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Top News
•  Quantum bits get their first compression
•  Higgs Boson to the World Wide Web: 7 Big Discoveries Made at CERN
•  'Space Bubbles' May Have Doomed Key Afghan War Mission
•  Is Our Universe Really 'Slip Slidin Away'?
•  Quantum Entanglement Creates New State of Matter
•  Photons weave their way through a triple slit
•  Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory
•  Cosmic inflation: BICEP 'underestimated' dust problem
•  Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets
•  Synopsis: More Dark Matter Hints from Cosmic Rays?
•  Surprise! Monster Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy
•  Stalking the Shadow Universe
•  Scattered neutrons could mimic DAMA-LIBRA's 'dark matter' modulation
•  Stalking the Shadow Universe
•  Universe Shouldn't Be Here, According to Higgs Physics
•  Nearby Alien Planet May Be Capable of Supporting Life
•  The First Indirect Detection of Dark Matter
•  Higgs Boson Confirms Reigning Physics Model Yet Again
•  Dark Matter Mystery Deepens
•  Gravitational-wave team admits findings could amount to dust
•  Plasmonic waveguide stops light in its tracks
•  Large Hadron Collider Discovers 'Very Exotic Matter' That Challenges Traditional Physics
•  Physicists link neutron stars to earthbound alloys
•  New material offers angular control over light
•  Lasers to Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox?
•  Big Bang Discovery Opens Doors to the "Multiverse"
•  Big Bang breakthrough announced; gravitational waves detected
•  Paradox Solved? How Information Can Escape from a Black Hole
•  Weird 'Entangled' Light Gives Microscope Sharper Images
•  Population of Known Alien Planets Nearly Doubles as NASA Discovers 715 New Worlds
•  Quantum Dropleton: Weird New Particle Acts Like Liquid
•  Fresh hint of dark matter seen in neutrino search
•  Baby universe rumbled with thunder of Higgs bubbles
•  Dark-Matter Detector to Begin Operations Soon in China
•  Laser Facility Blasts Way to Fusion First
•  No Black Holes Exist, Says Stephen Hawking--At Least Not Like We Think
•  Quasar shines a bright light on cosmic web
•  Deepest galaxy cluster ever pictured by Hubble
•  Scientists can levitate stuff and make it fly around using sound
•  Electron Appears Spherical, Squashing Hopes for New Physics Theories
•  Pulverized Asteroid around Distant Star Was Full of Water
•  Higgs and Englert Are Awarded Nobel Prize in Physics
•  'Higgsogenesis' proposed to explain dark matter
•  A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics
•  Supervolcanoes Rocked Early Mars
•  Hunting quantum gravity in the big bang's echoes
•  Fusion Experiments Inch Closer To Break-Even Goal
•  Curiosity Rover Makes Big Water Discovery in Mars Dirt, a 'Wow Moment'
•  With Earth spinning more slowly, time isn't flying as fast as before
•  Earth Had Oxygen Much Earlier Than Thought
•  Is the universe saddle shaped?
•  Beam Me Up: Bits of Information Teleported Across Computer Chip
•  Doomsday and disembodied brains? Tiny particle rules universe's fate
•  The Drake Equation Revisited
•  First Human Mind-Meld Created
•  Highly sensitive skin-like sensor lights up at touch
•  NASA's WISE telescope poised for second life as asteroid hunter
•  Cosmic Rays May Reveal Damage to Fukushima's Nuclear Reactors
•  Hunt for Intelligent Aliens Focuses on Faint Laser Flashes
•  Sluggish Surprise Found Deep Inside Earth
•  Star Trek Tricorder About to Come True for Medicine
•  Rare Particle Discovery Dims Hopes for Exotic Theories
•  NASA Funds 12 Far-Out Space Tech Ideas
•  Space-Time Loops May Explain Black Holes
•  'Holographic Duality' Hints at Hidden Subatomic World
•  Shields up! Scientists work to produce 'Star Trek' deflector device
•  Fluorescent Polymer Detects Crime Scene Fingerprints
•  Mars Rover Opportunity Hits Driving Milestone on 10th Birthday
•  Nanoparticles Help Scientists Tell Left From Right
•  'Mini-Neptune' Alien Planets in Star Cluster Surprise Scientists
•  From NASA to the Vatican: 10 Amazing Internships
•  Asteroid Miners to Use 3D Printing for Space Telescopes
•  New 'Charmed' Particle Represents Rare State of Matter
•  New Electronics Can Withstand Bodily Fluids
•  Atom Smashers Find Something Not So Charm-ing
•  It's Time to Tackle Interstellar Spaceflight, Experts Say
•  How Ancient Life May Have Come About
•  Top 5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse
•  Baylor Physicists Contribute to Higgs Boson Findings

Quantum bits get their first compression
[9/29/2014]
Without algorithms that compress data to encode information into fewer bits, hard drives would clog up and Internet traffic would slow to a snail's pace. Now, a group of physicists in Canada has shown for the first time that it is possible to compress the kind of data that might be used in the computers of tomorrow — known as quantum bits, or qubits.

Quantum computers promise to perform certain tasks, such as cracking encryption keys or searching databases, exponentially faster than conventional computers can. Such pace is possible in part because while in a classical computer a bit of information can be either a 0 or a 1, a quantum computer can store the information as both values simultaneously, so that qubits can exist in a wide range of 'superpositions' of the two states.
(FULL STORY)

Higgs Boson to the World Wide Web: 7 Big Discoveries Made at CERN
[9/29/2014]
The world's biggest atom smasher, where monumental discoveries such as the detection of the once-elusive Higgs boson particle and the creation of antimatter have occurred, is celebrating its 60th anniversary today (Sept. 29).
Founded in 1954, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, located near Geneva on the French-Swiss border, contains some of the largest and most advanced particle accelerators in the world. In honor of the lab's anniversary, here are a few of the greatest discoveries made at CERN over the past six decades.
(FULL STORY)

'Space Bubbles' May Have Doomed Key Afghan War Mission
[9/27/2014]
Twelve years ago, a U.S. military rescue mission in Afghanistan went horribly wrong. A Chinook helicopter carrying U.S. troops failed to receive a crucial radio message and was shot down over the snow-covered peak of Takur Ghar.
But the radio failure was not caused by malfunctioning equipment. Instead, a giant, 62-mile-long (100 kilometers) "plasma bubble" made up of clouds of electrically charged particles was responsible for the communication blackout, new research suggests.
(FULL STORY)

Is Our Universe Really 'Slip Slidin Away'?
[9/26/2014]
Ok. Some corners of the news media have headlined a comment made by Stephen Hawkings about Hawkings says Higgs Boson could destroy the universe. To their credit, the stories you read are presented tongue-in-cheek with the disclaimer that it is really unlikely that this will happen. But if it does, our familiar universe will simply wink-out and be replaced by another kind of universe based upon different laws. Presumably the transition will be instantaneous and you will not feel a thing.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum Entanglement Creates New State of Matter
[9/22/2014]
Half a million ultracold atoms were linked together in the first-ever “macroscopic spin singlet” state.Physicists have used a quantum connection Albert Einstein called “spooky action at a distance” to link 500,000 atoms together so that their fates were entwined. The atoms were connected via “entanglement,” which means an action performed on one atom will reverberate on any atom entangled with it, even if the particles are far apart. The huge cloud of entangled atoms is the first “macroscopic spin singlet,” a new state of matter that was predicted but never before realized.

Entanglement is a consequence of the strange probabilistic rules of quantum mechanics and seems to permit an eerie instantaneous connection over long distances that defies the laws of our macroscopic world (hence Einstein’s “spooky” remark). A spin singlet is one form of entanglement where multiple particles’ spins—their intrinsic angular momentum—add up to 0, meaning the system has zero total angular momentum.
(FULL STORY)

Photons weave their way through a triple slit
[9/25/2014]
A flaw in how quantum-interference experiments are interpreted has been quantified for the first time by a team of physicists in India. Using the "path integral" formulation of quantum mechanics, the team calculated the interference pattern created when electrons or photons travel through a set of three slits. It found that non-classical paths – in which a particle can weave its way through several slits – must be considered along with the conventional quantum superposition of three direct paths (one through each of the slits). The team says the effect should be measurable in experiments involving microwave photons, and that the work could also provide insights into potential sources of decoherence in some quantum-information systems.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory
[9/12/2014]
Quantum teleportation1 is a cornerstone of quantum information science due to its essential role in important tasks such as the long-distance transmission of quantum information using quantum repeaters2, 3. This requires the efficient distribution of entanglement between remote nodes of a network4. Here, we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the polarization state of a telecom-wavelength photon onto the state of a solid-state quantum memory. Entanglement is established between a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal storing a single photon that is polarization-entangled with a flying telecom-wavelength photon5, 6. The latter is jointly measured with another flying polarization qubit to be teleported, which heralds the teleportation. The fidelity of the qubit retrieved from the memory is shown to be greater than the maximum fidelity achievable without entanglement, even when the combined distances travelled by the two flying qubits is 25â€...km of standard optical fibre. Our results demonstrate the possibility of long-distance quantum networks with solid-state resources.
(FULL STORY)

Cosmic inflation: BICEP 'underestimated' dust problem
[9/22/2014]
One of the biggest scientific claims of the year has received another set-back. In March, the US BICEP team said it had found a pattern on the sky left by the rapid expansion of space just fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The astonishing assertion was countered quickly by others who thought the group may have underestimated the confounding effects of dust in our own galaxy. That explanation has now been boosted by a new analysis from the European Space Agency's (Esa) Planck satellite. In a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server, Planck's researchers find that the part of the sky being observed by the BICEP team contained significantly more dust than it had assumed. This new information does not mean the original claim is now dead. Not immediately, anyway.
(FULL STORY)

Milky Way may bear 100 million life-giving planets
[6/3/2014]
There are some 100 million other places in the Milky Way galaxy that could support complex life, report a group of university astronomers in the journal Challenges. They have developed a new computation method to examine data from planets orbiting other stars in the universe. Their study provides the first quantitative estimate of the number of worlds in our galaxy that could harbor life above the microbial level.
(FULL STORY)

Synopsis: More Dark Matter Hints from Cosmic Rays?
[9/21/2014]
Excitement still surrounds a possible hint of dark matter in an unexpected excess of cosmic-ray antielectrons (positrons) relative to electrons. A new set of data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station confirms the positron excess and provides the most accurate measurement to date of the shape of both the electron and positron spectra. The analysis reveals that the positron flux is significantly different from the electron flux above 30 GeV in energy, which suggests that positrons and electrons have a different origin.

Cosmic rays are predominantly protons and other nuclei, but electrons and positrons make up part of the mix. Standard astrophysical models of interstellar particle collisions predict that, in cosmic rays, the fraction of positrons relative to electrons should decrease with energy. However, recent observations from satellites (e.g., PAMELA and Fermi) and from AMS have shown that the positron fraction actually increases with energy.

The AMS experiment, which has a large permanent magnet that allows particle discrimination, has been collecting data since May 2011. Out of 41 billion detection events, the AMS collaboration has identified 580,000 positrons and 9.2 million electrons (50% more than in their previous data release, see 3 April 2013 Viewpoint). Thanks to the additional data, they were able to extend their measurements of the positron flux up to 500 GeV and, similarly, of the electron flux up to 700 GeV. The high-precision data reveal that both spectra change their slope at around 30 GeV but behave differently towards higher energies: the positron flux drops off much more slowly than the electron flux. One possible explanation for this spectral difference is that the positrons are being created in annihilations of dark matter particles. The authors say data at higher energy will be needed to confirm a dark matter origin.

This research is published in Physical Review Letters.
(FULL STORY)

Surprise! Monster Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy
[9/17/2014]
Astronomers have just discovered the smallest known galaxy that harbors a huge, supermassive black hole at its core. The relatively nearby dwarf galaxy may house a supermassive black hole at its heart equal in mass to about 21 million suns. The discovery suggests that supermassive black holes may be far more common than previously thought.
(FULL STORY)

Stalking the Shadow Universe
[7/16/2014]
For centuries people have found meaning — or thought they did — in what they could see in the sky, the shapes of the constellations echoing old myths, the sudden feathery intrusion of comets, the regular dances of the planets, the chains of galaxies, spanning unfathomable distances of time and space.

Since the 1980s, however, astronomers have been forced to confront the possibility that most of the universe is invisible, and that all the glittering chains of galaxies are no more substantial, no more reliable guides to physical reality, than greasepaint on the face of a clown.

The brute mathematical truth is that atoms, the stuff of stars, you and me, make up only 5 percent of the universe by weight. A quarter of it is made of mysterious particles known as dark matter, and the remaining 70 percent a mysterious form of energy called dark energy. Physicists theorize that dark matter could be exotic particles left over from the Big Bang. They don’t know what it is, but they can deduce that dark matter is there by its gravitational effect on the things they can see. If Newton’s laws of gravity held over cosmic distances, huge amounts of more matter than we can see were needed to provide the gravitational glue to keep clusters of galaxies from flying apart, and to keep the stars swirling around in galaxies at high speed.
(FULL STORY)

Scattered neutrons could mimic DAMA-LIBRA's 'dark matter' modulation
[7/17/2014]
For the last 16 years, researchers at the DAMA/LIBRA experiment in Italy have seen a controversial annual oscillation in the signal from their dark-matter detector. This type of variation would be seen if the Milky Way galaxy was wreathed in a "halo" of dark matter. But apart from the CoGENT dark-matter experiment in the US, no other dark-matter searches have seen a similar effect. Now, a physicist at Durham University in the UK has proposed an alternative source for the modulation in the form of neutrons, which are knocked out of atoms by muons and neutrinos scattering in the rock or shielding material around DAMA/LIBRA.
(FULL STORY)

Stalking the Shadow Universe
[7/16/2014]
For centuries people have found meaning — or thought they did — in what they could see in the sky, the shapes of the constellations echoing old myths, the sudden feathery intrusion of comets, the regular dances of the planets, the chains of galaxies, spanning unfathomable distances of time and space.
Since the 1980s, however, astronomers have been forced to confront the possibility that most of the universe is invisible, and that all the glittering chains of galaxies are no more substantial, no more reliable guides to physical reality, than greasepaint on the face of a clown.
(FULL STORY)

Universe Shouldn't Be Here, According to Higgs Physics
[6/23/2014]
The universe shouldn't exist — at least according to a new theory. Modeling of conditions soon after the Big Bang suggests the universe should have collapsed just microseconds after its explosive birth, the new study suggests.
(FULL STORY)

Nearby Alien Planet May Be Capable of Supporting Life
[6/26/2014]
A newfound alien world might be able to support life — and it's just a stone's throw from Earth in the cosmic scheme of things. An international team of astronomers has discovered an exoplanet in the star Gliese 832's "habitable zone" — the just-right range of distances that could allow liquid water to exist on a world's surface. The planet, known as Gliese 832c, lies just 16 light-years from Earth. (For perspective, the Milky Way galaxy is about 100,000 light-years wide; the closest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light-years away.)
(FULL STORY)

The First Indirect Detection of Dark Matter
[6/17/2014]
Dark matter is one of the universe's most befuddling, and elusive, components. It could make up roughly a quarter of the universe's total mass and energy, yet no one knows for sure because no one has actually seen it. Well, it may be showing itself at last. nasa's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has recorded high-energy gamma-ray light emanating from the center of the Milky Way that fits well with dark matter predictions. “I would consider it currently the most exciting signal that we have,” said physicist Rafael Lang of Purdue University, who was not involved in the study, at the American Physical Society's meeting in April in Savannah, Ga. If the light were truly caused by dark matter, it would be the first indirect detection of the particles that make up this shadowy substance.
(FULL STORY)

Higgs Boson Confirms Reigning Physics Model Yet Again
[6/23/2014]
For a subatomic particle that remained hidden for nearly 50 years, the Higgs boson is turning out to be remarkably well behaved. Yet more evidence from the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, confirms that the Higgs boson particle, thought to explain why other particles have mass, acts just as predicted by the Standard Model, the dominant physics theory that describes the menagerie of subatomic particles that make up the universe.
(FULL STORY)

Dark Matter Mystery Deepens
[6/17/2014]
New results from the particle detector attached outside the International Space Station show something else beside ordinary matter is generating cosmic rays, the lead researcher said Tuesday.
(FULL STORY)

Gravitational-wave team admits findings could amount to dust
[6/20/2014]
Astronomers who announced in March that they had evidence of waves originating from the Big Bang have adopted a more cautious stance as they publish their results in a peer-reviewed journal — just as new independent data cast additional doubt on the original findings. Settlement for UCLA chemist over student death China rover scans deep into the Moon's geological history BICEP2 team concedes problems with gravitational- wave signal
In a paper published on 19 June in Physical Review Letters1, the BICEP2 collaboration, named after the South Pole telescope they used to look at a patch of the microwave sky, acknowledges that the foreground effect of dust in the Milky Way may account for a larger fraction than previously estimated — and possibly all — of what had appeared to be a signal from the dawn of time.
(FULL STORY)

Plasmonic waveguide stops light in its tracks
[4/14/2014]
A simple, solid-state waveguide that can "stop" light has been proposed by physicists in the UK. The researchers say that their device – which has yet to be built in the lab – would be straightforward to create and could be used as an interface between electronic and optical circuits. The waveguide could also lead to the development of new lasers and molecular-imaging systems.
(FULL STORY)

Large Hadron Collider Discovers 'Very Exotic Matter' That Challenges Traditional Physics
[4/14/2014]
Scientists have discovered a new "very exotic" type of matter that challenges the traditional model of particle physics. Using the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) Collaboration at Cern in Geneva, the New York scientists say they have confirmed the discovery of exotic hadrons which cannot be classified using the traditional quark model – a classification scheme for hadrons.
(FULL STORY)

Physicists link neutron stars to earthbound alloys
[3/26/2014]
Neutron stars could share some unlikely similarities with metallic alloys here on Earth. That's the conclusion of two physicists in Scandinavia, who have carried out calculations that reveal that the nuclei and neutrons in the outer crust of these stars play a similar role to the different metals in an alloy. The finding could provide insights into some observable properties of neutron stars, including gamma-ray bursts, rotational glitches and gravitational waves.
(FULL STORY)

New material offers angular control over light
[3/27/2014]
A new material that filters light according to its direction of travel has been developed by physicists in the US and China. Made of alternating layers of two different transparent materials, the structure is just 8 μm thick and offers a new and extremely simple way of controlling the direction in which light propagates. According to its inventors, the material could be used in a range of applications, from photography to solar energy.
(FULL STORY)

Lasers to Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox?
[3/25/2014]
In an effort to help solve the black hole information paradox that has immersed theoretical physics in an ocean of soul searching for the past two years, two researchers have thrown their hats into the ring with a novel solution: Lasers.
(FULL STORY)

Big Bang Discovery Opens Doors to the "Multiverse"
[3/18/2014]
Bored with your old dimensions—up and down, right and left, and back and forth? So tiresome. Take heart, folks. The latest news from Big Bang cosmologists offers us some relief from our humdrum four-dimensional universe. Gravitational waves rippling through the aftermath of the cosmic fireball, physicists suggest, point to us inhabiting a multiverse, a universe filled with many universes.
(FULL STORY)

Big Bang breakthrough announced; gravitational waves detected
[3/18/2014]
There's no way for us to know exactly what happened some 13.8 billion years ago, when our universe burst onto the scene. But scientists announced Monday a breakthrough in understanding how our world as we know it came to be.
If the discovery holds up to scrutiny, it's evidence of how the universe rapidly expanded less than a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang
(FULL STORY)

Paradox Solved? How Information Can Escape from a Black Hole
[3/4/2014]
Every black hole conceals a secret — the quantum remains of the star from which it formed, say a group of scientists, who also predict that these stars can later emerge once the black hole evaporates. The researchers call these objects "Planck stars" and believe that they could solve a very important question in modern physics: the information paradox, or the question of what happens to information contained in matter that falls into a black hole. The idea could also finally reconcile quantum mechanics and Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that describes gravity, thus showing how a theory of quantum gravity might solve longstanding puzzles in the world of physics.
(FULL STORY)

Weird 'Entangled' Light Gives Microscope Sharper Images
[3/3/2014]
The first microscope that uses the eerie trick of quantum entanglement to increase its sensitivity has been developed by Japanese researchers. The new tool relies on a weird principle of quantum mechanics, in which two particles can become entangled so that even when separated by large distances, say light-years, they are intimately connected. Using such entangled photons, or particles of light, the microscope reveals things that are completely transparent, visualizing them in a much better quality than could be done with ordinary light.
(FULL STORY)

Population of Known Alien Planets Nearly Doubles as NASA Discovers 715 New Worlds
[2/26/2014]
NASA's Kepler space telescope has discovered more than 700 new exoplanets, nearly doubling the current number of confirmed alien worlds. The 715 newfound planets, which scientists announced today (Feb. 26), boost the total alien-world tally to between 1,500 and 1,800, depending on which of the five main extrasolar planet discovery catalogs is used. The Kepler mission is responsible for more than half of these finds, hauling in 961 exoplanets to date, with thousands more candidates awaiting confirmation by follow-up investigations.
(FULL STORY)

Quantum Dropleton: Weird New Particle Acts Like Liquid
[2/26/2014]
Physicists can spend years seeking new particles to illuminate aspects of nature's laws, but an international team decided instead to make their own particles. Called a dropleton or quantum droplet, the newly created "particle" is actually a short-lived cluster of electrons and positive charges called "holes." Like other so-called quasiparticles, dropletons act like single particles.
(FULL STORY)

Fresh hint of dark matter seen in neutrino search
[2/25/2014]
Flashes of X-rays from crowded galaxy clusters could be the long-awaited sign that we have found particles of dark matter – the elusive substance thought to make up the bulk of all matter in the universe. If the results stand up, dark matter would consist of ghostly particles called "sterile" neutrinos. These tantalising particles would be the first kind found beyond the standard set known to science.
(FULL STORY)

Baby universe rumbled with thunder of Higgs bubbles
[2/19/2014]
Bubbles popping in the hot particle soup that filled the early universe may have created a rumble like thunder, and it is possible that we can detect the echoes today. Finding them could help solve some mysteries of the Higgs boson and maybe lead to new physics.
(FULL STORY)

Dark-Matter Detector to Begin Operations Soon in China
[2/13/2014]
China is entering the race to detect mysterious dark matter in a big way, with a huge facility in Sichuan province set to begin collecting data in the coming weeks.
The $8 million PandaX (Particle and Astrophysical Xenon) experiment -- which lies 7,874 feet (2,400 meters) underground, inside a mountain made of marble -- will be up and running early this year, IEEE Spectrum reported recently on Discovery News. When it comes online, PandaX will join the world's other subterranean dark-matter experiments, such as the XENON project in Italy and the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) effort in South Dakota.
(FULL STORY)

Laser Facility Blasts Way to Fusion First
[2/12/2014]
Energy researchers report a tenfold increase in power from laser fusion experiments in a study released Wednesday, a step closer to someday bottling the power of the sun. The report from the U.S. Department of Energy's $3.5 billion National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore (California) National Laboratory comes after a decade of disappointments. (See: "Fusion Energy Quest Faces Boundaries of Budget, Science.") The report offers encouragement to long-frustrated efforts to harness fusion, which provides the punch in hydrogen bombs, as a plentiful source of pollution-free nuclear energy.
(FULL STORY)

No Black Holes Exist, Says Stephen Hawking--At Least Not Like We Think
[1/28/2014]
Black holes do not exist--at least, not as we know them, says renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, potentially provoking a rethink of one of space's most mysterious objects.

A new study from Hawking also says that black holes may not possess "firewalls," destructive belts of radiation that some researchers have proposed would incinerate anything that passes through them but others scientists deem an impossibility.
(FULL STORY)

Quasar shines a bright light on cosmic web
[1/23/2014]
The first view of part of a filament of the "cosmic web" might have been glimpsed by astronomers, thanks to a quasar acting like a torch to illuminate the gas. The observations, made by an international team of researchers, could be the first evidence of the long-predicted large-scale structure of matter in our universe - a network of filaments thought to connect all matter, including galaxies and gas clouds.
(FULL STORY)

Deepest galaxy cluster ever pictured by Hubble
[1/8/2014]
The "deepest ever" image of a group of galaxies - "Pandora's Cluster" - has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.
(FULL STORY)

Scientists can levitate stuff and make it fly around using sound
[1/14/2014]
Japanese scientists have made hundreds of tiny plastic balls float around like miniature spaceships.
(FULL STORY)

Electron Appears Spherical, Squashing Hopes for New Physics Theories
[11/11/2013]
Scientists are unanimous that their current theory of physics is incomplete. Yet every effort to expose a deeper theory has so far disappointed. Now the most sensitive test yet of the shape of an electron--a property that could expose underlying "new physics"--has failed to find hints of anything novel. The finding rules out a number of favored ideas for extending physics, including some versions of a popular idea called supersymmetry.
(FULL STORY)

Pulverized Asteroid around Distant Star Was Full of Water
[10/10/2013]

(FULL STORY)

Higgs and Englert Are Awarded Nobel Prize in Physics
[10/8/2013]
Two theoretical physicists who suggested that an invisible ocean of energy suffusing space is responsible for the mass and diversity of the particles in the universe won the Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday morning. They are Peter Higgs, 84, of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, and François Englert, 80, of the University Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium.
(FULL STORY)

'Higgsogenesis' proposed to explain dark matter
[10/4/2013]
A key riddle in cosmology may be answered by the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson -- now a leading contender for the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on 8 October. Two physicists suggest that the Higgs had a key role in the early Universe, producing the observed difference between the number of matter and antimatter particles and determining the density of the mysterious dark matter that makes up five-sixths of the matter in the Universe.
(FULL STORY)

A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics
[9/17/2013]
Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.
(FULL STORY)

Supervolcanoes Rocked Early Mars
[10/2/2013]
The planets of the inner solar system--Earth, Mars, Venus, and Mercury--started their lives as boiling-hot balls of rock, which cooled to feature thin crusts battered by asteroid and comet impacts. On Mars, that early crust was perhaps also punctured by supersize volcanoes with calderas more than 30 miles (50 kilometers) wide, a newly identified kind of volcanism on the red planet.
(FULL STORY)

Hunting quantum gravity in the big bang's echoes
[9/30/2013]
Uniting gravity with its quantum nemesis might take a detector the size of the universe. So say two physicists who think they have found a way to resolve one of the biggest conflicts in modern physics using high-resolution maps of the infant cosmos.
(FULL STORY)

Fusion Experiments Inch Closer To Break-Even Goal
[9/30/2013]
Fusion energy has proven an elusive goal -- a running joke is that humanity is 20 years away from a practical power plant, and has been for 60 years.That could be changing, said John Edwards, associate director for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density science of the National Ignition Facility. In a recent piece published in the journal Physics of Plasmas, Edwards said NIF scientists are getting closer to reactions that produce more energy than they need to get going, and added that the obstacles to realizing nuclear fusion involve engineering problems rather than basic physics.
(FULL STORY)

Curiosity Rover Makes Big Water Discovery in Mars Dirt, a 'Wow Moment'
[9/26/2013]
Future Mars explorers may be able to get all the water they need out of the red dirt beneath their boots, a new study suggests.
(FULL STORY)

With Earth spinning more slowly, time isn't flying as fast as before
[9/25/2013]
Don't forget to set your clocks ahead two thousandths of a second before you go to sleep tonight. Same thing goes for bedtime tomorrow. And every day after that, because that is how much slower the Earth turns on its axis each day now than it did a century ago.
(FULL STORY)

Earth Had Oxygen Much Earlier Than Thought
[9/25/2013]
Oxygen may have filled Earth's atmosphere hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought, suggesting that sunlight-dependent life akin to modern plants evolved very early in Earth's history, a new study finds.
(FULL STORY)

Is the universe saddle shaped?
[9/19/2013]
The geometry of the universe is "open" or negatively curved like a saddle, according to a new model proposed by researchers in Europe who have studied anomalies in the cosmic microwave background radiation. The anomalies were first detected by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in 2004 and were confirmed earlier this year by the European Space Agency's Planck space mission.
(FULL STORY)

Beam Me Up: Bits of Information Teleported Across Computer Chip
[9/14/2013]
Quantum mechanics allows for some very strange things, like the teleportation of information and computers that can break even the toughest codes. Recently, scientists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich made a step toward building a working quantum computer by teleporting bits of information across a computer chip. The results of the study were detailed Aug. 15 in the journal Nature.
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Doomsday and disembodied brains? Tiny particle rules universe's fate
[9/14/2013]
The universe may end in another 10 billion years or sooner if the heaviest of all the known elementary particles, the top quark, is even heavier than previously thought, researchers say. If the top quark is not heavier than experiments currently suggest, then an even stranger fate may await the cosmos: disembodied brains and virtually anything else could one day randomly materialize into existence.
(FULL STORY)

The Drake Equation Revisited
[9/4/2013]
Planet hunters keep finding distant worlds that bear a resemblance to Earth. Some of the thousands of exoplanet candidates discovered to date have similar sizes or temperatures. Others possess rocky surfaces and support atmospheres. But no world has yet provided an unambiguous sign of the characteristic that still sets our pale blue dot apart: the presence of life. That may be about to change, says exoplanet expert Sara Seager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Upcoming NASA missions such as the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey (TESS) and the James Webb Space Telescope, both due to launch around 2018, should be able to find and characterize Earth-like planets orbiting small stars.
Spotting signs of life on those planets will be possible because of progress in detecting not only planets, but their atmospheres as well. When a planet passes in front of its host star, atmospheric gases reveal their presence by absorbing some of the starlight. Oxygen, water vapor or other gases that do not belong on dead worlds could very well provide the first evidence of life elsewhere.

In 1961, astronomer Frank Drake developed an equation that summarizes the main factors to contemplate in the question of radio-communicative alien life. These factors include the number of stars in our galaxy that have planets and the length of time advanced alien civilizations would be releasing radio signals into space. Instead of aliens with radio technology, Seager has revised the Drake equation to focus on simply the presence of any alien life.
(FULL STORY)

First Human Mind-Meld Created
[8/28/2013]
Two new researchers have demonstrated the possibility of a human mind-meld, with one man's brain signals directing the other man's hand to move.
(FULL STORY)

Highly sensitive skin-like sensor lights up at touch
[8/22/2013]
A skin-like sensor array that can convert touch directly into light signals has been built from individual-nanowire light-emitting diodes by researchers in the US. The new device appears to be more sensitive to touch than even human skin. It might be ideal in robotics applications, in next-generation touchscreen pads, for improved human-machine interfaces, biological imaging and optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), to name but a few.
(FULL STORY)

NASA's WISE telescope poised for second life as asteroid hunter
[8/22/2013]
A dormant NASA space telescope is to be given a new lease of life - to sniff out near-Earth objects that could be on a collision course with our planet. Agency officials have decided to reactivate WISE, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer that was mothballed in 2011 after spending two years studying the universe.
(FULL STORY)

Cosmic Rays May Reveal Damage to Fukushima's Nuclear Reactors
[8/20/2013]
Radiation is still leaking from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the 2011 tsunami-related meltdown in Japan, making any damage assessment dangerous for both humans and machines. Instead, high-energy particles created by cosmic rays striking the Earth's atmosphere could provide an X-ray-style image of the damage from a much safer distance.
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Hunt for Intelligent Aliens Focuses on Faint Laser Flashes
[8/20/2013]
When it comes to detecting laser pulses aliens might shoot at Earth to attract our attention, scientists now find they can detect signals as faint as a single photon of light every few tiny fractions of a second.
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Sluggish Surprise Found Deep Inside Earth
[8/15/2013]
The way heat flows near the Earth's core, which is key to understanding the planet's evolution, has now been revealed to move more sluggishly than previously thought, researchers said.
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Star Trek Tricorder About to Come True for Medicine
[7/22/2013]
Scanadu CEO Walter DeBrouwer scans SPACE.com's Clara Moskowitz with his company's non-invasive wireless device and tells her whats under the hood ... in more ways than one.
(FULL STORY)

Rare Particle Discovery Dims Hopes for Exotic Theories
[7/19/2013]
Physicists have measured an extremely rare particle decay inside the world's largest atom smasher -- a discovery that bolsters the leading model of particle physics and leaves little room for undiscovered particles beyond this theory.
(FULL STORY)

NASA Funds 12 Far-Out Space Tech Ideas
[7/19/2013]
NASA has granted funding to a dozen imaginative tech concepts, in the hopes that one or more of them will lead to big breakthroughs in space science and exploration.

The 12 ideas, which were selected under Phase 1 of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program, are ambitious and varied. One aims to build biomaterials such as human tissue with a 3D printer, for example, while another proposes to induce deep-sleep torpor states in astronauts making the long journey
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Space-Time Loops May Explain Black Holes
[7/10/2013]
Physics cannot describe what happens inside a black hole. There, current theories break down, and general relativity collides with quantum mechanics, creating what's called a singularity, or a point at which the equations spit out infinities. But some advanced physics theories are trying to bridge the gap between general relativity and quantum mechanics, to understand what's truly going on inside the densest objects in the universe. Recently, scientists applied a theory called loop quantum gravity to the case of black holes, and found that inside these objects, space and time may be extremely curved, but that gravity there is not infinite, as general relativity predicts.
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'Holographic Duality' Hints at Hidden Subatomic World
[7/8/2013]
Increasingly over the past decade, studying the black hole equivalents of strongly correlated forms of matter has yielded groundbreaking results, such as a new equation for the viscosity of strongly interacting fluids and a better grasp of interactions between quarks and gluons, which are particles found in the nuclei of atoms. Now Gary Horowitz, a physics professor at UC-Santa Barbara, and Jorge Santos, a post-doctoral researcher in Horowitz's group, have modeled strange materials called cuprates as peculiarly shaped black holes in higher dimensions.
(FULL STORY)

Shields up! Scientists work to produce 'Star Trek' deflector device
[7/2/2013]
Scientists at the UK's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are working on a radiation shield for astronauts
A model has been tested inside a fusion reactor which produces a plasma like that of the solar wind
(FULL STORY)

Fluorescent Polymer Detects Crime Scene Fingerprints
[7/3/2013]
The latest in high-tech crime-scene investigation is a "fluorescent tag" that can help identify fingerprints on bullets, knives and other metal surfaces by creating images that are accurate to the nanoscale.
(FULL STORY)

Mars Rover Opportunity Hits Driving Milestone on 10th Birthday
[7/5/2013]
On the 10th anniversary of its launch, NASA's Opportunity rover on Mars is also celebrating reaching the halfway point in its drive from one crater-rim segment to another.
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Nanoparticles Help Scientists Tell Left From Right
[6/28/2013]
A new method that amplifies the difference between right-handed and left-handed molecules could lead to the development of new nanomaterials, optical sensors and pharmaceutical drugs.
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'Mini-Neptune' Alien Planets in Star Cluster Surprise Scientists
[6/26/2013]
Astronomers using the planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft have found two planets circling different stars in the violent environment of an ancient open star cluster called NGC 6811 located about 3,300 light-years from Earth. Until now, four of the more than 850 planets known outside the solar system were spotted in clusters.
(FULL STORY)

From NASA to the Vatican: 10 Amazing Internships
[6/27/2013]
You could be gaining professional experience â�" and potentially having the time of your life â�" with the right summer internship.
(FULL STORY)

Asteroid Miners to Use 3D Printing for Space Telescopes
[6/28/2013]
3D printing could help the asteroid-mining industry get off the ground.
(FULL STORY)

New 'Charmed' Particle Represents Rare State of Matter
[6/21/2013]
The Beijing Spectrometer Experiment (BESIII) found evidence of a new particle that may contain four quarks. The same particle was independently found at the Belle experiment in Japan, with both projects publishing their results June 17, 2013.
(FULL STORY)

New Electronics Can Withstand Bodily Fluids
[6/21/2013]
Electronicsand bodily fluids don't mix well. But new technology enables electronic devices to function in direct contact with tissues inside the body. The technology could allow scientists to make sensors that detect the early stages of organ transplant rejection, or create artificial nerves, researchers say.
(FULL STORY)

Atom Smashers Find Something Not So Charm-ing
[6/20/2013]
At a news conference Sunday (April 14) at the American Physical Society meeting in Denver, three panelists offered their takes on the quest for new particle species, including a structure never seen before, and for confirmation that a model called supersymmetry might be true.
(FULL STORY)

It's Time to Tackle Interstellar Spaceflight, Experts Say
[6/5/2013]
If humanity is serious about traveling to other star star systems in the foreseeable future, it needs to get the ball rolling now, say experts who have organized the upcoming conference "Starship Congress" on the subject.
(FULL STORY)

How Ancient Life May Have Come About
[3/29/2013]
A family tree unites a diverse group of individuals that all carry genetic vestiges from a single common ancestor at the base of the tree. But this organizational structure falls apart if genetic information is a communal resource as opposed to a family possession.
Some evidence suggests that early evolution may have been based on a collective sharing of genes. A group of researchers are now searching for clear genetic vestiges from this communal ancestry.
(FULL STORY)

Top 5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse
[12/7/2012]
The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a "multiverse." Though the concept may stretch credulity, there's good physics behind it. And there's not just one way to get to a multiverse -- numerous physics theories independently point to such a conclusion. In fact, some experts think the existence of hidden universes is more likely than not.
Here are the five most plausible scientific theories suggesting we live in a multiverse.
(FULL STORY)

Baylor Physicists Contribute to Higgs Boson Findings
[7/4/2012]
WACO, Texas (July 4, 2012) - Baylor University postdoctoral research associate Azeddine Kasmi, Ph.D., will present the latest results on the search for the Higgs boson from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment at the International Conference on High Energy Physics currently underway in Melbourne, Australia.
(FULL STORY)


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