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Top News
•  They're Out There! Most People Believe in E.T.
•  Salty Water Flows on Mars Today, Boosting Odds for Life
•  Democracy suffers a blow—in particle physics
•  Evidence suggests subatomic particles could defy the standard model
•  Extreme Conditions Create 'Perfect,' but Fleeting, Matter
•  Quantum weirdness proved real in first loophole-free experiment
•  Astronomers discover the biggest thing in the Universe
•  Possible new particle hints that universe may not be left-handed
•  Stephen Hawking says he has a way to escape from a black hole
•  In Memoriam: Jacob Bekenstein (1947–2015) and Black Hole Entropy
•  Wormhole Created in Lab Makes Invisible Magnetic Field
•  Experiment attempts to snare a dark energy 'chameleon'
•  Antarctica Scientists Confirm Existence of Cosmic Neutrinos
•  Mystery Deepens: Matter and Antimatter Are Mirror Images
•  Are Aliens Trying To Contact Us? Mathematical Radio Waves From Deep Space Baffle Scientitsts.
•  Earth-Like Alien World Could Have Vast Oceans
•  Super Strong Magnetic Fields Could Be the Key to Our Nuclear Fusion Future
•  New study predicts the slow, inevitable death of the universe
•  NASA estimates 1 billion ‘Earths’ in our galaxy alone
•  Ancient Galaxy Is Most Distant Ever Found
•  LHC Keeps Bruising 'Difficult to Kill' Supersymmetry
•  Dark Pion Particles May Explain Universe's Invisible Matter
•  Is the universe ringing like a crystal glass?
•  NASA Finds Closest Earth Twin Yet in Haul of 500 Alien Planets
•  Physicists Observe Weyl Points for the First Time
•  A Dark Matter bridge in our cosmic neighborhood
•  Neutrons find 'missing' magnetism of plutonium
•  Superconductor could be realized in a broken Lorenz invariant theory
•  Rare system of five stars discovered
•  Dark matter map begins to reveal the universe's early history
•  Astronomers Discover Hundreds of Weird Galaxies Filled With Dark Matter
•  NASA Telescopes Set Limits on Space-time Quantum "Foam"
•  Forget Space-Time: Information May Create the Cosmos
•  Left-handed cosmic magnetic field could explain missing antimatter
•  Electron pairing without superconductivity seen at long last
•  Atomic gas puts the brakes on light in optical fibres
•  Black Holes Might Make Dark Matter Shine
•  Ancient star raises prospects of intelligent life
•  Evidence Found in Asteroid Debris For How Water Reached Earth
•  A Hot Start to the Origin of Life?
•  This Galaxy Far, Far Away Is the Farthest One Yet Found
•  Physicists detect radio waves from a single electron
•  A Cold Cosmic Mystery Solved
•  Biggest void in space is 1 billion light years across
•  This Molecule Could've Created the Backbone of DNA and Helped to Kick-Start Life
•  First Signs of Self-interacting Dark Matter?
•  Dark matter map unveils first results
•  Accelerating Universe? Not So Fast
•  Complex Organic Molecules Discovered in Infant Star System
•  Black holes don’t erase information, scientists say
•  Two Earth-sized exoplanets may exist in closest star system, Hubble observations reveal
•  New Research Suggests Solar System May Have Once Harbored Super-Earths
•  Dark matter 'ghosts' through galactic smash-ups
•  Astronomers Discover Dwarf Galaxies Orbiting the Milky Way
•  Terraforming Mars by Polluting its Atmosphere
•  Fresh hint of dark matter seen in neutrino search
•  Gamma Rays May Be Clue on Dark Matter
•  Nasa finds evidence of a vast ancient ocean on Mars
•  'Life Not As We Know It': New Research Shows How Exotic Biology May Be Possible on Titan
•  Why isn’t the universe as bright as it should be?
•  Here’s The First-Ever Photo of Light Behaving as Both a Wave and a Particle
•  Scientists discover black hole so big it contradicts growth theory
•  The Hills Have Ice... on Mars, That Is
•  Did dark matter kill the dinosaurs?
•  Dark Matter Influences Supermassive Black Hole Growth
•  'Golden stars' pulsate in a strange, non-chaotic way
•  Slimy Microbes May Have Carpeted Earth 3.2 Billion Years Ago
•  'Shadow biosphere' might be hiding strange life right under our noses
•  Cosmic "Reionization" Is More Recent than Predicted
•  Evidence for the Presence of Dark Matter in the Innermost Part of the Milky Way
•  Dark matter found in Milky Way’s core
•  Planck: Gravitational Waves Remain Elusive
•  Ancient miniature solar system hints at existence of alien life
•  Cosmic 'Nuclear Pasta' May Be Stranger Than Originally Thought
•  How the Earth got its nitrogen
•  Three nearly Earth-size planets found orbiting nearby star
•  How 'Quantum Dots' Could Probe Mysteries of Entanglement
•  Space chemistry could be cooking up icy building blocks of life, study says
•  Using a Vanishing Neutron Star to Measure Space-time Warp
•  Did Gravity Save the Universe from 'God Particle' Higgs Boson?
•  8 Newfound Alien Worlds Could Potentially Support Life
•  Planet hunters plot course for habitable worlds
•  The Stellar Origins of Your Toothpaste
•  The world of physics in 2015
•  NASA Rover Finds Mysterious Methane Emissions on Mars
•  Researchers use real data rather than theory to measure the cosmos
•  Superconductivity record breaks under pressure
•  New Dark Matter Detector Will Be 100 Times More Sensitive to Dark Matter
•  Researchers report possible dark matter signal
•  Quantum Teleportation Reaches Farthest Distance Yet
•  Mars Rover Finds Stronger Potential for Life
•  Quantum computer quest
•  See it, touch it, feel it: Team develops invisible 3-D haptic shape
•  European probe shoots down dark-matter claims
•  Gravity may have saved the universe after the Big Bang
•  How to estimate the magnetic field of an exoplanet
•  Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics
•  GPS satellites might be able to detect elusive dark matter

Careers in Physics

March 4, 2010

College students change their major an average of three times in the four years in school, according to Deciding what career to do for the rest of your life that will support your eating-out habits and your obsession with ordering things off Amazon is enough to make you start hyperventilating.

Advisors are beginning to see a trend in the number of jobs that are open to particular majors. More people are beginning to change career paths numerous times in their lifetime. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has found a jump in the number of jobs the average person will hold in a lifetime.

The question is no longer, "What can I do with my major," but "What can't I do?"

Many Paths for Physicists

Physics majors have long been viewed as one-option-career-path physicists. However, that is no longer the case. A degree in physics covers a wide array of job offers, from specialized engineering to optometry. According to the bureau of labor statistics, physicists hold about 17,100 jobs in the US.

Because physics is the study of learning how things work, students in this field develop step-by-step problem solving abilities using skills in math, observation and communication. Physic majors develop a critical way of thinking that contributes to a variety of professions.

The job outlook for physicists is experiencing faster-than-average job growth. No longer are students waiting for professors or established physicists to retire so they may be able to take their place. Similarly, opportunities in the industry are just as numerous as those in universities and university research.

"It is time for the academic physics community to redefine what a physicist is and to embrace industrial physicists (bachelors, masters, and PhD's) as their colleagues. It is also time for the industry to take the mask off these hidden physicists and identify them by their proper title. The physics profession and industry would be well served if both these things happened," says Dr. Jay Dittman, associate professor of Physics.

Physics in Business, Medicine and Science

A Bachelor of Science in physics provides a solid base for students hoping to earn an advanced degree in areas beyond science or medicine, such as business, law or accounting.

Business is a good path for physics major because of the rigorous math courses students have undertaken. They would become an asset as economists by developing models, predictions and research regarding future economic conditions. Many physicists that go into business find themselves becoming executives or owners of companies.

Physicists develop a way of thinking that various fields need in order to create technological advances or to conduct research.

In a world where ipads and touch screen machines are becoming common fixtures in our lives, there is a need for people in the legal profession that are able to not only create patents and contracts, but who can also understand the scientific complexities behind such contracts.

If a physic major decides to go into the medical field there are other job possibilities besides becoming a doctor. Hospitals or manufacturers of diagnostic tools look for employees that can create machines that are in need in the health care system, such as MRIs or CAT scans.

Technology plays an important role for physicists for research and product development. Companies look for people that are able to test new devices involving superconductivity, optics, or lasers. Those areas are familiar territory for physics majors.

Much More Than a Major

Overall, the outlook for physics majors is bright. A variety of career opportunities offer a good match between a student's interest in physics and a job in any number of industries. Rapid advances in technology and the many applications of physics open up options for students that may not have previously existed.