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•  Surprise! Monster Black Hole Found in Dwarf Galaxy

Baylor & CMS Collaboration

Sept. 17, 2010

The CMS collaboration welcomed Baylor University, the oldest continually operating university in the lone star state, into its ranks at last month's collaboration board meeting at CERN. Founded in 1845, the central-Texas university has been a member of the CDF experiment at Fermilab since 2005 and members of its physics department feel honored to add another Energy Frontier experiment to their roster. "CMS was a natural choice for our group," said Kenichi Hatakeyama, a physicist at Baylor University. Even though Baylor University just became an official member of the collaboration, Hatakeyama had already been involved in CMS as a research associate at Rockefeller University in New York. When he joined Baylor University last summer, the department expressed interest in expanding their collider physics program. They made it Hatakeyama's personal mission to join CMS, while continuing his work at Baylor. "This is very important to us because it is going to be a long-term research project," said Jay Dittmann, a physicist at Baylor who presented the proposal with Hatakeyama to CMS. "Joining the CMS collaboration at CERN is the future of our high-energy physics research program here at Baylor."In addition to Dittmann and Hatakeyama, the Baylor group has two postdocs and expects to gain some graduate students soon. They plan to focus on the hadron calorimeter with an emphasis on data validation and calibration. They are also making contributions to the JetMET physics object group, especially in Data Quality Monitoring. "We wanted to start by contributing to the fundamental foundation of the experiment,"Hatakeyama said. The U.S. CMS collaboration now has a total of 49-member institutions."I would like to congratulate Baylor University on joining CMS," said Nick Hadley,the U.S. CMS Collaboration Board chair. "They are already making significant contributions, and I am glad that they have joined us in this crucial and exciting time."

(Editor's Note: The following article by Elizabeth Clements is reprinted from the June 25, 2010 Issue of FermiLab Today.)