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Top News
•  Small entropy changes allow quantum measurements to be nearly reversed
•  Did the Mysterious 'Planet Nine' Tilt the Solar System?
•  Cosmological mystery solved by largest ever map of voids and superclusters
•  The Universe Has 10 Times More Galaxies Than Scientists Thought
•  Correlation between galaxy rotation and visible matter puzzles astronomers
•  The Spooky Secret Behind Artificial Intelligence's Incredible Power
•  Science of Disbelief: When Did Climate Change Become All About Politics?
•  Eyeballing Proxima b: Probably Not a Second Earth
•  Does the Drake Equation Confirm There Is Intelligent Alien Life in the Galaxy?
•  Scientists build world's smallest transistor
•  'Alien Megastructure' Star Keeps Getting Stranger
•  What's Out There? 'Star Men' Doc Tackles Life Questions Through Science
•  Evidence for new form of matter-antimatter asymmetry observed
•  Giant hidden Jupiters may explain lonely planet systems
•  Rarest nucleus reluctant to decay
•  Weird Science: 3 Win Nobel for Unusual States of Matter
•  Methane didn’t warm ancient Earth, new simulations suggest
•  New 'Artificial Synapses' Pave Way for Brain-Like Computers
•  Stephen Hawking Is Still Afraid of Aliens
•  The Ig Nobel Prize Winners of 2016
•  Teleported Laser Pulses? Quantum Teleportation Approaches Sci-Fi Level
•  China Claims It Developed "Quantum" Radar To See Stealth Planes
•  Earth Wobbles May Have Driven Ancient Humans Out of Africa
•  Alien Planet Has 2 Suns Instead of 1, Hubble Telescope Reveals
•  Glider Will Attempt Record-Breaking Flight to Edge of Space
•  Entangled Particles Reveal Even Spookier Action Than Thought
•  Dark Matter Just Got Murkier
•  New 'Gel' May Be Step Toward Clothing That Computes
•  3.7-Billion-Year-Old Rock May Hold Earth's Oldest Fossils
•  Planck: First Stars Formed Later Than We Thought
•  Galaxy Cluster 11.1 Billion Light-Years from Earth Is Most Distant Ever Seen
•  What Earth's Oldest Fossils Mean for Finding Life on Mars
•  Earth Just Narrowly Missed Getting Hit by an Asteroid
•  Astrobiology Primer v2.0 Released
•  A new class of galaxy has been discovered, one made almost entirely of dark matter
•  How We Could Visit the Possibly Earth-Like Planet Proxima b
•  'Virtual' Particles Are Just 'Wiggles' in the Electromagnetic Field
•  Are tiny BLACK HOLES hitting Earth once every 1,000 years? Experts claim primordial phenomenon could explain dark matter
•  ‘Largest structure in the universe’ undermines fundamental cosmic principles
•  "Kitchen Smoke" in nebula offer clues to the building blocks of life
•  Brian Krill: Evolution of the 21st-Century Scientist
•  Simulated black hole experiment backs Hawking prediction
•  Deuteron joins proton as smaller than expected
•  Scientists Identify 20 Alien Worlds Most Likely to Be Like Earth
•  ‘Alien Megastructure’ Star Mystery Deepens After Fresh Kepler Data Confirms Erratic Dimming
•  Scientists develop new form of light
•  New particle hopes fade as LHC data 'bump' disappears
•  Moon Express cleared for lunar landing
•  First Reprogrammable Quantum Computer Created
•  Tiny 'Atomic Memory' Device Could Store All Books Ever Written
•  Error fix for long-lived qubits brings quantum computers nearer
•  2 Newfound Alien Planets May Be Capable of Supporting Life
•  Scientists create vast 3-D map of universe, validate Einstein's theories
•  New Science Experiment Will Tell Us If The Universe Is a Hologram
•  Three's Company: Newly Discovered Planet Orbits a Trio of Stars
•  A Fifth Force: Fact or Fiction?
•  Neutrinos hint at why antimatter didn’t blow up the universe
•  Relativistic codes reveal a clumpy universe
•  Quantum computer makes first high-energy physics simulation
•  E.T. Phones Earth? 1,500 Years Until Contact, Experts Estimate
•  We could be on the brink of a shockingly big discovery in physics
•  Scientists have detected gravitational waves for the second time
•  No Escape From Black Holes? Stephen Hawking Points to a Possible Exit
•  Surprise! The Universe Is Expanding Faster Than Scientists Thought
•  Building Blocks of Life Found in Comet's Atmosphere
•  Quantum cats here and there
•  Planet 1,200 Light-years Away Is A Good Prospect For Habitability
•  Has a Hungarian Physics Lab Found a Fifth Force of Nature?
•  Silicon quantum computers take shape in Australia
•  New Support for Alternative Quantum View
•  Dark matter does not include certain axion-like particles
•  Scientists discover new form of light
•  How light is detected affects the atom that emits it
•  AI learns and recreates Nobel-winning physics experiment
•  Scientists Talk Privately About Creating a Synthetic Human Genome
•  Boiling Water May Be Cause of Martian Streaks
•  Three Newly Discovered Planets Are the Best Bets for Life Outside the Solar System
•  The real reasons nothing can go faster than the speed of light
•  Physicists Abuzz About Possible New Particle as CERN Revs Up
•  Are we the only intelligent life in cosmos? Probably not, say astronomers
•  Could 'black hole' in a lab finally help Stephen Hawking win a Nobel Prize?
•  Gravitational lens reveals hiding dwarf dark galaxy
•  Leonardo Da Vinci's Living Relatives Found
•  Stephen Hawking: We Probably Won't Find Aliens Anytime Soon
•  Measurement of Universe's expansion rate creates cosmological puzzle
•  Stephen Hawking Helps Launch Project 'Starshot' for Interstellar Space Exploration
•  'Bizarre' Group of Distant Black Holes are Mysteriously Aligned
•  Isaac Newton: handwritten recipe reveals fascination with alchemy
•  If there is a planet beyond Neptune, what is it like?
•  The "R" in RNA can easily be made in space, and that has implications for life beyond Earth
•  Surprise! Gigantic Black Hole Found in Cosmic Backwater
•  New Bizarre State of Matter Seems to Split Fundamental Particles
•  Is Mysterious 'Planet Nine' Tugging on NASA Saturn Probe?
•  Researchers made the smallest diode using a DNA molecule
•  Astronomers Discover Colossal 'Super Spiral' Galaxies
•  How a distant planet could have killed the dinosaurs
•  Search for alien signals expands to 20,000 star systems
•  Video: ESA Euronews - Is there life on the Red Planet?
•  New Tetraquark Particle Sparks Doubts
•  7 Theories on the Origin of Life

Careers in Physics

March 4, 2010

College students change their major an average of three times in the four years in school, according to Deciding what career to do for the rest of your life that will support your eating-out habits and your obsession with ordering things off Amazon is enough to make you start hyperventilating.

Advisors are beginning to see a trend in the number of jobs that are open to particular majors. More people are beginning to change career paths numerous times in their lifetime. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has found a jump in the number of jobs the average person will hold in a lifetime.

The question is no longer, "What can I do with my major," but "What can't I do?"

Many Paths for Physicists

Physics majors have long been viewed as one-option-career-path physicists. However, that is no longer the case. A degree in physics covers a wide array of job offers, from specialized engineering to optometry. According to the bureau of labor statistics, physicists hold about 17,100 jobs in the US.

Because physics is the study of learning how things work, students in this field develop step-by-step problem solving abilities using skills in math, observation and communication. Physic majors develop a critical way of thinking that contributes to a variety of professions.

The job outlook for physicists is experiencing faster-than-average job growth. No longer are students waiting for professors or established physicists to retire so they may be able to take their place. Similarly, opportunities in the industry are just as numerous as those in universities and university research.

"It is time for the academic physics community to redefine what a physicist is and to embrace industrial physicists (bachelors, masters, and PhD's) as their colleagues. It is also time for the industry to take the mask off these hidden physicists and identify them by their proper title. The physics profession and industry would be well served if both these things happened," says Dr. Jay Dittman, associate professor of Physics.

Physics in Business, Medicine and Science

A Bachelor of Science in physics provides a solid base for students hoping to earn an advanced degree in areas beyond science or medicine, such as business, law or accounting.

Business is a good path for physics major because of the rigorous math courses students have undertaken. They would become an asset as economists by developing models, predictions and research regarding future economic conditions. Many physicists that go into business find themselves becoming executives or owners of companies.

Physicists develop a way of thinking that various fields need in order to create technological advances or to conduct research.

In a world where ipads and touch screen machines are becoming common fixtures in our lives, there is a need for people in the legal profession that are able to not only create patents and contracts, but who can also understand the scientific complexities behind such contracts.

If a physic major decides to go into the medical field there are other job possibilities besides becoming a doctor. Hospitals or manufacturers of diagnostic tools look for employees that can create machines that are in need in the health care system, such as MRIs or CAT scans.

Technology plays an important role for physicists for research and product development. Companies look for people that are able to test new devices involving superconductivity, optics, or lasers. Those areas are familiar territory for physics majors.

Much More Than a Major

Overall, the outlook for physics majors is bright. A variety of career opportunities offer a good match between a student's interest in physics and a job in any number of industries. Rapid advances in technology and the many applications of physics open up options for students that may not have previously existed.