Google recruited him and his 20-member research team from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and set them to work on the notoriously difficult task of building quantum computers: devices that exploit the quirks of the quantum world to carry out calculations that ordinary computers could not finish in the lifetime of the Universe.
(FULL STORY)

See it, touch it, feel it: Team develops invisible 3-D haptic shape
[12/2/2014]
Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3-D haptic shape that can be seen and felt. The research paper, published in the current issue of ACM Transactions on Graphics and which will be presented at this week's SIGGRAPH Asia 2014 conference [3-6 December], demonstrates how a method has been created to produce 3D shapes that can be felt in mid-air. The research, led by Dr Ben Long and colleagues Professor Sriram Subramanian, Sue Ann Seah and Tom Carter from the University of Bristol's Department of Computer Science, could change the way 3D shapes are used. The new technology could enable surgeons to explore a CT scan by enabling them to feel a disease, such as a tumour, using haptic feedback.
The method uses ultrasound, which is focussed onto hands above the device and that can be felt. By focussing complex patterns of ultrasound, the air disturbances can be seen as floating 3D shapes. Visually, the researchers have demonstrated the ultrasound patterns by directing the device at a thin layer of oil so that the depressions in the surface can be seen as spots when lit by a lamp. The system generates an invisible 3D shape that can be added to 3D displays to create something that can be seen and felt. The research team have also shown that users can match a picture of a 3D shape to the shape created by the system.
(FULL STORY)

European probe shoots down dark-matter claims
[12/2/2014]
The first full analysis of the data gathered by the European Space Agency’s Planck spacecraft has resolved some conundrums raised by earlier cosmology studies — but has made the riddle of dark matter more obscure. The Planck team did not yet address a controversy over the gravitational waves from the Big Bang announced in March, but plans to do so in an upcoming study.The space observatory has produced the most detailed full-sky survey yet of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), radiation left over from the explosive birth of the Universe some 13.8 billion years ago. The maps are based on all four years of Planck observations, from launch in 2009 to decommissioning in 2013, and include both the temperature and the polarization of the CMB.
(FULL STORY)

Gravity may have saved the universe after the Big Bang
[11/20/2014]
New research by a team of European physicists could explain why the universe did not collapse immediately after the Big Bang. Studies of the Higgs particle - discovered at CERN in 2012 and responsible for giving mass to all particles - have suggested that the production of Higgs particles during the accelerating expansion of the very early universe (inflation) should have led to instability and collapse.
(FULL STORY)

How to estimate the magnetic field of an exoplanet
[11/20/2014]
Scientists developed a new method which allows to estimate the magnetic field of a distant exoplanet, i.e., a planet, which is located outside the Solar system and orbits a different star. Moreover, they managed to estimate the value of the magnetic moment of the planet HD 209458b.
(FULL STORY)

Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics
[11/19/2014]
The idea that an infinite number of parallel worlds could exist alongside our own is hard to wrap the mind around, but a version of this so-called Many Worlds theory could provide an answer to the controversial idea of quantum mechanics and its many different interpretations. Bill Poirier, a professor of physics at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, proposed a theory that not only assumes parallel worlds exist, but also says their interaction can explain all the quantum mechanics "weirdness" in the observable universe.
(FULL STORY)

GPS satellites might be able to detect elusive dark matter
[11/17/2014]
The everyday use of a GPS device might be to find your way around town or even navigate a hiking trail, but for two physicists, the Global Positioning System might be a tool in directly detecting and measuring dark matter, so far an elusive but ubiquitous form of matter responsible for the formation of galaxies.

Andrei Derevianko, of the University of Nevada, Reno, and his colleague Maxim Pospelov, of the University of Victoria and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada, have proposed a method for a dark-matter search with GPS satellites and other atomic clock networks that compares times from the clocks and looks for discrepancies.
(FULL STORY)

Frigid matter powers first quantum circuits
[11/14/2014]
Move over, electrons – circuits could one day be powered by frigid quantum matter. Ultra-cold clouds of atoms called Bose-Einstein condensates act as a single quantum object, and the goal has been to build "atomtronic" circuits with them. But the condensate's delicate quantum state can easily fall apart. Now Changhyun Ryu and Malcolm Boshier of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico have found a way to do it. Their circuits are built from two laser beams, one that creates a horizontal sheet of light to act as a circuit board, and another vertical laser that traces out the path of the circuit. The condensate, which is made from around 4000 cooled rubidium atoms, is trapped inside the beams by the same forces used to create optical tweezers, which can manipulate particles on a small scale. The condensate is set in motion by creating a slightly sloped path. The team ran the condensate along straight lines, in a circle and through a Y junction – all essential components of a circuit. Since the circuits are just made from light, they can be reconfigured as the atoms are moving, letting you squeeze a complex circuit into a small space, says Boshier.
(FULL STORY)

Dark Matter's New Wrinkle: It May Behave Like Wavy Fluid
[11/12/2014]
The mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the matter in the universe may behave more like wavy fluids than solid particles, helping to explain the shapes of galaxies, a new study suggests. Dark matter is one of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos. It is thought to be an invisible and mostly intangible substance that makes up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. The scientific consensus is that dark matter is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts very weakly with all the known forces of the universe and is mostly only detectable via the gravitational pull it exerts. However, what kind of particle dark matter consists of remains unknown.
(FULL STORY)

Dark Matter Black Holes Could Be Destroying Stars at the Milky Way’s Center
[11/10/2014]
Dark matter may have turned spinning stars into black holes near the center of our galaxy, researchers say. There, scientists expected to see plenty of the dense, rotating stars called pulsars, which are fairly common throughout the Milky Way. Despite numerous searches, however, only one has been found, giving rise to the so-called “missing pulsar problem.” A possible explanation, according to a new study, is that dark matter has built up inside these stars, causing the pulsars to collapse into black holes. (These black holes would be smaller than the supermassive black hole that is thought to lurk at the very heart of the galaxy.)
(FULL STORY)

Why a Physics Revolution Might Be on Its Way
[11/9/2014]

(FULL STORY)

European satellite could discover thousands of planets in Earth's galaxy
[11/6/2014]
A recently launched European satellite could reveal tens of thousands of new planets within the next few years, and provide scientists with a far better understanding of the number, variety and distribution of planets in our galaxy, according to research published today.Researchers from Princeton University and Lund University in Sweden calculated that the observational satellite Gaia could detect as many as 21,000 exoplanets, or planets outside of Earth's solar system, during its five-year mission. If extended to 10 years, Gaia could detect as many as 70,000 exoplanets, the researchers report. The researchers' assessment is accepted in the Astrophysical Journal and was published Nov. 6 in advance-of-print on arXiv, a preprint database run by Cornell University.
(FULL STORY)

String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics
[11/3/2014]
Two USC researchers have proposed a link between string field theory and quantum mechanics that could open the door to using string field theory — or a broader version of it, called M-theory — as the basis of all physics. This could solve the mystery of where quantum mechanics comes from,” said Itzhak Bars, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences professor and lead author of the paper.

Bars collaborated with Dmitry Rychkov, his Ph.D. student at USC. The paper was published online on Oct. 27 by the journal Physics Letters.

Rather than use quantum mechanics to validate string field theory, the researchers worked backwards and used string field theory to try to validate quantum mechanics.

In their paper, which reformulated string field theory in a clearer language, Bars and Rychov showed that a set of fundamental quantum mechanical principles known as “commutation rules’’ that may be derived from the geometry of strings joining and splitting. “Our argument can be presented in bare bones in a hugely simplified mathematical structure,” Bars said. “The essential ingredient is the assumption that all matter is made up of strings and that the only possible interaction is joining/splitting as specified in their version of string field theory.”
(FULL STORY)

New Experiment Aims to Crack Neutrino Mass Mystery
[11/4/2014]
Neutrinos are everywhere in the universe, but we cannot see them or feel them and can almost never stop them. They stream through our bodies by the trillions every second, flitting through the spaces between our atoms with nary a collision. These ghostly particles were created in abundance during the big bang, and stars like the sun pump out more all the time. Yet for all their plentitude, neutrinos may be the most mysterious particles in the cosmos.

For decades physicists thought neutrinos weighed nothing, and they were shocked in 1998 to discover that the particles do have very small, but nonzero, masses. Exactly how much mass they have is still unknown. The larger question, however, is why they have mass at all.

The unexpected mass of neutrinos represents a deviation from the reigning laws of particle physics, called the Standard Model, so teasing out the reason for this mass could lead the way to a deeper and fuller explanation of the particles that make up our world. “It’s really the first crack in the Standard Model in quite some time,” says Indiana University physicist Mark Messier, “and there’s a lot of interest to try to pull that crack open and see what’s going on there.” Furthermore, neutrinos seem to be at the heart of a larger mystery: the question of why we live in a universe made of matter and not antimatter. The two types of stuff should have been created in roughly equal measures at the beginning of time, but somehow matter won out. Scientists suspect that solving the neutrino mass problem may help reveal why that is.
(FULL STORY)

Universe may face a darker future
[11/4/2014]
New research offers a novel insight into the nature of dark matter and dark energy and what the future of our Universe might be. Researchers in Portsmouth and Rome have found hints that dark matter, the cosmic scaffolding on which our Universe is built, is being slowly erased, swallowed up by dark energy. The findings appear in the journal Physical Review Letters, published by the American Physical Society. In the journal cosmologists at the Universities of Portsmouth and Rome, argue that the latest astronomical data favours a dark energy that grows as it interacts with dark matter, and this appears to be slowing the growth of structure in the cosmos.
(FULL STORY)

Ultracold disappearing act: 'Matter waves' move through one another but never share space
[11/2/2014]
A disappearing act was the last thing Rice University physicist Randy Hulet expected to see in his ultracold atomic experiments, but that is what he and his students produced by colliding pairs of Bose Einstein condensates (BECs) that were prepared in special states called solitons. Hulet's team documented the strange phenomenon in a new study published online this week in the journal Nature Physics.
(FULL STORY)

Evidence Builds for Dark Matter Explosions at the Milky Way’s Core
[10/28/2014]
So far, dark matter has evaded scientists’ best attempts to find it. Astronomers know the invisible stuff dominates our universe and tugs gravitationally on regular matter, but they do not know what it is made of. Since 2009, however, suspicious gamma-ray light radiating from the Milky Way’s core—where dark matter is thought to be especially dense—has intrigued researchers. Some wonder if the rays might have been emitted in explosions caused by colliding particles of dark matter. Now a new gamma-ray signal, in combination with those already detected, offers further evidence that this might be the case.
(FULL STORY)

Can the wave function of an electron be divided and trapped?
[10/29/2014]
Electrons are elementary particles — indivisible, unbreakable. But new research suggests the electron's quantum state — the electron wave function — can be separated into many parts. That has some strange implications for the theory of quantum mechanics.
(FULL STORY)

Chilly Record! Coldest Object on Earth Created in Lab
[10/29/2014]
chunk of copper became the coldest cubic meter (35.3 cubic feet) on Earth when researchers chilled it to 6 millikelvins, or six-thousandths of a degree above absolute zero (0 Kelvin). This is the closest a substance of this mass and volume has ever come to absolute zero. Researchers put the 880-lb. (400 kilograms) copper cube inside a container called a cryostat that is specially designed to keep items extremely cold. This is the first cryostat built that is capable of keeping substances so close to absolute zero.
(FULL STORY)

Astronomers Capture First-Ever Image Of A Nova’s Exploding Fireball Stage
[10/27/2014]
Observations of the expanding thermonuclear fireball from a nova that erupted last year have resulted in the first ever images of an exploding star during this stage and revealed how the ejected material’s structure evolves as the gas cools and expands, researchers from Georgia State University reported on Sunday. The observations, which were conducted by researchers working at GSU’s Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA), reveal that the expansion is more complex than previous models had predicted. Lead author Gail Schaefer, an astronomer working at Georgia State, and 37 colleagues representing 17 institutions report their findings in the latest edition of the journal Nature.
(FULL STORY)

A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones
[10/24/2014]
The bizarre behaviour of the quantum world — with objects existing in two places simultaneously and light behaving as either waves or particles — could result from interactions between many 'parallel' everyday worlds, a new theory suggests. “It is a fundamental shift from previous quantum interpretations,” says Howard Wiseman, a theoretical quantum physicist at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, who together with his colleagues describes the idea in Physical Review X.
(FULL STORY)

Historic quantum software is run for the first time
[10/23/2014]
The first piece of software to show the potential of quantum computing has finally been run on a real machine, 20 years after it was initially dreamed up. Although it doesn't do anything useful on its own, implementing the algorithm could lead to more practical computers powered by the strange properties of quantum mechanics. Quantum computers should be much faster than ordinary ones, but only at tasks for which there is a quantum algorithm – software that takes advantage of the computer's quantum nature. Without these algorithms, quantum computers are just regular computers that are much harder to build. One of the best-known pieces of quantum software is Shor's algorithm, which factorises large numbers into their prime components – a notoriously slow and difficult problem to solve classically. Shor's algorithm has been run in a limited way using photons sent through the air and on silicon chips – but a full-blown quantum computer capable of running it could threaten online encryption, which relies on large primes.
(FULL STORY)

3-D map of the adolescent universe
[10/23/2014]
Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see.
(FULL STORY)

Physicists see potential dark matter from the Sun
[10/17/2014]
An analysis of 12 years’ worth of telescope data has found a signal that some physicists think could be the first detection of dark matter1. Astronomers have found variations in the stream of X-rays seen by a European Space Agency observatory that matches what would be expected if axions — a hypothetical dark-matter particle — were interacting with Earth’s magnetic field. Dark matter is the name given to the substance thought to make up some 85% of all the matter in the Universe. It is ‘dark’ because its presence can be inferred from the pull it exerts on stars in the Universe, but it has evaded all attempts so far to detect it convincingly. If confirmed, the axion finding would be a huge discovery. The study leader, astronomer George Fraser of the University of Leicester, UK, died just two days after he and his co-authors submitted the paper for publication. The study was Fraser’s “most astonishing swan song”, wrote Andy Lawrence, an astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy in Edinburgh, UK, in his blog the e-Astronomer.
(FULL STORY)

Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
[10/21/2014]
Laser physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam that is bright around the edges and dark in its centre.
It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam and moved particles one fifth of a millimetre in diameter a distance of up to 20 centimetres, around 100 times further than previous experiments.
(FULL STORY)

Desktop sonic black hole emits Hawking radiation
[10/12/2014]
A model black hole that traps sound instead of light has been caught emitting quantum particles, thought to be the analogue of the theoretical Hawking radiation. The effect may be the first time that a lab-based black hole has created Hawking particles in the same way expected from real black holes.
(FULL STORY)

Two new strange and charming particles appear at LHC
[10/8/2014]
Two new particles have been discovered by the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland. One of them has a combination of properties that has never been observed before. The particles, named DS3*(2860)– and DS1*(2860)–, are about three times as massive as protons. Physicists analysed LHCb observations of an energy peak that had been spotted in 2006 by the BaBar experiment at Stanford University in California, but whose cause was still unknown.
(FULL STORY)

Texas border town to become next Cape Canaveral
[10/6/2014]

(FULL STORY)

New Particle Is Both Matter and Antimatter
[10/2/2014]
Researchers see signature of “Majorana particles” inside superconducting iron.

Since the 1930s scientists have been searching for particles that are simultaneously matter and antimatter. Now physicists have found strong evidence for one such entity inside a superconducting material. The discovery could represent the first so-called Majorana particle, and may help researchers encode information for quantum computers.

Physicists think that every particle of matter has an antimatter counterpart with equal mass but opposite charge. When matter meets its antimatter equivalent, the two annihilate one another. But some particles might be their own antimatter partners, according to a 1937 prediction by Italian physicist Ettore Majorana. For the first time researchers say they have imaged one of these Majorana particles, and report their findings in the October 3 Science.
(FULL STORY)

Deep Space, Branching Molecules, and Life’s Origins?
[9/30/2014]
If biologically important organic molecules like amino acids could form in interstellar space, the implications would be enormous. On the Earth we find plenty of amino acid species inside certain types of meteorites, so at a minimum these compounds can form during the assembly of a proto-stellar, proto-planetary system (at least this one) and end up intact on the surface of rocky planets. The implication is that there may be a ‘starter-mix’ of pre-biotic chemistry for young planets that comes from off-world, and which could play a role in the origins of life.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum bits get their first compression
[9/29/2014]
Without algorithms that compress data to encode information into fewer bits, hard drives would clog up and Internet traffic would slow to a snail's pace. Now, a group of physicists in Canada has shown for the first time that it is possible to compress the kind of data that might be used in the computers of tomorrow — known as quantum bits, or qubits.

Quantum computers promise to perform certain tasks, such as cracking encryption keys or searching databases, exponentially faster than conventional computers can. Such pace is possible in part because while in a classical computer a bit of information can be either a 0 or a 1, a quantum computer can store the information as both values simultaneously, so that qubits can exist in a wide range of 'superpositions' of the two states.
(FULL STORY)

Higgs Boson to the World Wide Web: 7 Big Discoveries Made at CERN
[9/29/2014]
The world's biggest atom smasher, where monumental discoveries such as the detection of the once-elusive Higgs boson particle and the creation of antimatter have occurred, is celebrating its 60th anniversary today (Sept. 29).
Founded in 1954, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, located near Geneva on the French-Swiss border, contains some of the largest and most advanced particle accelerators in the world. In honor of the lab's anniversary, here are a few of the greatest discoveries made at CERN over the past six decades.
(FULL STORY)

'Space Bubbles' May Have Doomed Key Afghan War Mission
[9/27/2014]
Twelve years ago, a U.S. military rescue mission in Afghanistan went horribly wrong. A Chinook helicopter carrying U.S. troops failed to receive a crucial radio message and was shot down over the snow-covered peak of Takur Ghar.
But the radio failure was not caused by malfunctioning equipment. Instead, a giant, 62-mile-long (100 kilometers) "plasma bubble" made up of clouds of electrically charged particles was responsible for the communication blackout, new research suggests.
(FULL STORY)

Is Our Universe Really 'Slip Slidin Away'?
[9/26/2014]
Ok. Some corners of the news media have headlined a comment made by Stephen Hawkings about Hawkings says Higgs Boson could destroy the universe. To their credit, the stories you read are presented tongue-in-cheek with the disclaimer that it is really unlikely that this will happen. But if it does, our familiar universe will simply wink-out and be replaced by another kind of universe based upon different laws. Presumably the transition will be instantaneous and you will not feel a thing.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum Entanglement Creates New State of Matter
[9/22/2014]
Half a million ultracold atoms were linked together in the first-ever “macroscopic spin singlet” state.Physicists have used a quantum connection Albert Einstein called “spooky action at a distance” to link 500,000 atoms together so that their fates were entwined. The atoms were connected via “entanglement,” which means an action performed on one atom will reverberate on any atom entangled with it, even if the particles are far apart. The huge cloud of entangled atoms is the first “macroscopic spin singlet,” a new state of matter that was predicted but never before realized.

Entanglement is a consequence of the strange probabilistic rules of quantum mechanics and seems to permit an eerie instantaneous connection over long distances that defies the laws of our macroscopic world (hence Einstein’s “spooky” remark). A spin singlet is one form of entanglement where multiple particles’ spins—their intrinsic angular momentum—add up to 0, meaning the system has zero total angular momentum.
(FULL STORY)

Photons weave their way through a triple slit
[9/25/2014]
A flaw in how quantum-interference experiments are interpreted has been quantified for the first time by a team of physicists in India. Using the "path integral" formulation of quantum mechanics, the team calculated the interference pattern created when electrons or photons travel through a set of three slits. It found that non-classical paths – in which a particle can weave its way through several slits – must be considered along with the conventional quantum superposition of three direct paths (one through each of the slits). The team says the effect should be measurable in experiments involving microwave photons, and that the work could also provide insights into potential sources of decoherence in some quantum-information systems.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory
[9/12/2014]
Quantum teleportation1 is a cornerstone of quantum information science due to its essential role in important tasks such as the long-distance transmission of quantum information using quantum repeaters2, 3. This requires the efficient distribution of entanglement between remote nodes of a network4. Here, we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the polarization state of a telecom-wavelength photon onto the state of a solid-state quantum memory. Entanglement is established between a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal storing a single photon that is polarization-entangled with a flying telecom-wavelength photon5, 6. The latter is jointly measured with another flying polarization qubit to be teleported, which heralds the teleportation. The fidelity of the qubit retrieved from the memory is shown to be greater than the maximum fidelity achievable without entanglement, even when the combined distances travelled by the two flying qubits is 25â€...km of standard optical fibre. Our results demonstrate the possibility of long-distance quantum networks with solid-state resources.
(FULL STORY)

Cosmic inflation: BICEP 'underestimated' dust problem
[9/22/2014]
One of the biggest scientific claims of the year has received another set-back. In March, the US BICEP team said it had found a pattern on the sky left by the rapid expansion of space just fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The astonishing assertion was countered quickly by others who thought the group may have underestimated the confounding effects of dust in our own galaxy. That explanation has now been boosted by a new analysis from the European Space Agency's (Esa) Planck satellite. In a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server, Planck's researchers find that the part of the sky being observed by the BICEP team contained significantly more dust than it had assumed. This new information does not mean the original claim is now dead. Not immediately, anyway.
(FULL STORY)

Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets
[6/3/2014]
There are some 100 million other places in the Milky Way galaxy that could support complex life, report a group of university astronomers in the journal Challenges. They have developed a new computation method to examine data from planets orbiting other stars in the universe. Their study provides the first quantitative estimate of the number of worlds in our galaxy that could harbor life above the microbial level.
(FULL STORY)

Synopsis: More Dark Matter Hints from Cosmic Rays?
[9/21/2014]
Excitement still surrounds a possible hint of dark matter in an unexpected excess of cosmic-ray antielectrons (positrons) relative to electrons. A new set of data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station confirms the positron excess and provides the most accurate measurement to date of the shape of both the electron and positron spectra. The analysis reveals that the positron flux is significantly different from the electron flux above 30 GeV in energy, which suggests that positrons and electrons have a different origin.

Cosmic rays are predominantly protons and other nuclei, but electrons and positrons make up part of the mix. Standard astrophysical models of interstellar particle collisions predict that, in cosmic rays, the fraction of positrons relative to electrons should decrease with energy. However, recent observations from satellites (e.g., PAMELA and Fermi) and from AMS have shown that the positron fraction actually increases with energy.

The AMS experiment, which has a large permanent magnet that allows particle discrimination, has been collecting data since May 2011. Out of 41 billion detection events, the AMS collaboration has identified 580,000 positrons and 9.2 million electrons (50% more than in their previous data release, see 3 April 2013 Viewpoint). Thanks to the additional data, they were able to extend their measurements of the positron flux up to 500 GeV and, similarly, of the electron flux up to 700 GeV. The high-precision data reveal that both spectra change their slope at around 30 GeV but behave differently towards higher energies: the positron flux drops off much more slowly than the electron flux. One possible explanation for this spectral difference is that the positrons are being created in annihilations of dark matter particles. The authors say data at higher energy will be needed to confirm a dark matter origin.

This research is published in Physical Review Letters.
(FULL STORY)

Surprise! Monster Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy
[9/17/2014]
Astronomers have just discovered the smallest known galaxy that harbors a huge, supermassive black hole at its core. The relatively nearby dwarf galaxy may house a supermassive black hole at its heart equal in mass to about 21 million suns. The discovery suggests that supermassive black holes may be far more common than previously thought.
(FULL STORY)

Stalking the Shadow Universe
[7/16/2014]
For centuries people have found meaning — or thought they did — in what they could see in the sky, the shapes of the constellations echoing old myths, the sudden feathery intrusion of comets, the regular dances of the planets, the chains of galaxies, spanning unfathomable distances of time and space.

Since the 1980s, however, astronomers have been forced to confront the possibility that most of the universe is invisible, and that all the glittering chains of galaxies are no more substantial, no more reliable guides to physical reality, than greasepaint on the face of a clown.

The brute mathematical truth is that atoms, the stuff of stars, you and me, make up only 5 percent of the universe by weight. A quarter of it is made of mysterious particles known as dark matter, and the remaining 70 percent a mysterious form of energy called dark energy. Physicists theorize that dark matter could be exotic particles left over from the Big Bang. They don’t know what it is, but they can deduce that dark matter is there by its gravitational effect on the things they can see. If Newton’s laws of gravity held over cosmic distances, huge amounts of more matter than we can see were needed to provide the gravitational glue to keep clusters of galaxies from flying apart, and to keep the stars swirling around in galaxies at high speed.
(FULL STORY)

Scattered neutrons could mimic DAMA-LIBRA's 'dark matter' modulation
[7/17/2014]
For the last 16 years, researchers at the DAMA/LIBRA experiment in Italy have seen a controversial annual oscillation in the signal from their dark-matter detector. This type of variation would be seen if the Milky Way galaxy was wreathed in a "halo" of dark matter. But apart from the CoGENT dark-matter experiment in the US, no other dark-matter searches have seen a similar effect. Now, a physicist at Durham University in the UK has proposed an alternative source for the modulation in the form of neutrons, which are knocked out of atoms by muons and neutrinos scattering in the rock or shielding material around DAMA/LIBRA.
(FULL STORY)

Stalking the Shadow Universe
[7/16/2014]
For centuries people have found meaning — or thought they did — in what they could see in the sky, the shapes of the constellations echoing old myths, the sudden feathery intrusion of comets, the regular dances of the planets, the chains of galaxies, spanning unfathomable distances of time and space.
Since the 1980s, however, astronomers have been forced to confront the possibility that most of the universe is invisible, and that all the glittering chains of galaxies are no more substantial, no more reliable guides to physical reality, than greasepaint on the face of a clown.
(FULL STORY)

Universe Shouldn't Be Here, According to Higgs Physics
[6/23/2014]
The universe shouldn't exist — at least according to a new theory. Modeling of conditions soon after the Big Bang suggests the universe should have collapsed just microseconds after its explosive birth, the new study suggests.
(FULL STORY)

Nearby Alien Planet May Be Capable of Supporting Life
[6/26/2014]
A newfound alien world might be able to support life — and it's just a stone's throw from Earth in the cosmic scheme of things. An international team of astronomers has discovered an exoplanet in the star Gliese 832's "habitable zone" — the just-right range of distances that could allow liquid water to exist on a world's surface. The planet, known as Gliese 832c, lies just 16 light-years from Earth. (For perspective, the Milky Way galaxy is about 100,000 light-years wide; the closest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light-years away.)
(FULL STORY)

The First Indirect Detection of Dark Matter
[6/17/2014]
Dark matter is one of the universe's most befuddling, and elusive, components. It could make up roughly a quarter of the universe's total mass and energy, yet no one knows for sure because no one has actually seen it. Well, it may be showing itself at last. nasa's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has recorded high-energy gamma-ray light emanating from the center of the Milky Way that fits well with dark matter predictions. “I would consider it currently the most exciting signal that we have,” said physicist Rafael Lang of Purdue University, who was not involved in the study, at the American Physical Society's meeting in April in Savannah, Ga. If the light were truly caused by dark matter, it would be the first indirect detection of the particles that make up this shadowy substance.
(FULL STORY)

Higgs Boson Confirms Reigning Physics Model Yet Again
[6/23/2014]
For a subatomic particle that remained hidden for nearly 50 years, the Higgs boson is turning out to be remarkably well behaved. Yet more evidence from the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, confirms that the Higgs boson particle, thought to explain why other particles have mass, acts just as predicted by the Standard Model, the dominant physics theory that describes the menagerie of subatomic particles that make up the universe.
(FULL STORY)

Dark Matter Mystery Deepens
[6/17/2014]
New results from the particle detector attached outside the International Space Station show something else beside ordinary matter is generating cosmic rays, the lead researcher said Tuesday.
(FULL STORY)

Gravitational-wave team admits findings could amount to dust
[6/20/2014]
Astronomers who announced in March that they had evidence of waves originating from the Big Bang have adopted a more cautious stance as they publish their results in a peer-reviewed journal — just as new independent data cast additional doubt on the original findings. Settlement for UCLA chemist over student death China rover scans deep into the Moon's geological history BICEP2 team concedes problems with gravitational- wave signal
In a paper published on 19 June in Physical Review Letters1, the BICEP2 collaboration, named after the South Pole telescope they used to look at a patch of the microwave sky, acknowledges that the foreground effect of dust in the Milky Way may account for a larger fraction than previously estimated — and possibly all — of what had appeared to be a signal from the dawn of time.
(FULL STORY)

Plasmonic waveguide stops light in its tracks
[4/14/2014]
A simple, solid-state waveguide that can "stop" light has been proposed by physicists in the UK. The researchers say that their device – which has yet to be built in the lab – would be straightforward to create and could be used as an interface between electronic and optical circuits. The waveguide could also lead to the development of new lasers and molecular-imaging systems.
(FULL STORY)

Large Hadron Collider Discovers 'Very Exotic Matter' That Challenges Traditional Physics
[4/14/2014]
Scientists have discovered a new "very exotic" type of matter that challenges the traditional model of particle physics. Using the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) Collaboration at Cern in Geneva, the New York scientists say they have confirmed the discovery of exotic hadrons which cannot be classified using the traditional quark model – a classification scheme for hadrons.
(FULL STORY)

Physicists link neutron stars to earthbound alloys
[3/26/2014]
Neutron stars could share some unlikely similarities with metallic alloys here on Earth. That's the conclusion of two physicists in Scandinavia, who have carried out calculations that reveal that the nuclei and neutrons in the outer crust of these stars play a similar role to the different metals in an alloy. The finding could provide insights into some observable properties of neutron stars, including gamma-ray bursts, rotational glitches and gravitational waves.
(FULL STORY)

New material offers angular control over light
[3/27/2014]
A new material that filters light according to its direction of travel has been developed by physicists in the US and China. Made of alternating layers of two different transparent materials, the structure is just 8 μm thick and offers a new and extremely simple way of controlling the direction in which light propagates. According to its inventors, the material could be used in a range of applications, from photography to solar energy.
(FULL STORY)

Lasers to Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox?
[3/25/2014]
In an effort to help solve the black hole information paradox that has immersed theoretical physics in an ocean of soul searching for the past two years, two researchers have thrown their hats into the ring with a novel solution: Lasers.
(FULL STORY)

Big Bang Discovery Opens Doors to the "Multiverse"
[3/18/2014]
Bored with your old dimensions—up and down, right and left, and back and forth? So tiresome. Take heart, folks. The latest news from Big Bang cosmologists offers us some relief from our humdrum four-dimensional universe. Gravitational waves rippling through the aftermath of the cosmic fireball, physicists suggest, point to us inhabiting a multiverse, a universe filled with many universes.
(FULL STORY)

Big Bang breakthrough announced; gravitational waves detected
[3/18/2014]
There's no way for us to know exactly what happened some 13.8 billion years ago, when our universe burst onto the scene. But scientists announced Monday a breakthrough in understanding how our world as we know it came to be.
If the discovery holds up to scrutiny, it's evidence of how the universe rapidly expanded less than a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang
(FULL STORY)

Paradox Solved? How Information Can Escape from a Black Hole
[3/4/2014]
Every black hole conceals a secret — the quantum remains of the star from which it formed, say a group of scientists, who also predict that these stars can later emerge once the black hole evaporates. The researchers call these objects "Planck stars" and believe that they could solve a very important question in modern physics: the information paradox, or the question of what happens to information contained in matter that falls into a black hole. The idea could also finally reconcile quantum mechanics and Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that describes gravity, thus showing how a theory of quantum gravity might solve longstanding puzzles in the world of physics.
(FULL STORY)

Weird 'Entangled' Light Gives Microscope Sharper Images
[3/3/2014]
The first microscope that uses the eerie trick of quantum entanglement to increase its sensitivity has been developed by Japanese researchers. The new tool relies on a weird principle of quantum mechanics, in which two particles can become entangled so that even when separated by large distances, say light-years, they are intimately connected. Using such entangled photons, or particles of light, the microscope reveals things that are completely transparent, visualizing them in a much better quality than could be done with ordinary light.
(FULL STORY)

Population of Known Alien Planets Nearly Doubles as NASA Discovers 715 New Worlds
[2/26/2014]
NASA's Kepler space telescope has discovered more than 700 new exoplanets, nearly doubling the current number of confirmed alien worlds. The 715 newfound planets, which scientists announced today (Feb. 26), boost the total alien-world tally to between 1,500 and 1,800, depending on which of the five main extrasolar planet discovery catalogs is used. The Kepler mission is responsible for more than half of these finds, hauling in 961 exoplanets to date, with thousands more candidates awaiting confirmation by follow-up investigations.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum Dropleton: Weird New Particle Acts Like Liquid
[2/26/2014]
Physicists can spend years seeking new particles to illuminate aspects of nature's laws, but an international team decided instead to make their own particles. Called a dropleton or quantum droplet, the newly created "particle" is actually a short-lived cluster of electrons and positive charges called "holes." Like other so-called quasiparticles, dropletons act like single particles.
(FULL STORY)

Fresh hint of dark matter seen in neutrino search
[2/25/2014]
Flashes of X-rays from crowded galaxy clusters could be the long-awaited sign that we have found particles of dark matter – the elusive substance thought to make up the bulk of all matter in the universe. If the results stand up, dark matter would consist of ghostly particles called "sterile" neutrinos. These tantalising particles would be the first kind found beyond the standard set known to science.
(FULL STORY)

Baby universe rumbled with thunder of Higgs bubbles
[2/19/2014]
Bubbles popping in the hot particle soup that filled the early universe may have created a rumble like thunder, and it is possible that we can detect the echoes today. Finding them could help solve some mysteries of the Higgs boson and maybe lead to new physics.
(FULL STORY)

Dark-Matter Detector to Begin Operations Soon in China
[2/13/2014]
China is entering the race to detect mysterious dark matter in a big way, with a huge facility in Sichuan province set to begin collecting data in the coming weeks.
The $8 million PandaX (Particle and Astrophysical Xenon) experiment -- which lies 7,874 feet (2,400 meters) underground, inside a mountain made of marble -- will be up and running early this year, IEEE Spectrum reported recently on Discovery News. When it comes online, PandaX will join the world's other subterranean dark-matter experiments, such as the XENON project in Italy and the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) effort in South Dakota.
(FULL STORY)

Laser Facility Blasts Way to Fusion First
[2/12/2014]
Energy researchers report a tenfold increase in power from laser fusion experiments in a study released Wednesday, a step closer to someday bottling the power of the sun. The report from the U.S. Department of Energy's $3.5 billion National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore (California) National Laboratory comes after a decade of disappointments. (See: "Fusion Energy Quest Faces Boundaries of Budget, Science.") The report offers encouragement to long-frustrated efforts to harness fusion, which provides the punch in hydrogen bombs, as a plentiful source of pollution-free nuclear energy.
(FULL STORY)

No Black Holes Exist, Says Stephen Hawking--At Least Not Like We Think
[1/28/2014]
Black holes do not exist--at least, not as we know them, says renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, potentially provoking a rethink of one of space's most mysterious objects.

A new study from Hawking also says that black holes may not possess "firewalls," destructive belts of radiation that some researchers have proposed would incinerate anything that passes through them but others scientists deem an impossibility.
(FULL STORY)

Quasar shines a bright light on cosmic web
[1/23/2014]
The first view of part of a filament of the "cosmic web" might have been glimpsed by astronomers, thanks to a quasar acting like a torch to illuminate the gas. The observations, made by an international team of researchers, could be the first evidence of the long-predicted large-scale structure of matter in our universe - a network of filaments thought to connect all matter, including galaxies and gas clouds.
(FULL STORY)

Deepest galaxy cluster ever pictured by Hubble
[1/8/2014]
The "deepest ever" image of a group of galaxies - "Pandora's Cluster" - has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.
(FULL STORY)

Scientists can levitate stuff and make it fly around using sound
[1/14/2014]
Japanese scientists have made hundreds of tiny plastic balls float around like miniature spaceships.
(FULL STORY)

Electron Appears Spherical, Squashing Hopes for New Physics Theories
[11/11/2013]
Scientists are unanimous that their current theory of physics is incomplete. Yet every effort to expose a deeper theory has so far disappointed. Now the most sensitive test yet of the shape of an electron--a property that could expose underlying "new physics"--has failed to find hints of anything novel. The finding rules out a number of favored ideas for extending physics, including some versions of a popular idea called supersymmetry.
(FULL STORY)

Pulverized Asteroid around Distant Star Was Full of Water
[10/10/2013]

(FULL STORY)

Higgs and Englert Are Awarded Nobel Prize in Physics
[10/8/2013]
Two theoretical physicists who suggested that an invisible ocean of energy suffusing space is responsible for the mass and diversity of the particles in the universe won the Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday morning. They are Peter Higgs, 84, of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, and François Englert, 80, of the University Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium.
(FULL STORY)

'Higgsogenesis' proposed to explain dark matter
[10/4/2013]
A key riddle in cosmology may be answered by the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson -- now a leading contender for the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on 8 October. Two physicists suggest that the Higgs had a key role in the early Universe, producing the observed difference between the number of matter and antimatter particles and determining the density of the mysterious dark matter that makes up five-sixths of the matter in the Universe.
(FULL STORY)

A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics
[9/17/2013]
Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.
(FULL STORY)

Supervolcanoes Rocked Early Mars
[10/2/2013]
The planets of the inner solar system--Earth, Mars, Venus, and Mercury--started their lives as boiling-hot balls of rock, which cooled to feature thin crusts battered by asteroid and comet impacts. On Mars, that early crust was perhaps also punctured by supersize volcanoes with calderas more than 30 miles (50 kilometers) wide, a newly identified kind of volcanism on the red planet.
(FULL STORY)

Hunting quantum gravity in the big bang's echoes
[9/30/2013]
Uniting gravity with its quantum nemesis might take a detector the size of the universe. So say two physicists who think they have found a way to resolve one of the biggest conflicts in modern physics using high-resolution maps of the infant cosmos.
(FULL STORY)

Fusion Experiments Inch Closer To Break-Even Goal
[9/30/2013]
Fusion energy has proven an elusive goal -- a running joke is that humanity is 20 years away from a practical power plant, and has been for 60 years.That could be changing, said John Edwards, associate director for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density science of the National Ignition Facility. In a recent piece published in the journal Physics of Plasmas, Edwards said NIF scientists are getting closer to reactions that produce more energy than they need to get going, and added that the obstacles to realizing nuclear fusion involve engineering problems rather than basic physics.
(FULL STORY)

Curiosity Rover Makes Big Water Discovery in Mars Dirt, a 'Wow Moment'
[9/26/2013]
Future Mars explorers may be able to get all the water they need out of the red dirt beneath their boots, a new study suggests.
(FULL STORY)

With Earth spinning more slowly, time isn't flying as fast as before
[9/25/2013]
Don't forget to set your clocks ahead two thousandths of a second before you go to sleep tonight. Same thing goes for bedtime tomorrow. And every day after that, because that is how much slower the Earth turns on its axis each day now than it did a century ago.
(FULL STORY)

Earth Had Oxygen Much Earlier Than Thought
[9/25/2013]
Oxygen may have filled Earth's atmosphere hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought, suggesting that sunlight-dependent life akin to modern plants evolved very early in Earth's history, a new study finds.
(FULL STORY)

Is the universe saddle shaped?
[9/19/2013]
The geometry of the universe is "open" or negatively curved like a saddle, according to a new model proposed by researchers in Europe who have studied anomalies in the cosmic microwave background radiation. The anomalies were first detected by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in 2004 and were confirmed earlier this year by the European Space Agency's Planck space mission.
(FULL STORY)

Beam Me Up: Bits of Information Teleported Across Computer Chip
[9/14/2013]
Quantum mechanics allows for some very strange things, like the teleportation of information and computers that can break even the toughest codes. Recently, scientists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich made a step toward building a working quantum computer by teleporting bits of information across a computer chip. The results of the study were detailed Aug. 15 in the journal Nature.
(FULL STORY)

Doomsday and disembodied brains? Tiny particle rules universe's fate
[9/14/2013]
The universe may end in another 10 billion years or sooner if the heaviest of all the known elementary particles, the top quark, is even heavier than previously thought, researchers say. If the top quark is not heavier than experiments currently suggest, then an even stranger fate may await the cosmos: disembodied brains and virtually anything else could one day randomly materialize into existence.
(FULL STORY)

The Drake Equation Revisited
[9/4/2013]
Planet hunters keep finding distant worlds that bear a resemblance to Earth. Some of the thousands of exoplanet candidates discovered to date have similar sizes or temperatures. Others possess rocky surfaces and support atmospheres. But no world has yet provided an unambiguous sign of the characteristic that still sets our pale blue dot apart: the presence of life. That may be about to change, says exoplanet expert Sara Seager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Upcoming NASA missions such as the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey (TESS) and the James Webb Space Telescope, both due to launch around 2018, should be able to find and characterize Earth-like planets orbiting small stars.
Spotting signs of life on those planets will be possible because of progress in detecting not only planets, but their atmospheres as well. When a planet passes in front of its host star, atmospheric gases reveal their presence by absorbing some of the starlight. Oxygen, water vapor or other gases that do not belong on dead worlds could very well provide the first evidence of life elsewhere.

In 1961, astronomer Frank Drake developed an equation that summarizes the main factors to contemplate in the question of radio-communicative alien life. These factors include the number of stars in our galaxy that have planets and the length of time advanced alien civilizations would be releasing radio signals into space. Instead of aliens with radio technology, Seager has revised the Drake equation to focus on simply the presence of any alien life.
(FULL STORY)

First Human Mind-Meld Created
[8/28/2013]
Two new researchers have demonstrated the possibility of a human mind-meld, with one man's brain signals directing the other man's hand to move.
(FULL STORY)

Highly sensitive skin-like sensor lights up at touch
[8/22/2013]
A skin-like sensor array that can convert touch directly into light signals has been built from individual-nanowire light-emitting diodes by researchers in the US. The new device appears to be more sensitive to touch than even human skin. It might be ideal in robotics applications, in next-generation touchscreen pads, for improved human-machine interfaces, biological imaging and optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), to name but a few.
(FULL STORY)

NASA's WISE telescope poised for second life as asteroid hunter
[8/22/2013]
A dormant NASA space telescope is to be given a new lease of life - to sniff out near-Earth objects that could be on a collision course with our planet. Agency officials have decided to reactivate WISE, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer that was mothballed in 2011 after spending two years studying the universe.
(FULL STORY)

Cosmic Rays May Reveal Damage to Fukushima's Nuclear Reactors
[8/20/2013]
Radiation is still leaking from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the 2011 tsunami-related meltdown in Japan, making any damage assessment dangerous for both humans and machines. Instead, high-energy particles created by cosmic rays striking the Earth's atmosphere could provide an X-ray-style image of the damage from a much safer distance.
(FULL STORY)

Hunt for Intelligent Aliens Focuses on Faint Laser Flashes
[8/20/2013]
When it comes to detecting laser pulses aliens might shoot at Earth to attract our attention, scientists now find they can detect signals as faint as a single photon of light every few tiny fractions of a second.
(FULL STORY)

Sluggish Surprise Found Deep Inside Earth
[8/15/2013]
The way heat flows near the Earth's core, which is key to understanding the planet's evolution, has now been revealed to move more sluggishly than previously thought, researchers said.
(FULL STORY)

Star Trek Tricorder About to Come True for Medicine
[7/22/2013]
Scanadu CEO Walter DeBrouwer scans SPACE.com's Clara Moskowitz with his company's non-invasive wireless device and tells her whats under the hood ... in more ways than one.
(FULL STORY)


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